Teaching and Educational Studies

Chair & Associate Professor: Ntuli

Professors: Ray, Bennett

Associate Professors: Gallup, Ruchti

Assistant Professor: Perihan

Clinical Associate Professors: Lin, Eller

Clinical Assistant Professors: Bartle, Beasterfield, Radford

Clinical Instructor: Walters

Associate Lecturer: Schroeder

Clinical Lecturer: Toevs

Educational Specialist in School Psychology or Special EducationDegreeEd.S.
Master of Arts in TeachingDegreeM.A.
Master of Education in Early Childhood EducationDegreeM.Ed.
Master of Education in Elementary EducationDegreeM.Ed.
Master of Education in Secondary EducationDegreeM.Ed.
Master of Education in K-12 Education/Music EducationDegreeM.Ed.
Master of Education in Special EducationDegreeM.Ed.
Master of Education in LiteracyDegreeM.Ed.
Master of Science in Deaf EducationDegreeM.S.
Mathematics Consulting Teacher Endorsement

Master of Education in Elementary Education

The 30-credit (minimum) non-thesis master’s degree in Elementary Education is a combination of pedagogy and content, designed for the elementary school teacher. This degree will permit the practicing teacher to acquire greater depth in STEM (or single subject mathematics, geology, physical science, or biology), Mathematics Education, English as a Second Language (ESL), world languages, English/language arts, history/social science, Instructional Technology, Special Education, or another Idaho SBOE-approved elementary certification or endorsement area.

Mission

The Department of Teaching and Educational Studies seeks to graduate proficient and reflective educators who understand learners, content, and pedagogy.

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate knowledge and application of critical concepts and principles to their field of preparation. 
  2. Develop and demonstrate skills/practices in the application of critical concepts and principles to their field of preparation.
  3. Access and evaluate resources to advance their professional practice.
  4. Evaluate their own progress in developing as an advanced professional educator.

Preparation and Expectations 

During the undergraduate program, candidates take several foundational content courses, general subject courses, and pedagogical courses for initial certification, some of which are unrelated to their major. Graduate coursework in our program, on the other hand, is highly specialized to develop experts in elementary education. The Master of Education in Elementary curriculum enhances candidates’ expertise in grades K-8 by providing opportunities to develop as an instructional leader who influences the decision-making process in the candidate’s educational context. Through sequenced coursework, this is done by enhancing skills in data literacy; use of research and research methodologies with the use of data analysis to develop supportive, diverse, equitable, and inclusive school environments; as well further enhancing their knowledge of curriculum design and advanced assessment practices. Furthermore, candidates receive additional training for appropriate applications of technology. For the Master of Education in Elementary, candidates are expected to complete all coursework, collect appropriate artifacts for their culminating portfolio, complete an Action Research capstone project, all of which leads to an oral defense of their portfolio demonstrating their ability to apply new knowledge acquired from the program and showing the alignment of this portfolio to program outcomes and national standards.

Master of Education in Secondary Education

The 30-credit (minimum) non-thesis master's degree in Secondary Education is a combination of pedagogy and content, designed for the secondary school teacher. This degree will permit the practicing teacher, or certified teacher with past experience teaching, to acquire greater depth in STEM (or single subject mathematics, geology, physical science, or biology), mathematics education, English as a Second Language (ESL), world languages, English/language arts, history/social science, instructional technology, or another Idaho SBOE-approved secondary certification or endorsement area.

Mission

The Department of Teaching and Educational Studies seeks to graduate proficient and reflective educators who understand learners, content, and pedagogy.

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate knowledge and application of critical concepts and principles to their field of preparation.
  2. Develop and demonstrate skills/practices in the application of critical concepts and principles to their field of preparation. 
  3. Access and evaluate resources to advance their professional practice. 
  4. Evaluate their own progress in developing as an advanced professional educator.

Preparation and Expectations 

During the undergraduate program, candidates take several foundational content courses, general subject courses, and pedagogical courses for initial certification, some of which are unrelated to their major. Graduate coursework in our program, on the other hand, is highly specialized to develop experts in secondary education. The Master of Education in Secondary curriculum enhances candidates’ expertise in grades 6-12 by providing opportunities to develop as an instructional leader who influences the decision-making process in the candidate’s educational context. Through sequenced coursework, this is done by enhancing skills in data literacy; use of research and research methodologies with the use of data analysis to develop supportive, diverse, equitable, and inclusive school environments; as well further enhancing their knowledge of curriculum design and advanced assessment practices. Furthermore, candidates receive additional training for appropriate applications of technology. For the Master of Education in Secondary, candidates are expected to complete all coursework, collect appropriate artifacts for their culminating portfolio, complete an Action Research capstone project, all of which leads to an oral defense of their portfolio demonstrating their ability to apply new knowledge acquired from the program and showing the alignment of this portfolio to program outcomes and national standards.

Master of Education in K-12 Education

The Master of Education in Music Education is a degree program housed in the College of Education and presented in collaboration with the Department of Music. For admission into this program, apply first to the College of Education Department of Teaching and Educational Studies. The Master of Education in Music Education is designed to strengthen the student’s understanding, knowledge, and skills in three major areas — Core Professional Studies, Specialty Studies, and Integrative Field Research studies — as they relate to music education. The program is designed to meet the needs of music education specialists who work in the public school system (K-12) or who aspire to further graduate study and teaching in music education.

Mission

The Department of Teaching and Educational Studies seeks to graduate proficient and reflective educators who understand learners, content, and pedagogy.

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will be exposed to the history and development of Music Education in America.
  2. Students will develop best practices within the contexts of curriculum, pedagogy, and psychology of music and music teaching.
  3. Students will have the opportunity to create a Thesis which can be used to advance knowledge of an individual area of research.
  4. Students will be able to discuss current events in music education with emphasis on critical thinking and practice.

Preparation and Expectations 

The student must apply to and meet all criteria for admission to the Graduate School. In addition, applicants for the Master of Education in K-12 Education must meet all college requirements for admission and retention.

Individuals applying for admission to the Master of Education in Music Education must meet the following admission requirements:

  1. Bachelor’s degree in music from a regionally accredited college or university.
  2. It is expected that students will meet basic requirements for public school certification.
  3. Completion of entrance examinations in music history and music theory. Students whose examinations indicate deficiencies will be granted Classified (w/PR) Status. Any course used to remove deficiencies does not count toward the degree. When deficiencies have been removed, the student may seek Classified Status.

Master of Education in Special Education

The Master of Education in Special Education is designed to strengthen the student's understanding, knowledge, and skills in three major areas - Professional Studies, Specialty Studies, and Integrative Field Research Studies - as they relate to special education.

Mission

The Department of Teaching and Educational Studies seeks to graduate proficient and reflective educators who understand learners, content, and pedagogy.

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Develop knowledge of important research and theories regarding special education and evidence-based practice to support inclusion.
  2. Adapt a general curriculum by using a variety of instructional strategies and positive behavior interventions and supports (PBIS).
  3. Develop the skills necessary to deliver Special Education Services to students within a self-contained and inclusive environment. 
  4. Examine psychological based practices that can be applied to special education. 
  5. Apply pedagogical approaches to consider assessment, diversity, and exceptionality to support equitable access to the curriculum.
  6. Know and demonstrate advanced behavioral techniques and Applied Behavior Analysis interventions.

Preparation and Expectations 

During the undergraduate program, candidates take several foundational content courses to address and meet needs of children in both special and inclusive classroom settings. Graduate coursework in our program, on the other hand, is highly specialized to develop experts in special education, behavioral and related fields by providing a unique curriculum. The main goal of the Master of Education in Special  Education is preparing leaders and experts in the field  to provide best evidence-based strategies to improve educational and behavioral outcomes of children with special needs in  supportive, diverse, equitable, and inclusive school environments. Furthermore, candidates receive additional training for appropriate applications of high quality behavioral interventions based on Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) approach. In addition to being full-time teachers, candidates are expected to complete all coursework requirements associated with the Master of Education in Special Education including the action research capstone portfolio and oral defense. Students seeking Idaho certification in the area of their training must also meet the Idaho State Board of Education requirements for certification/licensure. 

Coursework is sequenced, starting with the core courses that develop the candidate’s learning theory and research skills, followed by pedagogical coursework. Specialized content course work is integrated across the program of study. Throughout the coursework, candidates collect artifacts for the capstone portfolio that demonstrate their ability to reflect on and apply new knowledge acquired from the program. This program can also lead to an Idaho endorsement for a Special Education Generalist teacher.

Master of Education in Literacy

The Master of Education in Literacy is designed to strengthen the student's understanding, knowledge, and skills in three major areas- Core Professional Studies, Specialty Studies, and Integrative Field Research Studies - as they relate to literacy education.

Mission

The Department of Teaching and Educational Studies seeks to graduate proficient and reflective educators who understand learners, content, and pedagogy.

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. The literacy specialist understands the "science of reading" and the importance of research, and utilizes research-based best practices.
  2. The literacy specialist understands the related nature of reading, writing, listening, speaking, and viewing.
  3. The literacy specialist understands that reading is a complex process involving multiple skills and systems of decoding, encoding, and constructing meaning.
  4. The literacy specialist understands the importance of building on strengths of individual learners rather than emphasizing needs. Candidates demonstrate knowledge of research, relevant theories, pedagogies, and essential concepts of diversity and equity. 
  5. The literacy specialist is able to support and expand student expression in speaking, writing, and creative art forms across subject matter areas.
  6. The literacy specialist is able to conduct assessment that involves multiple indicators of student progress and develop an instructional plan based on these indicators.
  7. The literacy specialist is prepared to serve as a literacy leader in the educational system.

Preparation and Expectations 

During the undergraduate program, candidates take several foundational content courses, general subject courses, and pedagogical courses for initial certification. Graduate coursework in our program, on the other hand, is highly specialized to develop experts in literacy education. The Master of Education in Literacy enhances candidates’ expertise in P-12 literacy by providing a curriculum that allows the candidates to develop in-depth understandings of the science of literacy and specialized skills in literacy instruction and assessment, as well as the opportunity to become literacy leaders who influence the decision-making process in their schools and districts. The program further enhances pedagogy and seeks to renew candidates’ passion for teaching literacy and leading in literacy. In addition to most candidates being full-time teachers, all candidates are expected to complete all coursework requirements associated with the Master of Education in Literacy, including the capstone case study and oral defense. 

Coursework includes core courses that develop the candidates’ understandings of learning theories and research skills; specialized courses that develop candidates’ literacy expertise; and integrative field research studies in which candidates complete a specialized literacy practicum and case study.

Master of Science in Deaf Education

The Master of Science in Deaf Education is a (32 credit) program designed to provide candidates with research based pedagogy and methodology to become change agents  providing instruction to Deaf/hard of hearing students in diverse academic settings. This program is in alignment with Idaho State University’s vision to ignite a passion for knowledge and discovery to create a better future for our students and the world.

Mission

The Department of Teaching and Educational Studies seeks to graduate proficient and reflective educators who understand learners, content, and pedagogy.

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Displays the dispositions of professional action and moral commitments that support Deaf/hard of hearing students’ social, emotional, behavioral, language, and academic development.
  2. Applies evidence-based professional and pedagogical knowledge that supports Deaf/hard of hearing students’ signed language development.
  3. Applies evidence-based professional and pedagogical knowledge that supports Deaf/hard of hearing students’ literacy development.
  4. Applies evidence-based professional and pedagogical knowledge that supports Deaf/hard of hearing students’ spoken language development (Deaf-centric approach)

Goal

Provide equitable employment opportunities for all candidates in the Masters of Deaf Education program by providing comprehensive research based training with emphasis on multilingual and bimodal teaching strategies.

Preparation and Expectations

During the undergraduate program, candidates will take courses to obtain proficiency in sign language skills (B- or higher in target language courses) and complete foundational courses in the teacher preparation program in chosen areas of emphasis (early childhood education, K-12 education, special education).  Candidates may complete undergraduate programs in related fields providing services to deaf/hard of hearing populations (social work, interpreting, etc.).  This may require additional coursework including the completion of necessary praxis exam(s) for teachers of deaf and hard of hearing students prior to their placement for student teaching. 

The Master of Science in Deaf Education program will build on skills learned in undergraduate programs and provide research based knowledge in specialized content areas related to Deaf/hard of hearing population utilizing critical pedagogy strategies, Universal Design of learning, and Multi-Tiered Systems of Support (MTSS). Emphasis will be given on providing language rich learning environments for students who are Deaf/hard of hearing in diverse educational settings. Candidates are responsible to know the requirements in their individual states to meet the standards set forth for teachers of Deaf/hard of hearing students. Candidates seeking Idaho certification in the area of their training must meet the Idaho State Board of Education requirement for certification/licensure.  

Coursework is offered fully online (both synchronous and asynchronous courses). Specialized content coursework is integrated across the program of study with emphasis on multilingual/bimodal methodologies, language planning and critical pedagogy. Candidates will complete a capstone project that includes completing action research and present a defense regarding their findings and action plan. This program can also lead to an Idaho endorsement for a Deaf/hard of hearing teacher.

Master of Arts in Teaching

The Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) is a non-thesis program designed to strengthen the pedagogical knowledge and skills of candidates seeking to leverage an existing bachelor's degree to become a K-12 teacher.

Mission

The Department of Teaching and Educational Studies seeks to graduate proficient and reflective educators who understand learners, content, and pedagogy.

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. The Teacher Candidate applies evidence-based professional and pedagogical knowledge that supports students’ social, emotional, behavioral and academic development.
  2. The Teacher Candidate has a deep and flexible understanding of content that supports students’ social, emotional, behavioral  and academic development in authentic learning environments.
  3. The Teacher Candidate strategically uses assessment for instructional planning and evidence-based instructional practices to make goal-directed decisions that support students’ social, emotional, behavioral and academic development.  
  4. The Teacher Candidate displays the habits of professional action and moral commitments that support students’ social, emotional, behavioral and academic development.

Preparation and Expectations 

During the undergraduate program, candidates take coursework in their content areas to address the content specialization for K-12 teaching.  Graduate coursework provides candidates with specialization in pedagogical knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge necessary to meet certification standards and requirements set by the Idaho State Board of Education.  In addition, candidates receive additional coursework to develop the candidate’s learning theory and research skills. 

Two different options are available leading to Idaho K-12 Teacher Certification, both requiring a bachelor's degree for admission. Neither requires any previous teaching experience. 

  1. Alternate Authorization:  This option is for teachers in the state of Idaho who have been hired without certification (emergency hires/alternative authorization). This option is completed within three years. 
  2. Traditional Option:  This option is for candidates with a bachelor's degree who would like to pursue Idaho teacher certification. This option can be completed in four semesters.

Additional Requirements for Certification

All candidates applying for certification must also submit a background check to the State Department of Education, pass the Idaho Content Literacy Assessment and pass the Praxis II exam appropriate to their endorsement area before student teaching. Candidates seeking certification in Career and Technical Education will have additional requirements for certification.

How to Read Course Descriptions

Deaf Education Grad Courses Courses

EDHH 5556 Psychosocial Aspects of Deafness: 3 semester hours.

Psychological, educational and social influences of the hearing community on deaf persons and the structure of the deaf community as a socio-cultural entity.

EDHH 6607 Directed Observation in Education of the Deaf: 1 semester hour.

Directed observations at multiple levels and reporting of casual interactions and diagnostic/intervention approaches by instructor with Deaf or hard of hearing individuals (minimal 150 clock hours). May be repeated up to 3 credits.

EDHH 6608 Communication Practicum: 2 semester hours.

Supervised experiences applying research and theory to language intervention practices for Deaf or hard of hearing individuals. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

EDHH 6609 Teaching Internship in Deaf Education: 1-3 semester hours.

Directed classroom and clinical teaching experience with Deaf or hard of hearing students under supervision. Minimum 250 clock hours at the level specialization. May be repeated up to 6 credits. Graded S/U. PREREQ: Approved application.

EDHH 6627 Literacy Curriculum in Deaf Education: 3 semester hours.

Theory, research and practices for teaching and assessing written language for Deaf and hard of hearing students. Applications of principles of language acquisition to reading and writing.

EDHH 6628 Curriculum Organization in Deaf Education: 3 semester hours.

Organizing, adapting and implementing curriculum across all areas to meet the special needs of Deaf or hard of hearing students. Includes assessment, behavior management, instructional technology, and individualized planning.

EDHH 6637 Foundations of Deaf Education: 2 semester hours.

A comprehensive study of the philosophies and theories that influence current practice and research in the education of Deaf or hard of hearing students.

EDHH 6651 Field Project or Case Study in Deaf Education: 1-3 semester hours.

A field project or case study is completed in conjunction with the field internship and/or education scenario. Written report and oral explication required. May be repeated up to 6 credits. Graded S/U.

EDHH 6658 Teaching Language to the Deaf: 3 semester hours.

Students gain theoretical and practical knowledge in the evaluation and habilitation of language/communication problems in Deaf and hard of hearing children and adolescents.

EDHH 6659 Teaching Academic Subjects to the Deaf: 3 semester hours.

Students gain theoretical and practical knowledge of how to teach academic subjects to the Deaf and hard of hearing children and individuals.

Education Courses

EDUC 5501 Content Area Literacy: 3 semester hours.

Synthesis of principles of language and literacy as a basis for teaching in all curriculum areas. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

EDUC 5519 Developmental Literacy: 3 semester hours.

Instructional strategies for reading, emphasizing early literacy and language development, phonemic awareness, phonics, word recognition strategies, comprehension and meta-linguistic awareness.

EDUC 5524 Assessing Literacy Abilities: 3 semester hours.

Methods of assessment in literacy. Introduction to case study, formal and authentic measures of comprehension, vocabulary, study strategies, and writing.

EDUC 5526 Remediation of Literacy Problems: 3 semester hours.

Teaching strategies for remediating problems in literacy. Emphasis on planning, implementing, and evaluating approaches and materials. PREREQ: EDUC 5524.

EDUC 5531 Methods of Teaching Science: 3 semester hours.

This course investigates the scope and sequence of the K-12 science curriculum, instructional strategies, and research into how students learn science. Strategies for teaching the Science and Engineering Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Disciplinary Core ideas and implementing the Idaho State Science Standards K-12 will be explored. Topics include laboratory and field safety, assessment, planning, discussions, integration of literacy and technology, and the adaptation of instructional strategies for use in the K-12 school science classroom. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

EDUC 5560 Foundations of ESL: 3 semester hours.

Study of ESL learner characteristics, historical, philosophical, cultural and linguistic foundations of ESL. Theories of language acquisition and those of leaders in the field will be included.

EDUC 5563 ESL Methods: 3 semester hours.

Language assessment, planning, and delivery for teaching limited English proficient K-12 students. Appropriate methods for students at various developmental stages of language acquisition will be studied. PREREQ: EDUC 5560.

EDUC 5564 ESL Practicum: 1 semester hour.

Field experience in settings with English as-a-Second-Language learners. COREQ: EDUC 5563 or permission of instructor.

EDUC 5570 Advanced Mathematics Methods: 3 semester hours.

Study of methods for teaching K-12 mathematics through the modern math approach stressing modeling, discourse, and reasoning. Consideration is given to instructional and curricular modifications to support all students. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

EDUC 5571 Interpersonal Communications: 2 semester hours.

Examination of basic concepts, principles, models, and theories of interpersonal communications and their application to educational settings.

EDUC 5581 Contemporary Issues in Education: 1-3 semester hours.

Examination and analysis of contemporary issues and trends in theories and practices in education.

EDUC 5582 Contemporary Issues in Education: 1-3 semester hours.

Examination and analysis of contemporary issues and trends in theories and practices in education.

EDUC 5583 Instructional Improvement for Teachers: 1-3 semester hours.

Study of ways by which teachers can improve instruction in their own classrooms with emphasis on the findings of research and experiences.

EDUC 5585 Independent Problems in Education: 1-3 semester hours.

Individual work under staff guidance. Field and/or library research on specific educational problems of interest to majors in education. Experience in research composition. May be repeated.

EDUC 5591 Seminar: 1-3 semester hours.

Critical analysis of the literature in one or more areas of education. Limited enrollment.

EDUC 5598P Prof Development Workshop: 3 semester hours.

New methods and opportunities to enhance and supplement skills. Subject to the approval of the Dean of the student's college, a maximum of eight credits earned in workshops may be applied toward a degree; students taking the courses only for personal development may choose the 0-credit option; those seeking professional development must choose a for-credit option.

EDUC 5599 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.

EDUC 6601 Research and Writing: 3 semester hours.

Examination of methods for designing/conducting research in education and related fields and of procedures for formal report writing using APA style and format.

EDUC 6602 Theories of Learning: 3 semester hours.

Advanced study of the psychology of human learning and instruction. Emphasis will be given to the application of contemporary theories of learning to instructional practice and the design of effective learning environments.

EDUC 6610 Applied Educational Statistics: 3 semester hours.

Application of parametric and nonparametric statistical procedures for summarizing and analyzing qualitative and quantitative measurement data in conducting research and for report writing in education and related fields. Covers descriptive statistics to single-factor experiments.

EDUC 6612 Learners and the Content: 3 semester hours.

Examination of curriculum scope and sequence within the context of varying learner needs. The course will focus on curriculum alignment with state and national standards and the connecting of content to learner characteristics and developmentally appropriate teaching practices. COREQ: EDUC 6602.

EDUC 6614 Pedagogy and Content Knowledge: 3 semester hours.

Investigation of the structure of subject matter knowledge and how it determines pedagogical content. The course will examine philosophical perspectives, models of teaching, and develop contemporary applications. PREREQ or COREQ: EDUC 6602.

EDUC 6618 Learning Communities: 3 semester hours.

Exploration of learning communities and examination regarding models for how they are created and sustained through curriculum leadership. The course includes such topics as parental involvement, curriculum for diverse learners, and collaborative teaching practices. PREREQ: EDUC 6612 and EDUC 6614.

EDUC 6620 Motivation for Learning: 3 semester hours.

Advanced study of theories and research on student motivation including strategies for linking motivation to classroom management and curriculum. Topics include individual differences, interpersonal motivation, self-motivation, and lifelong learning.

EDUC 6622 Educational Assessment and Evaluation: 3 semester hours.

Construction, administration and interpretation of educational assessments for the systematic analysis of student learning and teaching practice. Emphasis is placed on the use of assessment results in planning and valuation of curriculum leadership.

EDUC 6627 NBPTS Certification Part I: 3 semester hours.

Provides a framework for completion of the requirements for National Board for Professional Teaching Standards Certification. Examination of the standards and portfolio guidelines; provision of support and consultation in gathering and presenting documentation.

EDUC 6628 NBPTS Certification Part II: 3 semester hours.

Mentors and supports teachers through advanced National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. Development of classroom-based portfolio entries and preparation for assessment center exercises. PREREQ or COREQ: EDUC 6627.

EDUC 6630 Advanced Elementary Methods: 3 semester hours.

Advanced study of the subject content and teaching methods in grade K-8 programs. The course includes emphasis on development of materials, lesson planning, instructional strategies, assessment, and application of technology for information acquisition, analysis, and presentation by students and teacher.

EDUC 6631 Advanced Secondary Methods: 3 semester hours.

Advanced study of the subject content and teaching methods in grade 6-12 programs. The course includes emphasis on development of materials, lesson planning, instructional strategies, assessment and application of technology for information acquisition, analysis, and presentation by students and teacher.

EDUC 6632 Psychology of Literacy: 3 semester hours.

Examination of the nature of symbolic systems within the literacy field from the perspective of contemporary psychological science. Topics include decoding, lexical access, referential representation, and meta-cognition.

EDUC 6633 Language Literacy and Neurology: 3 semester hours.

Theories and principles based on research in psycholinguistics and neurophysiology as related to literacy.

EDUC 6634 Literacy Multicultural Views: 3 semester hours.

Theories and research in language acquisition and development across cultures including emphases on second language acquisition, dialects, and regionalisms affecting both oral and written codes.

EDUC 6635 Clinical Methods in Literacy: 3-6 semester hours.

Consulting, supervising, evaluating, writing case reports, and relating research and theories in literacy to clinical methods. May be repeated up to 6 credits. PREREQ: EDUC 5524, EDUC 5526 and EDUC 6633.

EDUC 6637 Leadership in Curriculum Development: 3 semester hours.

Development of the knowledge, skills, and disposition essential to effective curriculum leadership. While drawing on philosophy, the course focuses on the practical applications of leadership, including curriculum vision, development, management, and evaluation. PREREQ: EDUC 6618, EDUC 6620 and EDUC 6622.

EDUC 6638 Supervision of Interns and Student Teachers: 2 semester hours.

Role and responsibilities of supervisory personnel in the intern and student teaching programs including student orientation readiness, planning and techniques of instruction, and evaluation.

EDUC 6640 Workshop: 1-2 semester hours.

Special projects concerned with public school education. Meets for a minimum of 36 clock hours with appropriate outside assignments, lessons, or papers. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

EDUC 6641 Advanced Studies in K-12 Curriculum: 3 semester hours.

Advanced study of research and development of subject-specific curriculum in K-12 environments. Students will create a curriculum unit, demonstrating it as part of and sections will be established for each subject area.

EDUC 6648 Independent Problems in Education: 1-3 semester hours.

Individual work under staff guidance. Field and/or library research on specific educational problems of interest to graduate students in education. Experience in research composition. May be repeated up to 4 credits.

EDUC 6649 Seminar: 1-3 semester hours.

Critical analysis of the literature in one or more areas of education. Enrollment limited.

EDUC 6650 Thesis: 1-6 semester hours.

1-6 Credits. May be repeated. Graded S/U.

EDUC 6651 Field Project or Case Study in Education: 1-6 semester hours.

A field project or case study is completed in conjunction with a field practicum/internship in an educational setting. Written report and oral explication of the project or case study required. May be repeated. Graded S/U.

EDUC 6652 Field Practicum in Education: 1-6 semester hours.

Individually designed practicum in an educational setting. The length, placement, and learning experiences will be determined in consultation with the major advisor. Graded S/U.

EDUC 6670 Seminar in Elementary Education: 3 semester hours.

Examination of research and current issues in Elementary Education. Seminar format requires readings, discussions, written assignments, and presentations.

EDUC 6671 Seminar in Secondary Education: 3 semester hours.

Examination of research and current issues in Secondary Education. Seminar format requires active participation in readings, discussion, written assignments, and presentations.

EDUC 6675 Curriculum Project: 3 semester hours.

Completion of a curriculum project within the context of a supportive learning community, or for those teachers who have achieved National Board Certification, submission of the portfolio.

EDUC 6676 Evaluation Research Practicum: 3 semester hours.

Supervised on-going assessment of curriculum projects and the systematic evaluation of their implementation in educational settings or, for those teachers who have achieved National Board Certification, content analysis of the portfolio. Each student will complete an independent curriculum evaluation project.

EDUC 6699 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.

Special Educ Courses

SPED 5523 Designing Instruction: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to instructional design principles and strategies for engaging students in higher order thinking and problem-solving. Emphasis on teaching complex concepts in reading comprehension, writing, mathematics and other academic subjects.

SPED 5524 Assessment Procedures in Special Education: 3 semester hours.

Introductory study of diagnostic assessment techniques and the writing of individual educational, behavioral prescriptions, and instructional objectives which are required to provide interventions suitable for remediating the learning programs in basic school curricula. PREREQ: SPED 3330 and SPED 4441 or permission of instructor.

SPED 5526 Assessment Severe Disabilities: 3 semester hours.

Selection, administration, and interpretation of criterion-referenced tools employed with severely disabled students. Emphasizes functional approach to assessment and evaluation of behavioral and instructional domains.

SPED 5527 Precision Teaching: 1 semester hour.

Techniques of data collection, charting, and decision making in the educational programs of children with disabilities.

SPED 5529 Strategies Severe Disabilities: 3 semester hours.

Consideration and evaluation of curriculum materials from behavioral, developmental, and ecological perspectives. Emphasizes functional approach to development and implementation of individualized intervention plans.

SPED 5532 Direct Instruction Systems: 3 semester hours.

This course provides mastery level skills training in direct instruction systems for reading, math, and written language. Includes field work, adaptation of curricula to direct instruction model and evaluation.

SPED 5533 The Emotionally Disturbed Child: 3 semester hours.

Survey of the causes of emotional disturbance in children and the effects upon the child's school performance and achievement. School programs and treatment considerations will be reviewed.

SPED 5538 Policies and Procedures in Special Education: 3 semester hours.

Consideration of legal background, current court ruling, professional responsibilities, and models for consultation and collaboration in a variety of educational settings. Includes the IEP process.

SPED 5540 Biomedical Aspects of Physical Disability: 2 semester hours.

Study of the causes, treatments, and educational implications of physical and neurological disorders of genetically and orthopedically disabled children.

SPED 5543 Autism: 2 semester hours.

An overview of autism and implications for educational planning. Teaching strategies that are successful in working with individuals who have autism will be reviewed.

SPED 5546 Secondary Special Education: 3 semester hours.

Teaching methodology focusing on needs of secondary and adult special education students. Topics include functional academics, transition, independent living, social skills, vocational training employment options, and accessing community resources.

SPED 5548 Pre-practicum Moderately Handicapped: 1-3 semester hours.

Supervised practical work with moderately handicapped children in a clinical setting. May be repeated.

SPED 5550 Creating Inclusive Classrooms: 3 semester hours.

Curricula and methods for educating students with disabilities in general education classrooms. Emphasizes inclusive lesson design, curricular adaptations, and collaborative teaching.

SPED 5562 Advanced Issues in Behavior Disorders: 2 semester hours.

Study of educational organization, collaboration and consultation skills necessary to provide integrated service for this exceptionality.

SPED 5580 Seminar in Special Education: 1-2 semester hours.

Current topics in the field of special education by departmental faculty and guest lecturers. May be repeated for a total of 2 credits.

SPED 5581 Seminar Behavior Disorders: 1 semester hour.

Covers topical issues related to the education of children with behavior disorders in a variety of educational and therapeutic settings. May be repeated.

SPED 5585 Independent Problems: 1-3 semester hours.

Individual work under staff guidance. Field and/or library research on specific educational problems of interest to majors in education. Experience in research composition. May be repeated.

SPED 5591 Seminar: 1-3 semester hours.

Critical analysis of the literature in one or more areas of education. Limited enrollment. May be graded S/U or on a letter-grade basis in separate sections.

SPED 5598 Advanced Fieldwork: 1-3 semester hours.

Orientation, observation, planning and implementation of special education instruction in a special education setting in the public schools.

SPED 5599 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.

SPED 6630 Professional Development in Special Education: 2 semester hours.

Issues related to the professional role of the master's-degree-level special educator, including professional societies, history, philosophical and humanistic foundations.

SPED 6632 Administration of Special Education: 2 semester hours.

Supervision of special education, including the organization, financing, equipping, housing, and staffing of educational facilities for exceptional children. Also includes legal provisions relevant to special education.

SPED 6633 The Behaviorally Maladjusted Child: 3 semester hours.

Comprehensive study of the characteristics, learning problems, educational organizations, and teaching competencies for this exceptionality. PREREQ: SPED 4441.

SPED 6634 The Mentally Gifted Child: 3 semester hours.

Physical, mental, emotional, and social characteristics of the mentally gifted;teaching procedures, types of organization, analysis of educational need, and curricula material used in their education.

SPED 6636 Medical and Health Issues in Special Education: 2 semester hours.

Consideration of medical and health issues, problems, and practices as they pertain to children with disabilities in hospital-, home-, and school-based programs.

SPED 6638 Practicum in Special Education: 2-8 semester hours.

Individual observation, program development, and supervised practice in the development of teaching competencies for the education of exceptional children. A combination of fifty hours of experience and supervision equals one hour of academic credit.

SPED 6639 Internship in Special Education: 3-12 semester hours.

A combination of fifty hours of experience and supervision equals one hour of academic credit. PREREQ: SPED 6638.

SPED 6650 Thesis: 1-6 semester hours.

1-6 Credits. May be repeated. Graded S/U.

SPED 6651 Masters Paper: 1-3 semester hours.

A paper involving extensive familiarity with research findings written under the supervision of a faculty member in the department. May be repeated. Graded S/ U

SPED 6652 Specialist Paper: 1-3 semester hours.

A paper involving extensive familiarity with research finding under the supervision of a faculty member of the program, consisting of applied research activity in the field of special education written in format appropriate for publication consideration by a peer-reviewed journal.

SPED 6658 Independent Problems: 1-3 semester hours.

Individual work under staff guidance. Field and/or library research on specific educational problems. Experience in research composition. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

SPED 6659 Seminar: 1-3 semester hours.

Critical analysis of the literature in one or more areas ofeducation. Enrollment limited. May be repeated up to 8 credits.

SPED 6662 Consultation in Schools: 2 semester hours.

Provides theoretical and practical experience in the development, implementation, and evaluation of a variety of consulting strategies suitable for working with teachers, administrators, community agencies, and parents.

SPED 6699 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.

SPED 7758 Independent Problems: 2-4 semester hours.

Individual work under staff guidance. Field and/or library research on specific educational problems. Experience in research composition. May be repeated up to 8 credits.

SPED 7759 Ed.S Internship: 1-9 semester hours.

Placement in a post-master's degree counseling, school psychology, or special education setting. A combination of fifty hours of experience and supervision equals one hour of academic credit. May be repeated.