Global Studies (GLBL)

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Courses

GLBL 2202 The World Today:Introduction to Global Issues: 3 semester hours.

This course takes a thematic approach to highlight major Global issues including health, politics, sports, terrorism, women's empowerment, human rights, science, technology, poverty, etc., and how various regions of the world have responded to the stress and storm that often characterize these life challenges with particular focus on the past two decades. Students will critically analyze how cultural, social, economic, and/or environmental exchanges between people from different regions interact in our globalized world today. Satisfies Objective 9 of the General Education Requirements. F, S, Su

GLBL 2203 International Organizations Today: Conflicts and Cooperation: 3 semester hours.

This course examines the role of international organizations in resolving conflicts and promoting cooperation among countries. Students will take a behind the scene look at international organizations such as the United Nations, NATO, World Bank, WTO, OPEC, etc. We will explore their impacts on peace, human rights, trade, and development via current events. Partially satisfies Objective 6 of the General Education Requirements. F, S, Su

GLBL 2270 World Regional Geography and Cultures: 3 semester hours.

This course provides an introduction to world regions with an emphasis on geography scholarship, regional analysis, and spatial thinking skills. Students will learn more about the diversity of contemporary global cultures and environments and gain a deeper appreciation of world regions through their environmental, social, cultural, geopolitical, and economic characteristics. Satisfies Objective 9 of the General Education Requirements. F, S

GLBL 2285 Internship in Global Studies: 1-9 semester hours.

This course allows students to undertake a significant experiential learning opportunity, typically with a company, non-profit, governmental, or community-based organization. Through direct observation, reflection, and evaluation, students gain an understanding of the internship site's work, mission, and audience, and how these potentially relate to their academic study, as well as the organization's position in the broader industry or field. F, S, Su

GLBL 2299 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.

GLBL 3300 Travel and Study Abroad: 3-6 semester hours.

Travel and study abroad through student exchange programs and other supervised experience. PREREQ: Approval of the Director of International Studies. F, S, Su

GLBL 3301 Seminar in Global Studies: 3 semester hours.

Selected topics of international interest. May be repeated for up to 9 credits. D

GLBL 3348 European Union: Institutions & Global Impact: 3 semester hours.

The European Union has ensured peace and prosperity in Europe since the end of World War II. Today, it stands to tackle new challenges such as the refugee crisis, terrorism, and financial stability. The class addresses the emergence and development of the EU as well as the institutional and legal structure of the European Union and challenges it faces today. D

GLBL 3350 International Symposium: 1 semester hour.

Active participation in organizing the annual Frank Church Symposium for International Affairs, and attendance at the sessions. May be repeated for up to 8 credits. F, S

GLBL 3355 Global Governance: Superpowers and Globalization: 3 semester hours.

This course will help students understand how states, international organizations, and individuals work together to solve global problems and challenges. The class will look at the systems of rules, norms, and institutions. Surveying areas of global governance and the institutions utilized to manage common affairs, students will study areas of international cooperation such as human rights, disarmament, socioeconomic development, health, or environmental sustainability. At the end of the course, students will be able to critically assess the ability of international actors to tackle today's challenges. D

GLBL 3379 Environment and Geography: 3 semester hours.

This course examines the geography of human-environment issues. It presents spatial and thematic approaches to better understand natural resource availability, management, and use with an emphasis on water and land resources issues, landscape studies, natural hazards, and environmental conservation. D

GLBL 3380 Gender in Global Affairs (Issues and Impact): 3 semester hours.

This course critically examines the idea that international studies is gender-neutral and explore what it means to introduce gender as an analytical category both in terms of how we approach the study of global affairs and the impact of gendering global affairs on the lives of women around the globe. The course areas of international studies where women's lives and experience are specifically affected such as women in conflict and security, women's human rights, women and development, or sex and world peace. D

GLBL 3385 Internship in Global Studies: 1-9 semester hours.

This course allows students to undertake a significant experiential learning opportunity, typically with a company, non-profit, governmental, or community-based organization. Through direct observation, reflection, and evaluation, students gain an understanding of the internship site's work, mission, and audience, and how these potentially relate to their academic study, as well as the organization's position in the broader industry or field. F, S, Su

GLBL 3399 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.

GLBL 3400 Simulation for Global Affairs: 3 semester hours.

Ever wonder how international negotiations work and how international agreements are struck? In this course, students will participate in a series of mock negotiations to achieve the best outcome for the country they are representing. Students will gain insight into the many facets of global and domestic politics that influence a country?s decision on trade, conflict and war, or climate change among others. S

GLBL 4420 Global Health and Policy: 3 semester hours.

This course is an examination of global social constructions of health and healthcare focusing on issues such as beliefs, governmental policies, approaches to curative medicine, and gender notions and their impact on healthcare. It introduces students to the culture of different societies and the effects on health. The course provides insights on the impact of culture, politics, economies, and gender relations on health policies. Repeatable with different content. F, S, Su

GLBL 4444 Senior Seminar (various topics): 3 semester hours.

Upper level credits to support a comprehensive understanding of various issues in Global Studies. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. F, S, Su

GLBL 4466 Cultural Geography: 3 semester hours.

This course examines the spatial patterns, characteristics, and processes of human settlement on the earth using the tools, methods and perspective of the geographer. It utilizes a framework of five key themes in geographic inquiry including nature-culture, mobility, region, globalization, and cultural landscapes. D

GLBL 4470 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hours.

This course provides the student with an opportunity to participate in the creation of academic learning experiences geared to individual needs, interests, aptitudes and desired outcomes. Plans must be approved by an appropriate faculty member who supervises and grades the project outcomes (usually completed within one semester). F, S, Su

GLBL 4480 International Parks and Protected Areas: 3 semester hours.

This course is a survey of international parks and protected areas through the lens of geographic methods and inquiry. It traces the evolution of the national park idea from the U.S. to parks around the world, including the U.N. model of World Heritage Sites. Students will gain knowledge about world cultures, environments, and geopolitics as they relate to public lands ownership and management. D

GLBL 4485 Internship in Global Studies: 1-9 semester hours.

This course allows students to undertake a significant experiential learning opportunity, typically with a company, non-profit, governmental, or community-based organization. Through direct observation, reflection, and evaluation, students gain an understanding of the internship site's work, mission, and audience, and how these potentially relate to their academic study, as well as the organization's position in the broader industry or field. F, S, Su

GLBL 4488 Global Tourism Geography: 3 semester hours.

This course examines the geography of tourism, travel, and recreation around the world through the themes of place, space and environment. World travel destinations are explored as spaces of globalization, cultural heritage, and ecotourism. The course teaches students specific geographic knowledge so that they may develop a deeper understanding and empathy for cultural values and traditions that exist outside their own culture. PREREQ: GLBL 2270. D

GLBL 4490 Research Design and Methods: 3 semester hours.

Students will be introduced to all elements necessary to design and carry out a research project including finding a research topic and question, data collection and analysis, research methods, and research ethics. The resulting research prospectus will serve as the basis of a possible senior thesis. F, D

GLBL 4493 Senior Thesis/Capstone: 4 semester hours.

Global Studies majors can either write and present a senior thesis under direction of one of the faculty affiliated with the Global Studies Program or prepare and present a capstone project outlining how their learning outcomes from coursework and study abroad or internships line up with professional goals. F, S

GLBL 4499 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.