Anthropology (ANTH)

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Courses

ANTH 1100 Discover Anthropology: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to fields of anthropology: physical anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, and ethnology, and to biological and cultural development of humans. Partially satisfies Objective 6 of the General Education Requirements. F, S, Su

ANTH 1102 Cultural Anthropology: 3 semester hours.

Explores cultural and biocultural behavior including cross cultural examination of enculturation, culture and personality, social organization, kinship and marriage, economics, politics, and ideology. Focus on cultural dynamics and contemporary issues in cultural anthropology. Partially satisfies Objective 6 of the General Education Requirements.F, S

ANTH 1107 Nature of Language: 3 semester hours.

General survey of structure and use of language. Topics include language origins, descriptive and historical linguistics, language and culture, and history of the English language. Equivalent to ENGL 1107 and LANG 1107. Satisfies Objective 7 of the General Education Requirements. S

ANTH 1199 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.

ANTH 2201 Intermediate Shoshoni I: 4 semester hours.

Intermediate communication skills and grammar of Shoshoni. Deepens understanding of Shoshoni culture and builds on skills and knowledge gained in Elementary Shoshoni. Equivalent to SHOS 2201. PREREQ: ANTH/SHOS 1102 or equivalent. Satisfies Objective 9 of the General Education Requirements. F

ANTH 2202 Intermediate Shoshoni II: 4 semester hours.

Intermediate communication skills and grammar of Shoshoni. Deepens understanding of Shoshoni culture and builds on skills and knowledge gained in Elementary Shoshoni. Equivalent to SHOS 2202. PREREQ: ANTH 2201 or equivalent. Satisfies Objective 9 of the General Education Requirements. S

ANTH 2203 Discover Archaeology: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to basic methods, data and concepts of archaeology. F, S.

ANTH 2206 Indigenous Traditional Parenting: 3 semester hours.

Using the traditional knowledge of a Shoshoni language speaker, course is based in language and philosophy. Includes concepts of personhood, relations between parent and child, and the philosophy and use of childcare artifacts such as cradleboards. F

ANTH 2210 Conversational Shoshoni: 3 semester hours.

Refresher in Shoshoni words and phrases for those with previous exposure to the language and culture. S

ANTH 2212 Introduction to Folklore and Oral Tradition: 3 semester hours.

Folklore genres and folk groups, including introductory experience in folklore fieldwork focused on study of a genre or group of genres within verbal, customary, or material culture. Equivalent to ENGL 2212. Satisfies Objective 9 of the General Education Requirements. R1

ANTH 2230 Biological Anthropology: 3 semester hours.

Survey of human origins and biological variation through the study of adaptation, heredity, nonhuman primates, and the fossil record. Particular attention is paid to teaching students to apply the knowledge they have gained in the critical analysis of hypothetical frameworks common to the discipline. COREQ: ANTH 2230L. Partially satisfies Objective 5 of the General Education Requirements. F, S

ANTH 2230L Biological Anthropology Lab: 1 semester hour.

A lab section accompanying ANTH 2230. The lab section will focus on applying the knowledge gained in class with particular attention paid to applying the scientific method, critical thinking skills, data gathering, and analysis in a laboratory setting. COREQ: ANTH 2230 Partially satisfies Objective 5 of the General Education Requirements. F, S

ANTH 2233 Sex and Human Evolution: 3 semester hours.

Examination of worldwide variation in human sexuality from an anthropological and evolutionary perspective. D

ANTH 2234 Forensic Anthropology - Beyond Bones: 3 semester hours.

Forensic Anthropology will take you beyond learning about bones and delve deeper into what makes forensic anthropology the science of the future. Students will learn basic osteology, forensic archaeology, forensic sciences, and creation of the biological profile. This class will include sections on forensic anthropologists' role in mass disasters, recovery of our fallen war heroes, and trial experience. This course will teach students about the future of forensic anthropology in the United States, both in research as well as in practice, and what career paths there are for students after graduation. F, D

ANTH 2235 Introduction to Forensic Sciences - Fundamentals: 3 semester hours.

An overview of the forensic sciences that create the main component of any crime lab and are fundamental to any crime scene tech toolkit. Topics include crime scene and criminal investigations, firearms, evidence handling, forensic pathology and anthropology, toxicology and DNA. F, D

ANTH 2237 Peoples and Cultures of the Old World: 3 semester hours.

Examination of human social and cultural diversity from different parts of the Old World. Topics include social structure, ecology, religion, politics, and language. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. Satisfies Objective 9 of the General Education Requirements. D

ANTH 2238 Peoples and Cultures of the New World: 3 semester hours.

Examination of the human, social, and cultural diversity from different parts of the New World. Topics include social structure, ecology, religion, politics, and language. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. Satisfies Objective 9 of the General Education Requirements. F, S

ANTH 2239 Latino Peoples and Cultures: 3 semester hours.

Examination of the human, social and cultural diversity among Latino people in different regions of the world. Topics include ethnicity, health and healing, social structure, ecology, religion, politics, prehistory and language. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. Satisfies Objective 9 of the General Education Requirements. F, S

ANTH 2258 Native American History: 3 semester hours.

Assesses diversity of North American natives, their life and thought; European impact; federal policy; and natives' response to continual cultural and physical assault. Equivalent to HIST 2258. D

ANTH 2299 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.

ANTH 3301 Introduction to Shoshoni Folklore: 3 semester hours.

Survey of Shoshoni beliefs, customs, music, dance and various genres of oral tradition including tales, legends and myths. Includes the material manifestations of Shoshoni culture, including arts and crafts, costuming and folk technology. R1

ANTH 3367 Language in the United States: 3 semester hours.

A survey of the languages of the United States (American Indian languages, immigrant languages, and ethnic and regional varieties of English) along with the social and political aspects of American language use. Equivalent to ENGL 3367. PREREQ: ANTH/LANG/ENGL 1107. D

ANTH 3399 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.

ANTH 4401 History and Theory of Sociocultural Anthropology: 3 semester hours.

Survey of the development of anthropology, various schools of thought, important personalities, and concepts that have contributed to anthropology over time. PREREQ: ANTH 1102 or permission of instructor. S

ANTH 4402 Ecological Anthropology: 3 semester hours.

Interaction of human bio-cultural systems and environment. Relations of natural resources, technological inventories, social organization, cultural categories. Native resource management practices. D

ANTH 4403 History and Theory of Archaeology: 3 semester hours.

History of the development of current methods and theory in archaeology and contemporary applications. PREREQ: ANTH 2203 or permission of instructor. F

ANTH 4404 Material Culture Analysis: 3 semester hours.

Methods and analyses used in archaeology and anthropology to understand the relationship between objects and culture. PREREQ: ANTH 2203 or permission of instructor. COREQ: ANTH 4405. D

ANTH 4405 Analytical Techniques Laboratory: 1 semester hour.

Analytical techniques laboratory to accompany ANTH 4404. Students will complete an assigned project in material culture analysis. PREREQ: ANTH 2203 or permission of instructor. COREQ: ANTH 4404. D

ANTH 4406 American Indian Health Issues: 3 semester hours.

An overview of health concerns, both current and past, of American Indian people, and the biological and sociocultural factors which influence health status. PREREQ: Permission of instructor. AF

ANTH 4407 Anthropology of Global Health: 3 semester hours.

How cultures define health and illness, and how these definitions ultimately influence the health status of individuals. F

ANTH 4408 Topics in Medical Anthropology: 3 semester hours.

Rotating topics, including international health issues, ethno-psychiatry, ethnomedicine and non-western healing systems. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. PREREQ: Permission of instructor. D

ANTH 4409 Clinical Medical Anthropology: 3 semester hours.

Explores the culture of biomedicine and the beliefs of patients. Topics include doctor/patient communication, cultural competency, cultural construction of risk, critiques of high-tech medicine and the international pharmaceutical industry. S

ANTH 4410 Cultural Resources Management: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to CRM reviewing historic preservation and federal legislation as they pertain to archaeology; practical experience in site survey and recording. PREREQ: ANTH 2203 or permission of instructor. D

ANTH 4411 Advanced Global Health: 3 semester hours.

This class uses medical anthropology theories and approaches to explore and analyze current global health issues. Emphasis is on trans-disciplinary approaches to understanding and problem solving. The class content reflects current, on-going global health crises. ANTH 2239 or ANTH 4407/ANTH 5507 are recommended but not required requisites. D

ANTH 4412 Special Topics in Archaeology: 3 semester hours.

Rotating topics, including geoarchaeology, lithic analysis, and faunal analysis. May be repeated for up to 6 credits with different course topics. D

ANTH 4413 Old World Archaeology: 3 semester hours.

Prehistory of the Old World. Precise areal focus and periods may vary. Includes both theory and exposition. May be repeated for up to 6 credits with different course topics. PREREQ: ANTH 2203 or permission of instructor. D

ANTH 4414 New World Archaeology: 3 semester hours.

Examination of the prehistory of the Americas with emphasis on the North American Continent. May be repeated for up to 6 credits with different course topics. PREREQ: ANTH 2203 or permission of instructor. D

ANTH 4420 Applied Anthropology: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the use of theories, methods, practices, and ethnographic findings of anthropology to solve human and environmental problems in academic, professional and global contexts. Special emphasis on future research and anthropological career trajectories. ANTH 1102 is recommended as a prerequisite. D

ANTH 4422 Globalization: 3 semester hours.

An examination of issues surrounding the intersection of anthropology and globalization. Emphasis on the social scientific study of the intensity of flows of capital, labor, commodities, and ideologies across national borders. Cultural, political, and economic connections and transformations are interpreted through an ethnographic lens. D

ANTH 4425 Food and Culture: 3 semester hours.

A global examination of the role of food in human culture as a necessity and symbolic reflection of cultural processes. Among topics considered are the ways food shapes identity, culinary meaning and belief, development and change of food habits through cultural interaction, identity, ritual uses of food, taboos, diet, health, and globalization, drawing on historical and modern case studies. D

ANTH 4426 Reading and Writing Ethnography: 3 semester hours.

This course explores both contemporary and historical ethnographic writings that are foundational to the discipline. Students also engage in learning the art of ethnographic writing by producing short pieces of their own during the semester. ANTH 1102 or ANTH 2239 recommended as a prerequisite. D

ANTH 4427 Anthropology of Sex: 3 semester hours.

This course provides an introduction to sexuality studies drawing from history, sociology, and anthropology's four subfields. The course covers the biological aspects of sex including anatomy, reproduction, copulatory patterns and attractiveness; and the socio-cultural aspects of sexuality including marriage patterns, erotic plasticity, homosexuality, and masculinity and femininity. D

ANTH 4429 Survey of Primates: 3 semester hours.

Evolution and adaptations of fossil and extant non-human primates through their anatomy, behavioral ecology, and adaptive diversity, including a history of primate/human interactions. D

ANTH 4430 Human Evolution: 3 semester hours.

Examines relevant topical issues/problems in human evolution from a bioanthropological, ecological and demographic perspective, including paleoanthropology, evolutionary genetics, and the impact of health, nutrition and disease in human populations. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. PREREQ: ANTH 2230 or permission of instructor. D

ANTH 4431 Special Topics in Biological Anthropology: 3 semester hours.

Rotating review of topics dealing with issues in biological anthropology. May be repeated for up to 9 credits with different course topics. D

ANTH 4432 Human Osteology: 3 semester hours.

Provides a comprehensive, working knowledge of the human skeletal system presented in a laboratory context, including identification of individual bones, osteogenesis, pathologies, demography and the applications of knowledge and techniques in real world settings. PREREQ: ANTH 2230 or permission of instructor. D

ANTH 4434 Forensic Anthropology and Archaeology: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to forensic anthropology and archaeology, an applied field within the larger discipline of biological anthropology. This course includes analysis of human skeletal remains recovered from medico-legal contexts. Students will apply the theoretical foundations and methodologies associated with forensic anthropology and archaeology in a real world setting, and will provide students with an informed appreciation for the field, as well as knowledge regarding the roles, responsibilities, and limitations of a forensic anthropologist. ANTH 2230 and ANTH 4432 recommended as prerequisites. S, D

ANTH 4435 Forensic Anthroplogy: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to forensic anthropology and archaeology, an applied field within the larger discipline of biological anthropology. This course includes analysis of human skeletal remains recovered from medico-legal contexts. Students will apply the theoretical foundations and methodologies associated with forensic anthropology and archaeology in a real world setting, and will provide students with an informed appreciation for the field, as well as knowledge regarding the roles, responsibilities, and limitations of a forensic anthropologist. ANTH 2230 and ANTH 4432 recommended as prerequisites.

ANTH 4436 Human Variation: 3 semester hours.

This senior level course is designed to investigate the biological basis of human diversity, the meanings we apply to race, and how race is perceived. Topics covered include the origin and mechanisms of human population variation, the nature of racial and racist studies in both historical and social contexts, and the question of race as a valid subject of scientific inquiry. D

ANTH 4438 Human Growth and Development: 3 semester hours.

This course covers the phenomenon of human growth, how growth and development can be measured, the molecular basis of growth, secular changes, genetic and environmental effects on growth, plasticity of the human phenotype, and applications to forensic age estimation in subadults. ANTH 2230 is recommended as a prerequisite. D

ANTH 4439 Principles of Taphonomy: 3 semester hours.

Effects of processes which modify organisms between death and the time the usually fossilized remains are studied. Emphasis on vertebrates. Equivalent to BIOL 4439 and GEOL 4439. PREREQ: Permission of instructor. AS

ANTH 4449 Qualitative Research Methods: 3 semester hours.

Study of the methods of field work and analysis in sociocultural anthropology; design of field studies; data types; techniques for collection and analysis of empirical data; report writing; experimental field projects. AF

ANTH 4450 Sociolinguistics: 3 semester hours.

Study of the patterned covariation of language and society, social dialects and social styles in language; problems of bilingualism, multilingualism, creoles and language uses. Equivalent to ENGL 4488. PREREQ: ANTH 1107, ENGL 2280 or ENGL 2281, or permission of instructor. F

ANTH 4452 American Indian Verbal Arts: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of current theories in the study of oral literature and ethnopoetics, focusing on the oral traditions of American Indians. PREREQ: ANTH 1107 or permission of instructor. AF

ANTH 4453 American Indian Literature: 3 semester hours.

Considers literary works by and about North American native people, especially in relationship to history, genre, and culture, including oral traditions. Equivalent to ENGL 4453. PREREQ: Objective 1. R2

ANTH 4454 Survey of American Indian Languages: 3 semester hours.

History of scholarship, analysis and classification of American Indian languages with emphasis on the languages of a particular phylum or geographical area. REREQ: ANTH 1107 or permission of instructor. AF

ANTH 4455 Phonetics: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to descriptive linguistics focusing on the phonetics and phonetic phenomena of English and the other languages of the world. Extensive practice in perception and production of such phenomena. Equivalent to LANG 4455. PREREQ: ANTH/ENGL/LANG 1107. D

ANTH 4456 Phonology and Morphology: 3 semester hours.

Phonological theory and analysis; current theories in morphology. Phonological rules, representations, underlying forms, derivations, justifications of phonological analyses; morphological structure, derivational and inflectional morphology; relation of morphology to phonology. Equivalent to LANG 4456. PREREQ: ANTH/ENGL/LANG 1107. D

ANTH 4457 Survey of Indo European Languages: 3 semester hours.

Survey of Indo-European languages from ancient to modern times, their relationships to one another, and chief characteristics. Equivalent to LANG 4457. PREREQ: Completion of Objective 9. D

ANTH 4458 Historical Linguistics: 3 semester hours.

The methods and theories of the historical study of language. The comparative method, internal reconstruction, linguistic change over time, genetic typology of languages, and applications to prehistory. PREREQ: ANTH 1107. AS

ANTH 4459 Linguistic Field Methods: 3 semester hours.

Practical experience in linguistic analysis of a language using data elicited from a native speaker. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. PREREQ: ANTH 4456 or permission of instructor. D

ANTH 4463 Applied Statistics in Anthropology: 3 semester hours.

Practical applications of commonly used statistical analyses in anthropology. PREREQ: MATH 1153 or permission of instructor. AF

ANTH 4464 Analytical Methods: 4 semester hours.

Examination of and practical experience in applying advanced quantitative, qualitative, and laboratory methods and analyses. May be taken for up to 6 credits. PREREQ: ANTH 4463 or permission of instructor. D

ANTH 4472 Native American Arts: 3 semester hours.

Survey of Native American arts and industries, including prehistoric, ethnographic, and contemporary venues. PREREQ: ANTH 2238. D

ANTH 4474 Topics in Indian Education: 3 semester hours.

Rotating review of topics dealing with issues in Indian education. Consult current schedule of classes for exact course being taught. D

ANTH 4478 Federal Indian Laws: 3 semester hours.

Examination of tribal governments; their relationship with the federal government; sovereignty, jurisdictional conflicts over land and resources; and economic development. Equivalent to POLS 4478. D

ANTH 4479 Tribal Governments: 3 semester hours.

Complex legal position of Indian tribes as self-governing entities; principles of inherent powers; governmental organization, lawmaking, justice, relation to state and federal government. Equivalent to POLS 4479. D

ANTH 4480 Varieties of American English: 3 semester hours.

In-depth study of various dialects of American English, including historical evolution of different dialects, effects of migration on dialects, and influences of non-English immigrant languages on development of American English. Field-work studying the Snake River dialects of Idaho. Equivalent to ENGL 4480. PREREQ: ANTH/LANG/ENGL 1107. D

ANTH 4481 Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology: 3 semester hours.

Selected topics in social, political, economic, and religious sytems/organization. Intensive suvey of literature and analysis of relevant materials. See current schedule of classes for exact course titles. May be repeated for up to 9 credits with different course topics. PREREQ: Upper division status or permission of instructor. D

ANTH 4482 Independent Problems in Anthropology: 1-3 semester hours.

Investigation of an anthropological problem chosen by the student and approved by the staff. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. PREREQ: Permission of instructor. D

ANTH 4483 Field Research: 3 semester hours.

Practical experience in field research. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. PREREQ: Permission of instructor. D

ANTH 4484 Rotating Topics in Linguistics: 3 semester hours.

Rotating topics in different areas of linguistics and linguistic analysis. Consult current schedule of classes for exact course being taught. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. Equivalent to ENGL 4484 and LANG 4484. PREREQ: ANTH/ENGL/LANG 1107 or ENGL 2280 or ENGL 2281. D

ANTH 4485 Anthropology of War and Violence: 3 semester hours.

Survey of war and violence from its evolutionary foundations through its modern representations. History and ethnography of violent conflict around the world. PREREQ: Any upper division Social Science course. AS

ANTH 4486 Archaeology Field School: 1-6 semester hours.

Practical field and laboratory training in archaeological excavation techniques and methods of analysis. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. PREREQ: ANTH 2203 or permission of instructor. Su

ANTH 4487 Ethnographic Field School: 1-6 semester hours.

Supervised fieldwork in cultural anthropology in a given ethnographic setting where students and faculty work on a specific set of field problems. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. PREREQ: ANTH 1102 and ANTH 4449 or permission of instructor. D

ANTH 4489 Topics in American Indian Studies: 3 semester hours.

Rotating review of topics dealing with issues in American Indian studies. Consult current schedule of classes for exact course being taught. May be repeated with different content. D

ANTH 4490 Topics in Folklore: 3 semester hours.

Focused study of an issue in folkloristics or a particular genre of folklore, including history of the scholarship concerning that issue or genre. Rotating topics. May be repeated for up to 9 credits with different topics. Equivalent to ENGL 4490. R1

ANTH 4491 Archaeology Laboratory Analysis: 3 semester hours.

Directed analysis of archaeological remains and report writing. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. PREREQ: Permission of instructor. F, S

ANTH 4492 Senior Seminar: 3 semester hours.

Integration and application of anthropological theories and methods to current research issues. PREREQ: ANTH 4401 or permission of instructor. S

ANTH 4494 Visual Anthropology: 3 semester hours.

Documentary and ethnographic filmmaking techniques including story structure, interviewing, audio and lighting, camera handling, composition, POV, and editing. Anthropological critiques of visual representation. Students create their own short film for a final project. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. F

ANTH 4495 Department Colloquium: 1 semester hour.

Presentations of current research issues in Anthropology by faculty and students. S

ANTH 4499 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.