Business

Shane Hunt, Ph.D., Dean

Department of Accounting and Information Systems

Chair and Professor: Picard

Associate Professor: Konicek, Bagley, Leffler

Assistant Professors: Boyle, Fitch, Peterson, Thompson, Wood

Department of Informatics

Chair and Associate Professor: Houghton

Professor: Ottaway, Parker

Assistant Professors: Holmes

Department of Finance & Economics

Chair and Associate Professor: Buder

Professors: Brookman, Byers, Hackert, Khang, Stegner, R. Tokle

Associate Professors: Geisler

Department of Management & Marketing

Chair and Professor: Tocher

Professors: Hunt, Murphy, Smith, J. Tokle, Bolinger

Associate Professors: Street, Burch

Assistant Professors: Hanson, Ney, Peterson, Rose

Health Care Administration Program

Associate Professors:  Farnsworth, Guo

Assistant Professor: Thompson

Master of AccountancyDegreeM.Acc.
Master of Business AdministrationDegreeM.B.A.
Master of Healthcare AdministrationDegreeM.H.A.
MBA and PharmD Joint Degree ProgramDegreeMBA/PharmD

Master of Business Administration

The College of Business (COB) at Idaho State University (ISU) offers a Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree to holders of business and non-business bachelor’s degrees. The MBA program is accredited by AACSB International, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. In addition to the traditional MBA degree, the program offers MBA degrees with emphasis areas in Accounting, Athletic Administration, Informatics, Finance, Health Care Administration (HCA), Project Management, and Marketing. The MBA program at Idaho State University was the first to be accredited by the AACSB in the State of Idaho and remains committed to the delivery of a high-quality, rigorous program.

The traditional MBA provides a broad general degree particularly suited to those pursuing a managerial focus in their careers. The Accounting, Athletic Administration, Informatics, Finance, Health Care Administration, Project Management, and Marketing options provide specialized knowledge relating to their respective fields. The Accounting emphasis meets the needs of students who wish to satisfy requirements for certification as public accountants (CPA) or certification as management accountants (CMA).

In the interest of a more diverse student body, the college encourages and attracts a number of full-time students from other parts of the United States and foreign countries.

Mission and Goals

The Idaho State University MBA program's mission is to develop and deliver programs that address the diverse needs of stakeholders.

Our primary mission is to offer an MBA program that enhances our students' competence in business management, fosters their intellectual curiosity, and develops the personal skills necessary to be an effective manager. The MBA program prepares students for leadership roles in all areas of business requiring skilled and ethical decision-making and analytical abilities.

Program Goals

MBA Students should develop:

  • Communication and collaboration skills.
  • Skill in critical analysis, problem-solving, and decision-making.
  • Competency in key business concept areas.
  • Insight into cultural, global, and ethical issues in business.

The MBA Program

The MBA program consists of seven core courses (MBA-I) covering basic knowledge skills and concepts, a core of eight broad integrative courses (MBA-II), plus nine hours of additional graduate-level courses depending upon the student's program of study.

The MBA-I core develops a broad competence in the functional fields of business: Accounting, Economics, Management, Marketing, Operations, Finance, and Statistics. The core also examines behavioral, international, ethical, industry analysis, and strategic issues that cut across the functional boundaries and provide a basic educational background. Students with undergraduate degrees in business may have MBA-I classes waived.

The MBA-II core consists of seven required courses which, although anchored in traditional functional fields, are designed to provide a strong integrative focus building upon the competencies developed in MBA-I courses.

The traditional MBA degree requires nine credit hours of graduate College of Business coursework beyond the MBA-II core courses. The various emphases require nine credit hours of graduate coursework beyond the MBA-II core courses in the specific emphasis field. The courses in the Accounting, Athletic Administration, Economics, Finance, Health Care Administration, Informatics, Marketing, and Project Management areas of emphasis are designed to provide specialized knowledge specific to each of their respective fields.

Master of Accountancy

The Master of Accountancy (MAcc) provides students with advanced analytical and technical skills and tools required for success in the complex world of accounting today. The program develops skills and competencies well beyond that of an undergraduate accounting degree and will prepare students to enter the public accounting profession and provide a solid foundation for passing the rigorous CPA professional examination.

A tax emphasis provides students with advanced analytical and technical skills and tools required for success in the complex world of taxation. The emphasis develops skills and competencies related to taxation well beyond that of an undergraduate accounting degree and will prepare students to enter the public accounting profession in a tax-related capacity and provide a solid foundation for passing the rigorous CPA professional examination.

Master of Healthcare Administration 

The Master of Healthcare Administration provides early and mid-career professionals with foundational conceptual, technical, and human relations skills needed to assume increasingly responsible leadership roles in the healthcare industry. 

How to Read Course Descriptions

Accounting Courses

ACCT 5500 Managerial Tax Planning: 3 semester hours.

For prospective business managers, owners, or investors interested in important tax consequences of alternative financial transactions.

ACCT 5503 Accounting Information Systems: 3 semester hours.

A strategic approach to the use of accounting information in an organization. Tools for documentation of business processes and database design are introduced. Focuses on primary business cycles, interrelationship among them, and impact on accounting information. Includes assessment of risks involved in information processing and reporting. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: ACCT 3323.

ACCT 5531 Advanced Tax Concepts: 3 semester hours.

Specialized federal tax concepts and tax research principles for individuals, businesses, estates, and trusts. Elaborates on basic principles discussed in Principles of Taxation. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

ACCT 5533 Legal Environment of Accounting: 3 semester hours.

Study of legal issues facing accountants, including business law, forms of organizations, and regulatory requirements.

ACCT 5541 Management Control Systems: 3 semester hours.

Focuses on strategic and managerial evaluation and control systems using financial and nonfinancial accounting information. PREREQ: ACCT 3341

ACCT 5556 Auditing: 3 semester hours.

Concepts and practices of independent and internal auditing. Professional responsibilities, risk assessment, audit planning and reporting. PRE-or-COREQ: ACCT 4403 or ACCT 5503 or CIS 4403 or CIS 5503. PREREQ: ACCT 3324

ACCT 5557 Advanced Auditing: 3 semester hours.

Integration of financial statement auditing concepts in case discussions. Research into contemporary auditing literature.

ACCT 5560 Governmental and Not-for-Profit Accounting: 3 semester hours.

Accounting and reporting principles, standards and procedures applicable to governmental units and not-for-profit institutions, i.e. universities, hospitals. Special consideration to financial management problems peculiar to the not-for-profit sector. PREREQ: ACCT 3324.

ACCT 5561 Advanced Accounting: 3 semester hours.

Study of accounting problems arising in connection with partnerships, corporate affiliation; institutional, social, and fiduciary accounting; consignments; installment sales; and foreign exchange.

ACCT 5570 Contemporary Issues in Managerial Accounting: 3 semester hours.

Contemporary topics and emerging issues in managerial accounting. This field is rapidly evolving to meet the needs of enterprises competing in a dynamic global environment. PREREQ: ACCT 3341

ACCT 5571 Accounting Capstone 1: 1 semester hour.

Capstone course integrating accounting regulation topics. Emphasis on analytical, problem-solving and communication skills.

ACCT 5572 Accounting Capstone 2: 1 semester hour.

Capstone course integrating financial accounting and reporting topics. Emphasis on analytical, problem-solving and communication skills.

ACCT 5573 Accounting Capstone 3: 1 semester hour.

Capstone course integrating auditing and attestation topics. Emphasis on analytical, problem-solving and communication skills.

ACCT 5574 Accounting Capstone 4: 1 semester hour.

Capstone course integrating business environment and concept topics. Emphasis on analytical, problem-solving and communication skills.

ACCT 5580 Comparative International Accounting: 3 semester hours.

Study of systems that have proven to be problems in an international accounting context, particularly for corporate financial reporting. Also, the progress toward international harmonization of financial reporting and taxation.

ACCT 5590 Financial Reporting and Statement Analysis: 3 semester hours.

A financial accounting capstone course focusing on statement analysis from the point of view of the many users of financial statements: investors, creditors, managers, auditors, analysts, regulators, and employees through the case analysis of actual companies' financial statements. PREREQ: ACCT 4461 or ACCT 5561.

ACCT 5591 Seminar in Accounting: 3 semester hours.

Reading, discussion, and preparation of reports on selected topics. Restricted to senior and graduate students in business who have the consent of the instructor. Specialized evaluated graduate level activities and performances are identified in the course syllabus. May be repeated for up to 6 credits with permission of instructor.

ACCT 5592 Special Problems in Accounting: 1-3 semester hours.

Research and reports on selected problems or topics in accounting. Restricted to senior and graduate students in business who have the consent of the Dean. May be repeated under a different title for a maximum of 9 credits with the permission of the major advisor and the Dean.

ACCT 5593 Accounting Internship: 1-3 semester hours.

A program of significant business experience coordinated by the faculty to provide a broad exposure to issues. May be repeated up to a total of 3 credits.

ACCT 5599 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.

ACCT 6601 Tax Procedure: 3 semester hours.

Taxpayers' relationships with the Internal Revenue Service, including requests for rulings; conference and settlement procedures; deficiencies and their assessment; choice of forum; tax court practice; limitation periods and their mitigation, transferee liability; tax liens; and civil penalties.

ACCT 6611 Corporate Taxation I: 3 semester hours.

Tax considerations in corporate formations, distributions, redemptions, and liquidations. Some general consideration of the tax alternatives relating to the sales of corporate businesses.

ACCT 6612 Corporate Taxation II: 3 semester hours.

Corporate reorganizations; corporate acquisitions and divisions, including transfer or inheritance of losses and other tax attributes; corporate penalty taxes; consolidated returns provisions. PREREQ: ACCT 6611.

ACCT 6613 Fraud Examination: 3 semester hours.

This course will cover the major methods employees use to commit occupational fraud. Students will learn how and why occupational fraud is committed, how to assess where an organization is at the greatest risk for fraud, how fraudulent conduct can be deterred, and how allegations of fraud should be investigated and resolved.

ACCT 6621 Partnership Taxation: 3 semester hours.

Tax meaning of 'partnership' formation transactions between partner and partnership; determination and treatment of partnership income; sales or exchange of partnership interest; distributions; retirement; death of a partner; drafting the partnership agreement.

ACCT 6625 Managerial Control Systems and Corporate Social Responsibility: 3 semester hours.

The managerial and strategic use of control systems. Current practices in corporate social responsibility management and reporting practices. The interrelationship between management control systems and corporate social responsibility.

ACCT 6631 Accounting Theory: 3 semester hours.

Study of accounting conceptual framework and accounting principles. Case discussions and research into contemporary accounting literature.

ACCT 6632 Advanced Auditing: 3 semester hours.

Integration of auditing concepts in case discussions. Research into contemporary auditing literature and databases. PREREQ: ACCT 5556.

ACCT 6634 Seminar in Accounting: 3 semester hours.

Capstone course integrating special problems of financial, managerial, and tax accounting. Emphasis on analytical and communication skills. PREREQ: ACCT 5561.

ACCT 6635 Strategic Cost Management: 3 semester hours.

Critical examination of various cost management issues and techniques with emphasis on strategic, behavioral, and cultural issues. PREREQ: MBA 6611, MBA 6615 and MBA 6616.

ACCT 6641 Tax of Individuals and Property: 3 semester hours.

Taxation of Individuals and Property Transactions: Tax problems of individual taxpayers; problems incident to the sale, exchange, and other disposition of property, including recognition and characterization concepts.

ACCT 6645 Tax Research Planning and Policy: 3 semester hours.

Instruction in tax research techniques leading to a research project on a federal tax subject; examination of the principal criteria used to make choices on forms of taxation and the impact of tax provisions on type and location of business and investment activities.

ACCT 6646 State, Local, and International Taxation: 3 semester hours.

Nature and purpose of state taxation; comparison of property and excise taxes; uniformity of taxation; assessment and collection procedures; remedies available to taxpayers. Survey of international tax regimes and consequences of various cross-border business transactions.

ACCT 6647 Tax Exempt Organizations: 3 semester hours.

A study of the exemption from federal income tax accorded to a variety of public and private organizations and the tax treatment of contributions to such organizations; public policies underlying exemption from tax and deductibility of contributions.

ACCT 6648 Gift and Estate Tax Planning: 3 semester hours.

Taxation of trust and estate income, including simple and complex trusts, annuities, property distributions, income in respect of a decedents, grantor trusts. Planning lifetime and testamentary dispositions of property; postmorten planning; analysis of small and large estates; eliminating and offsetting complicating and adverse factors; selection of a fiduciary and administrative provisions.

ACCT 6660 Accounting for Governmental and Not-for-Profit Entities: 3 semester hours.

In-depth study of accounting and reporting principles, standards and procedures applicable to government and nonprofit entities with an emphasis on topics unique to these institutions.

ACCT 6699 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.

Economics Courses

ECON 5504 Game Theory: 3 semester hours.

Use game theory to model conflicts, cooperation and strategy, with applications in economics, business, political science, psychology, sociology, anthropology and biology. Equilibrium concepts, information structures, static and multi-period games will be discussed. PREREQ: ECON 2201 and ECON 2202 or ECON 6610/MBA 6610 or permission of instructor.

ECON 5509 Industrial Organization: 3 semester hours.

Industrial organization extends the theory of the firm to examine firms' strategic behavior, including methods to differentiate products and aggressive prizing schemes, and the government's response to these activities. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: ECON 2201 and ECON 2202 or MBA 6610.

ECON 5511 Political Economy: 3 semester hours.

A critical introduction to the relationship between economic institutions and social analysis. The social implications of different views on economic concepts, such as the division of labor, capital, and value, are investigated from a classical, neoclassical and an institutional perspective.

ECON 5531 Money and Banking: 3 semester hours.

The study of financial instruments, money, interest rates, the banking industry, and the structure and monetary policies of the Federal Reserve Bank. An examination of past and present monetary policy. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: ECON 2201 and ECON 2202 or MBA 6610.

ECON 5533 Economic Development: 3 semester hours.

Theories and principles of economic development, characteristics, and problems of underdeveloped and developing countries, alternative techniques and policies for the promotion of growth and development.

ECON 5534 International Trade: 3 semester hours.

Study government trade policies, trade laws, and national and international trade institutions. Study trade strategy from the perspective of governments and business. Understand the different levels of economic integration among countries and the political economy of trade policies and trade conflicts/cooperations. Specific evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: ECON 2201 and ECON 2202 or ECON 6610/MBA 6610 or permission of instructor.

ECON 5535 International Finance: 3 semester hours.

Study foreign exchange market and theories of exchange rate determination. Discuss the effectiveness of fiscal and monetary policies in an open economy and the implications of international macroeconomic policy coordination/conflict for government officials and business. Learn about foreign exchange hedging and risk management for country and business. Study lessons from recent international financial crises. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: ECON 2201 and ECON 2202 or ECON 6610/MBA 6610 or permission of instructor.

ECON 5538 Public Finance: 3 semester hours.

Study of government revenues, expenditures, and debt management, including an analysis of the effects of these governmental activities on the American economy. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: ECON 2201 and ECON 2202 or MBA 6610.

ECON 5539 State and Local Finance: 3 semester hours.

Study of taxation, borrowing and spending by state, city, county and other local governments. Taxing and spending patterns are evaluated and compared by states.

ECON 5572 Comparative Economic Systems: 3 semester hours.

Study and comparison of the theories and practices found in various economic systems. Includes a study of both the free market and socialistic planning.

ECON 5574 Senior Seminar: 3 semester hours.

Discussion-driven capstone class that integrates selected topics in economics. Students will be required to do economic research, and write on and discuss current economic issues. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.

ECON 5581 Independent Study: 1-3 semester hours.

Individuals will be assigned independent problems for research under the supervision of a departmental faculty member. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

ECON 5585 Econometrics: 3 semester hours.

The application of statistical and mathematical methods to the analysis of economic data, with a purpose of giving empirical content to economic theories and verifying them or refuting them.

ECON 5591 Economic Seminar: 1-3 semester hours.

Seminar. May be repeated.

ECON 5592 Economic Seminar: 1-3 semester hours.

Seminar. May be repeated.

ECON 5599 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.

ECON 6610 Applied Economics: 3 semester hours.

Applied principles and techniques of analysis in micro and macro economics. Equivalent to MBA 6610.

ECON 6620 Seminar Philosophy of Social Science: 3 semester hours.

The application of mathematical and scientific methods to the study of social, economic, and political life will be considered through the reading of certain seminal writings. Attention will be given to the fundamental assumptions about the nature of scientific rationality. Required of D.A. students.

ECON 6621 Seminar Interdisciplinary Topics in Social Sciences: 3 semester hours.

Examination of selected topics in the social sciences from the analytic orientations and perspectives common and peculiar to the disciplines of political science, economics and sociology. Required of D.A. students.

ECON 6650 Thesis: 1-6 semester hours.

The student will do research of an economic nature supervised by a faculty member in the Economics Department. The research project will be of an interdisciplinary nature and the student will be supervised by faculty members from the department(s) involved as well as from the Economics Department. 1-6 credits. May be repeated. Graded S/U.

ECON 6699 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.

Finance Courses

FIN 5505 Advanced Corporate Financial Management: 3 semester hours.

Evaluation and analysis for financial decision making. Asset valuation, cost of capital, leasing, dividend policy, mergers and acquisitions, IPOs, asset restructuring and additional topics related to firms' financial decisions and performance. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: FIN 3315 or MBA 6615.

FIN 5531 Financial Modeling: 3 semester hours.

Survey of integrative modeling with special applications of computer models. Includes topics from cash flow forecasting, mergers and acquisition, financial structure, and capital budgeting.

FIN 5545 Real Estate Finance: 3 semester hours.

Principles and methods of valuing business and residential land and improvements; analysis of sources and methods used in the financing of construction and development.

FIN 5548 Financial Management of Depository Institutions: 3 semester hours.

An analysis of the managerial issues which affect the financial performance of depository institutions such as capital adequacy, liquidity and asset/liability management techniques, profitability analysis, funding and investment decisions.

FIN 5551 Student-Managed Investment Fund I: 3 semester hours.

Management of the D.A. Davidson Student-Managed Investment Fund. Students act as financial analysts. Provides students with real-world knowledge and judgment crucial to sound investing. Students may apply either FIN 5551 or FIN 5552, but not both, toward their electives.

FIN 5552 Student-Managed Investment Fund II: 3 semester hours.

Management of the D.A. Davidson Student-Managed Investment Fund. Students act as financial analysts. Emphasis on security selection, portfolio management, and creation of an annual report. Student can apply either FIN 5551 or FIN 5552, but not both, toward their electives.

FIN 5564 Entrepreneurial Finance: 3 semester hours.

Course develops financial and managerial skills important to students who are interested in pursuing careers in an entrepreneurial setting. Topics include: financial issues unique to entrepreneurial firms, development of skills with wide application in entrepreneurial situations, and financing sources available to entrepreneurial companies.

FIN 5575 International Corporate Finance: 3 semester hours.

Study of financing investment projects abroad including the tapping of overseas capitol markets, financing export transactions, hedging foreign exchange risks, and the control alternatives of international business.

FIN 5578 Investments: 3 semester hours.

Fundamental principles in the risk-return valuation of financial instruments. Topics include the institutional framework in which securities are traded, modern portfolio theory, asset pricing, derivatives, and portfolio management.

FIN 5580 Financial Analysis and Performance: 3 semester hours.

Modeling, measuring and interpreting financial and strategic management of firms for decision making from a short- and long-term perspective. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: FIN 3315 or MBA 6615.

FIN 5584 Options and Futures: 3 semester hours.

Examination of the pricing and use of options, financial futures, swaps, and other derivative securities.

FIN 5591 Seminar in Finance: 3 semester hours.

Reading, discussion and preparation of reports on selected topics. Restricted to senior and graduate students in business who have the consent of the instructor. May be repeated with instructor's permission for up to 6 credits.

FIN 5592 Special Problems in Finance: 2-3 semester hours.

Research and reports on selected problems or topics in finance. Restricted to senior and graduate students in business who have the consent of the Dean. May be repeated under different title for a maximum of 9 credits with the permission of the major advisor and the Dean.

FIN 5599 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.

FIN 6699 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.

Health Care Admin Courses

HCA 5510 Management of Healthcare Provider Organizations: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the body of knowledge and modern-day challenges related to the management of acute care and specialty hospitals, ambulatory and long term care facilities, medical group practices, and integrated healthcare delivery systems. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

HCA 5515 Physician Practice Management: 3 semester hours.

The course will provide an overview of physician practice management concepts with an emphasis on business management concepts including revenue cycle management, supply chain management, business law, human resource management and marketing. Students will identify and develop solutions to management cases peculiar to the practice management arena.

HCA 5520 The Business of Healthcare: 3 semester hours.

This course provides an introduction and orientation to the business side of healthcare organizations for non-business health professions students. Topics covered include: the fundamentals of healthcare leadership; healthcare budgeting and finance; healthcare planning and marketing; healthcare regulations, laws, and ethics; healthcare informatics, Human Resource management of healthcare organizations, healthcare quality and performance improvments; and current healthcare megatrends, including the business-related impacts of healthcare reform. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

HCA 5540 Healthcare Economics and Policy: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the economic theory, methods, and tools needed to analyze the healthcare industry, including the acute care, physician services, pharmaceutical, and healthcare insurance markets. Explores historical and current issues and trends in U.S. healthcare policy. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

HCA 5553 Healthcare Finance: 3 semester hours.

The application of financial management principles, practices, and techniques used in healthcare organizations. An understanding and analysis of how these financial tools are used in decision making and how they are integrated into the healthcare organization's planning process. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: ACCT 2202 and FIN 3315 or equivalent.

HCA 5560 Healthcare Quality and Performance Improvement: 3 semester hours.

An in depth study of the issues, trends, tools and techniques related to patient safety, healthcare quality, and performance improvement. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

HCA 5575 Health Law and Bioethics: 3 semester hours.

This course develops a roadmap to facilitate risk management in the provision of healthcare services. Issues addressed include regulation and licensure, liability, selected aspects of public programs, and ethical issues regarding death, reproduction, and research. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

HCA 5580 Long Term Care Management: 3 semester hours.

A study of long-term care management across the continuum of care. The course defines the various segments of the long-term care system, describes how the system developed, compares it to an ideal system, and projects future trends. Incorporates applicable aspects of current laws and legislation and changes in care deliver. The course includes the unique requirements of leadership and culture in a long-term care setting. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

HCA 5599 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

This course is not described in the catalog. The course title and number of credits are announced in the class schedule by the scheduling department. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times. May be repeated.

HCA 6615 Health Services Management: 3 semester hours.

Determination and fulfillment of mission, plans, and structure, motivating individuals, and managing activities to support people in their work and in the achievement of their goals.

HCA 6628 Applied Healthcare Solutions: 3 semester hours.

Student teams participate in applied healthcare projects. Focus is on enhancing broad-based skills developed in other HCA or MBA courses. Equivalent to MBA 6628, PREREQ: HCA 5573

HCA 6636 Rural Healthcare Management: 3 semester hours.

A study of the issues and trends in rural health, including an overview of the leadership and managment of critical access hospitals and other rural healthcare organizations.

HCA 6640 Advanced Healthcare Economics and Policy: 3 semester hours.

This course builds on concepts taught in Healthcare Economics and Policy. Our focus will be the intersection between, public health, health economics and health policy. The class will be a combination of lecture and discussion-based material. Class discussions will largely center around both seminal and contemporary readings from prominent health economics and health policy journals.

HCA 6650 Healthcare Leadership and Governance: 3 semester hours.

Study of issues and challenges related to the effective leadership and governance of healthcare organizations, including responsibilities and delegated authorities of the governing board, executive management, and the medical staff.

HCA 6651 Masters Project: 1-3 semester hours.

Under the guidance of a supervising committee, each student will conduct an in-depth project specific to a current issue or problem in healthcare management. Written documentation and an oral defense of the project are required. Must be taken for three credits the first time this course is taken. May be repeated for variable credit thereafter. 1 to 3 credits. Graded S/U.

HCA 6665 Health Insurance and Reimbursement: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to, and analysis of, health insurance in the United States. Select topics include reimbursement systems, public and private health insurance; their impact on patients, organizations, society, care delivery modes, and clinical and managerial quality.

HCA 6682 US Health Systems and Policy: 3 semester hours.

An examination of US health industry, systems, and organizations from the four-point perspective of access, quality, finance, and policy.

HCA 6685 Integrative Seminar: 3 semester hours.

MHA capstone course provides an overview and integration of the MHA competencies (Communication and relationship management, Leadership, Professionalism, Knowledge of the healthcare environment, and Business knowledge and skills) through selected readings, case study discussions and presentations, and guest speakers.

HCA 6691 Independent Problems in Health Care Administration: 1-3 semester hours.

Individual work under faculty guidance. May be repeated for up to 6 credits.

HCA 6695 Healthcare Residency: 3-9 semester hours.

Advanced practical experience in clinical healthcare practice. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.

HCA 6699 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

This course is not described in the catalog. The course title and number of credits are announced in the class schedule by the scheduling department. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times. May be repeated.

Informatics Courses

INFO 5307 Intermediate Systems Analysis and Design: 3 semester hours.

Provides a general understanding of the systems development life cycle and develops the analytical skills required to thoroughly understand a problem and formulate the optimal solution. Projects will require the student to use process modeling techniques to assist in the analysis and design process. Requirements gathering is emphasized. The analysis and design of web-based systems is included.

INFO 5417 Statistical Methods for Data Analytics: 3 semester hours.

Encompasses data visualization, descriptive data analysis, ANOVA approaches, correlation and multiple regression and additional modeling topics. Emphasis will be based upon appropriate interpretation of statistical results. All data will include a business or health care context to acquaint students with current statistical practice.

INFO 5507 Database Design and Implementation: 3 semester hours.

Covers multi-user relational database management systems, stored procedures, SQL, transaction processing, etc. The course emphasizes Secure Software Design, which includes secure design elements, software architecture, secure design review, and threat modeling. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PRE-or-COREQ: INFO 5307.

INFO 5511 Intermediate Information Assurance: 3 semester hours.

Focuses on homeland security, information assurance, integrity, control, and privacy. Covers CNSS-4011, national policy, and international treaties. The course considers Access Control, Application Security, Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Planning, Cryptography, Information Security and Risk Management, Legal, Regulations, Compliance and Investigations, Operations Security, Physical (Environmental) Security, Security Architecture. Includes security issues around steady state operations and management of software, as well as security measures taken when a product reaches its end of life. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: INFO 2285 or CS 2275 or INFO 3310, or permission of instructor.

INFO 5512 Systems Security for Senior Management: 1-3 semester hours.

Review of system architecture, system security measures, system operations policy, system security management plan, and provisions for system operator and end user training. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. COREQ: INFO 5519. PREREQ: INFO 5511, INFO 5513, INFO 5514, INFO 5515, and INFO 5516 or permission of instructor.

INFO 5513 Systems Security Administration: 1-3 semester hours.

Outlines the basic principles of systems security administration. The student will be introduced to the methods and technologies associated with running a system to maintain privacy and security. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. COREQ: INFO 5519. PREREQ: INFO 5511 or permission of instructor.

INFO 5514 Systems Security Management: 1-3 semester hours.

Establishes a framework for managing both systems and systems administrators operating in a secure and private computing environment. The course deals with facilities management, contingency plans, laws, standards of conduct and operations management. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. COREQ: INFO 5519. PREREQ: INFO 5511 and INFO 5513 or permission of instructor.

INFO 5515 System Certification: 1-3 semester hours.

Describes techniques and methods for certifying a system is in compliance with national and governmental information assurance standards. Evaluates various certification methodologies. Specific, evaluted graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. COREQ: INFO 5519. PREREQ: INFO 5511, INFO 5513, and INFO 5514 or permission of instructor.

INFO 5516 Risk Analysis: 1-3 semester hours.

Develops techniques to characterize and provide perspective on the likelihood of adverse events. Explains methods to characterize the consequences and general costs associated with the various adverse events occurring. The analysis provides insights into various likelihood and consequence combinations. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. COREQ: INFO 5519. PREREQ: INFO 5511, INFO 5513, INFO 5514, and INFO 5515 or permission of instructor.

INFO 5517 Information Assurance Engineer: 1-3 semester hours.

Focuses on the practical application of systems design and engineering principles and processes to develop secure systems. Topics include analysis of organizational needs, definition of security requirements, designing systems architectures, developing secure designs, implementing system security, and support of systems security assessment/authorization for organizations. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: INFO 5511, INFO 5513, INFO 5514, INFO 5515, and INFO 5516.

INFO 5519 Advanced Informatics Practicum: 1-3 semester hours.

Significant informatics experience including research coordinated by the faculty designed to provide broad exposure to issues in Information Assurance. Does not fulfill major/minor requirements. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. Graded S/U. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performacnes are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.

INFO 5530 Web Application Development: 3 semester hours.

Focuses on the development of dynamic, online applications using a programming language like PHP or ASP.Net and a relational database. The course will consider Secure Software Implementation/Coding, which involves secure coding practices, avoiding vulnerabilities, and reviewing code to ensure that there are no errors in the code or security controls. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: INFO 3307

INFO 5532 Mobile Application Development: 3 semester hours.

This course will introduce mobile app programming and provide theoretical and practical knowledge to design and build mobile applications. Students will learn various techniques in mobile app development using a programming language like Java. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: INFO 1182.

INFO 5571 Computer Forensics Essentials: 1-3 semester hours.

Introduction to issues of both in data privacy and computer forensics - using available tools, learners can reveal the stored passwords on their computer and access previously deleted data. Explains the role of computer forensics in both the business and private world, identifies the current techniques and tools for forensic examinations; describes and identifies basic principles of good professional practice for a forensic computing practitioner; develops familiarity with forensic tools and application in different situations. Risk exposure for electronic commerce businesses; offenders and abuses; criminal opportunities; evidential aspects, case studies, E-discovery, forensic readiness corporate planning and response, from evidence collection to business continuity; testing vulnerabilities; reverse engineering. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: INFO 5507 and INFO 3380 or permission of instructor.

INFO 5572 Cloud Security Essentials: 1-3 semester hours.

Cloud computing provides for distributed computing and data storage capabilities. Instead of buying large servers to store data and being saddled with the cost of building and maintaining those systems, users can now purchase those servers from a third party with the ability to expand or contract those needs as necessary. This course will look at current research results in cloud security in order to identify opportunities for continued research in this field. PREREQ: INFO 5507 and INFO 3380 or permission of instructor.

INFO 5573 Continuous Monitor, Intrusion Analysis, Response: 1-3 semester hours.

Using principles continuous monitoring and baselines, develop knowledge and understanding of the strategies, techniques, and technologies used in attacking and defending networks and how to design secure networks and protect against intrusion, malware and other hacker exploits. Introduces methods of attacking and defending a network; design of secure information infrastructure; servers, networks, firewalls, workstations, and intrusion detection systems. Intrusion detection and network monitoring techniques; worms, viruses and other malware; operation, detection and response; principles of penetration testing for assessment of system security; hacker exploits, tools and countermeasures. Investigative techniques, ethical, legal and privacy issues. PREREQ: INFO 5507, INFO 5511, and INFO 3380 or permission of instructor.

INFO 5574 SCADA Management and Lab: 1-3 semester hours.

Supervisory control and data acquisition systems are used to control many utility networks, chemical plants, pipelines and many other types of industries. This couse will examine the vulnerabilities associated with these systems and discuss how they can be made secure from outside attack. Fundamentals of software-controlled processes will also be discussed. PREREQ: INFO 5511, INFO 5507, and INFO 3380 or permission of instructor.

INFO 5582 Systems Development and Implementation Methods: 3 semester hours.

This course presents the process of software development and the methodologies to lower development costs, increase software reliability, decrease development time and ensure application development success. An overview and comparison of traditional and modern methods of software development are presented. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: INFO 5507.

INFO 5584 Secure Software Life Cycle Development: 3 semester hours.

In today's interconnected world, security must be included within each phase of the software lifecycle. This course contains the largest, most comprehensive collection of best practices, policies, and procedures to ensure a security initiative across all phases of application development, regardless of methodology. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

INFO 5585 Data Visualization.: 3 semester hours.

This course will focus on visualizing data using a variety of tools. The course will help each student develop competency in critical thinking, analysis, and writing results. The course will focus on using Tableau to develop appropriate displays of data. This will involve learning new software and telling a story with your data. The course will also focus on location analytics using ArcGIS Online, Business Analyst Online, and Community Analyst Online. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

INFO 5586 Data Analytics: 3 semester hours.

Provides an overview of the fundamentals of analysis to support decision makers in achieving organizational results. Students become familiar with the tools needed to frame problems, analytical techniques to generate and test hypotheses, and the skills to interpret the results into meaningful information. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: MGT 2217.

INFO 5587 Software Systems Study: 3 semester hours.

In addition to system optimization techniques, management strategies will be discussed. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: INFO 3307.

INFO 5591 Seminar in Informatics: 3 semester hours.

Reading, discussion, and reporting on selected topics. May be repeated for up to 6 credits with permission of instructor. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: Graduate status in Business and permission of instructor.

INFO 5592 Special Problems in Informatics: 1-3 semester hours.

Research and reports on problems or topics in informatics. May be repeated for up to 9 credits with different content. PREREQ: Graduate status in Business and permission of the Chair.

INFO 5593 Informatics Internship: 1-3 semester hours.

Significant business experience coordinated by the faculty to provide broad exposure to informatics issues. Letter grade assigned. May be repeated for a total of 3 credits.

INFO 5599 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.

INFO 6610 Advanced Information Assurance: 3 semester hours.

Network and IS security issues, risk assessment, technological, and procedural security measures; computer fraud and privacy issues; hacker attacks, phone fraud, denial of service, and virus and worm attacks; laboratory and professional practice.

INFO 6620 Advanced Systems Analysis and Design: 3 semester hours.

This course builds on basic system analysis and design concepts including distributed systems analysis and design. Use cases, quality assurance, and performance metrics are investigated. The course will also introduce students to some of the most significant trends, issues, and research results in system analysis, architecture, and design.

INFO 6630 Advanced Data Management: 3 semester hours.

This course builds on basic database design and implementation concepts. New developments in database technology are discussed. Students examine the impact of emerging database standards and evaluate the contribution of new approaches to practical implementations of data management. PREREQ: INFO 5507.

INFO 6640 Advanced Data Analytics: 3 semester hours.

This course covers advanced analytical techniques and methods designed to resolve key management issues. Students will learn to resolve issues involving risk and sensitivity and learn to identify patterns of performance, working toward a goal of recognizing insights into the data that will support good decision making. Students may work with a large dataset to convert it to meaningful information by using the analytical tools learned in class.

INFO 6650 Thesis: 1-6 semester hours.

1-6 credits. Graded S/U. May be repeated.

INFO 6660 Informatics Project: 1-3 semester hours.

A significant project involving informatics toward the completion of the M.S. program with non-thesis option. Includes a report and oral examination. Graded S/U. May be repeated.

INFO 6670 Management of Informatics Projects: 3 semester hours.

This course provides an informatics orientation for project management. Students learn techniques for planning, organizing, scheduling, and controlling informatics projects, including software cost estimation and software risk management. Establishing project communications, change management, quality assurance, and managing distributed software teams and projects are among the topics discussed.

INFO 6699 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.

Management Courses

MGT 5510 Entrepreneurship Opportunity Feasibility and Planning: 3 semester hours.

Conduct a detailed feasibility analysis of a business idea and complete a business plan using sound business principles. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

MGT 5512 Entrepreneurial Solutions: 3 semester hours.

Advanced students create entrepreneurial market offering ideas and put such ideas through a commercialization process to test their viability. Entrepreneurial Market offering ideas address complex business problems under the supervision of a senior consultant. Class discussions supplement field work. PREREQ: MKTG 2225: Basic Marketing Management OR MBA 6613: Marketing OR Permission of Instructor

MGT 5520 Native American Organizational Systems: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of factors and dimensions to be considered in the structure and design of contemporary Native American organizations. Comparison of contemporary Native organizational systems with traditional Native organizational approaches and contemporary non-Native organizations. Specific graduate level activities and/or performances will be identified in the course syllabus.

MGT 5522 Native American Enterprise: 3 semester hours.

Approaches, strategies, and models utilized in developing tribally-owned and privately-owned Native American businesses across the U.S. and Canada. Analysis of social, economic, and environmental contingency factors that contribute to successful establishment of Native American businesses. Specific graduate level activities and/or performances will be identified in the course syllabus.

MGT 5530 Advanced Operations and Production Management: 3 semester hours.

Study of problems on line management in organizations. Major sections include strategy, process analysis, personpower planning, inventories, scheduling, and control of operations. Emphasizes both behavioral and technical aspects of problem solving in the area of operations management.

MGT 5534 Productivity and Quality: 3 semester hours.

Study of the factors involved in an organization's productivity and quality of product or service.

MGT 5541 Leading in Organizations: 3 semester hours.

Skills-oriented approach to the understanding and application of behavioral theories and concepts to organizational problems. Emphasis on leadership skill awareness and development through applying conceptual knowledge to case studies and skill practice scenarios. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: MGT 3312 or MBA 6612.

MGT 5550 Manufacturing Strategy: 3 semester hours.

Study of the various production alternatives as critical factors in a company's competitive strategies.

MGT 5561 Business Law: 3 semester hours.

MGT 5562 Issues in Business and Society: 3 semester hours.

Seminar course designed to focus thinking on critical issues facing managers in making decision choices regarding employees and other stakeholder groups, the community, and the environment.

MGT 5563 Business Law Concepts: 1 semester hour.

Legal and regulatory environment of business. Topics include: tort law, product liability, contracts, sales of goods, employment law, securities regulation, and bankruptcy.

MGT 5565 International Business: 3 semester hours.

Special emphasis on managerial functions and critical elements of the management process in a firm operating under foreign economic, technological, political, social and cultural environments.

MGT 5573 Human Resource Management: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the methodology of employee selection, employment and development; personnel supervision and management; financial compensation; job analysis; behavioral tools and techniques employed to deal with personnel problems and contemporary problems of personpower management.

MGT 5574 Advanced Human Resource Management: 3 semester hours.

In-depth study of selected personnel/human resources management topics, including employee selection, performance evaluation, and compensation administration. PREREQ: MGT 4473 or MGT 5573, and MGT 2217.

MGT 5580 Labor and Employment Law: 3 semester hours.

Study of state and federal laws, domestic and foreign, governing employment relationships, including labor-management relations, discrimination and employee rights, work-place safety, compensation and benefits, and related topics.

MGT 5582 Project Management: 3 semester hours.

Philosophy and tools of project management focusing on applied methodologies. Addresses project scope, breakdown structure, schedules, and closure following professionally accepted industry standards.

MGT 5583 Industrial Relations: 3 semester hours.

Integrated study of principles and practices of collective bargaining and industrial relations. Discussion of methods and techniques in dealing with labor-management problems arising out of contract negotiations and administrations.

MGT 5584 International Collegiate Business Strategy Competition: 3 semester hours.

Students apply to compete in an international strategy team competition. Early rounds of the competition take place on campus. The final rounds typically take place over an intensive weekend in Anaheim, CA. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.

MGT 5591 Seminar in Management and Organization: 3 semester hours.

Reading, discussion, and preparation of reports on selected topics. Restricted to senior and graduate students in business who have the consent of the instructor. May be repeated with instructor's permission for up to 6 credits. May be graded S/U.

MGT 5592 Special Problems in Management and Organization: 2-3 semester hours.

Research and reports on selected problems or topics in management and organization. Restricted to senior and graduate students in business who have the consent of the Dean. May be repeated under a different title for a maximum of 9 credits with the permission of the major advisor and the Dean.

MGT 5599 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.

MGT 6675 Environmental Management: 3 semester hours.

The study of environmental issues in managerial decision-making. Total cost/benefit analysis, political ramifications, publicity, ethical considerations, global issues. Analysis of various business functions and their impact on short- and long-term concerns.

MGT 6699 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.

Marketing Courses

MKTG 5505 Personal Selling and Sales Force Management: 3 semester hours.

Attention given to product features, buying motives, selling points, principles and practices of selling, psychology of salesmanship, sales problems, personal requirements, opportunities. Determination of the amount and allocation of personal sales effort to be applied to the market and methods of organizing, evaluating, and controlling this effort. PREREQ: MKTG 2225 or MBA 6613.

MKTG 5510 Entrepreneurship Opportunity Feasibility and Planning: 3 semester hours.

Conduct a detailed feasibility analysis of a business idea and complete a business plan using sound business principles. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

MKTG 5512 Entrepreneurial Solutions: 3 semester hours.

Advanced students create entrepreneurial market offering ideas and put such ideas through a commercialization process to test their viability. Entrepreneurial Market offering ideas address complex business problems under the supervision of a senior consultant. Class discussions supplement field work. PREREQ: MKTG 2225: Basic Marketing Management OR MBA 6613: Marketing OR Permission of Instructor

MKTG 5521 Services Marketing: 3 semester hours.

Examines the development, promotion, and management of services. Topics covered include strategic planning, delivery channels and promotional challenges inherent to services.

MKTG 5526 Marketing Research: 3 semester hours.

Evaluation and study of providing relevant marketing information to management. Emphasizes problem formulation, consideration of data sources, means of acquiring information, sampling, interpretation of results.

MKTG 5527 Consumer Behavior: 3 semester hours.

In-depth analysis of the internal and external influences of consumer behavior and decision-making, including learning, perception, cultural values, group influences, and a range of psychological and sociological concepts. This advanced study of consumer behavior will include analysis of a consumer dataset, as well as case studies highlighting concepts under investigation, and a consumer behavior audit. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: MKTG 2225 or MBA 6613.

MKTG 5528 Integrated Brand Promotion: 3 semester hours.

Planning and execution of advertising, sales promotion, and public relations programs developed into an integrated brand promotion program. Includes development of Integrated Brand Promotion plan. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: MKTG 2225 or MBA 6613.

MKTG 5532 New Product Management: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of new product ideas: screening, business analysis, prototype development, market testing, and commercialization of goods and services. Includes diffusion of innovation issues in consumer and industrial markets.

MKTG 5554 The Future of Markets: 3 semester hours.

The Future of Markets examines changes in the marketplace and issues confronting a marketing professional in the twenty-first century. Integrates insights from digital marketing, global marketing, and consumer behavior. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

MKTG 5565 Global Marketing: 3 semester hours.

Global market structures are analyzed. Covers issues relate to the structure and effects of global markets. Offers insight for global marketing managers and engaged citizens on economic, cultural, and political aspects of global market dynamics. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: MKTD 2225. D.

MKTG 5570 Advanced Sales: 3 semester hours.

This course teaches students advanced sales strategies and tactics from world-class sales professionals with an emphasis on business-to-business (B2B) selling. Practical skills include the art of persuasion, communication with impact, interpersonal relationships and self-awareness through the science of emotional intelligence. Students study a variety of selling methodologies and practice real-world application through role play and scenario-based exercises. Designed for students who: 1) desire a sales-based career or 2) need to understand sales in pursuit of a career path as a senior executive/entrepreneur. 3) For those who need to understand sales in pursuit of a sales support role. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. Prerequisite: MKTG 2225 or MG 6613 OR Permission of Instructor

MKTG 5575 Competitive Intelligence: 3 semester hours.

How to use competitive intelligence to gain strategic advantage. Includes understanding of information gathering techniques, the conversion of information into intelligence, various analysis methodologies, and intelligence dissemination processes.

MKTG 5580 Digital Marketing: 3 semester hours.

Familiarizes students with strategy and tactics for digital marketing, including platforms, social media, and other web 2.0 tools. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: MKTG 2225.

MKTG 5591 Seminar in Marketing: 3 semester hours.

Reading discussion, and preparation of reports on selected topics. Restricted to senior and graduate students in business who have the consent of the instructor. May be repeated with instructor's permission for up to 6 credits.

MKTG 5592 Special Problems in Marketing: 2-3 semester hours.

Research and reports on selected problems or topics in marketing. Restricted to senior and graduate students in business who have the consent of the Dean. May be repeated under a different title for a maximum of 9 credits with the permission of the major advisor and the Dean.

MKTG 5599 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.

MKTG 6699 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.

Master of Bus Admin Courses

MBA 5599 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.

MBA 6610 Applied Economics: 3 semester hours.

Applied principles and techniques of analysis in micro and macro economics. Equivalent to ECON 6610.

MBA 6611 Financial Reporting and Managerial Accounting: 3 semester hours.

Integrates study of accounting concepts with understanding of financial reports. Use of accounting information in managerial decision making and control.

MBA 6612 Human Behavior in Organizations: 3 semester hours.

Study of human behavior in organizations. Decision-making and problem-solving, interpersonal relations and communications, and negotiations.

MBA 6613 Marketing: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of forces producing changes in general business conditions. Principles of market-driven decision-making. Application to marketing management decisions and marketing strategy.

MBA 6614 Operations Management: 3 semester hours.

Decision-making techniques for analysis of operational systems. Topics include operations/production planning, process analysis, project planning and control, and quality control. Include GC, MBA.

MBA 6615 Finance: 3 semester hours.

Study of the allocation of scarce resources, domestic and international financial management.

MBA 6616 Business Policy: 3 semester hours.

Study of strategic decision-making in a firm and its relation to the functional area of a business. Techniques of industry analysis. Study of ethics/social responsibility in the business organization.

MBA 6619 Statistical Tools for the MBA: 1 semester hour.

This course provides a review of basic statistics for MBA students. Because it is a tools' course that is applicable to other courses in the MBA program, it should be taken early in the student's program. The course covers summary statistics, descriptive measures, basic probability theory, normal distributions, confidence intervals, and simple and multiple linear regressions. Microsoft Excel will be used to analyze data.

MBA 6620 Quantitative Information for Business Decisions: 3 semester hours.

Development and use of financial and non-financial information to support business analysis and decision-making. Develops and applies analytical tools and framework through readings and case analysis.

MBA 6621 Managerial Decision Making and Negotiation: 3 semester hours.

Students will engage with the concepts and skills required by systematic approaches to decision making and negotiation. Topics include full-cycle decision making and implementation, collective deal-making, and dispute resolution in dyads and with multiple parties.

MBA 6622 Financial Management: 3 semester hours.

Integrated analysis of a firm's decisions with emphasis on the financial aspects of these decisions. Topics include advanced capital budgeting, working capital management, modern portfolio theory, the cost of capital, and international corporate finance.

MBA 6623 Marketing in a Consumer Culture: 3 semester hours.

This course integrates insights from marketing strategy, consumer behavior, and branding to provide students with theoretical knowledge and practical experience for the 21st century marketplace.

MBA 6624 Information Systems for Business: 3 semester hours.

Course aims to present students with an understanding of a variety of information systems and technologies that support enterprise strategies and objectives, facilitate business operations and decision making, and allow organizations to achieve a sustainable competitive advantage in the market. Topics include fundamental concepts of hardware, software, computer networks, and data management; enterprise information systems and their applications in different industries; electronic commerce adoption, implementation, and management; and information systems development processes and methodologies. Behavioral, social, and ethical implications of information technology adoption and use in different domains will also be discussed.

MBA 6625 Managerial Control Systems: 3 semester hours.

The managerial and strategic use of control systems. The impact of control systems on organizational behavior and decision making.

MBA 6626 Business Policy and Strategy: 3 semester hours.

Strategic management of the firm, with emphasis on strategic direction, governance, external and internal analysis, strategy formulation, and implementation. Includes coverage of strategy and ethics and strategy in a global environment.

MBA 6628 Applied Business Solutions: 3 semester hours.

Student teams participate in applied business projects or manage a simulated company's operations. Focus is on enhancing broad-based skills developed in other MBA courses. This course must be taken in the last semester in which a student is enrolled. PREREQ: MBA 6623. PRE-or-COREQ: MBA 6626.

MBA 6629 Productivity Management: 3 semester hours.

This course is directed at improving a firm's efforts to increase performance and competitiveness through developing and managing the elements of the value chain.

MBA 6637 Introduction to Business Analytics: 3 semester hours.

Survey course that includes topics from major areas of business use of data analytics: modeling, predictive analytics, and data mining. The course will also include discussion of data warehousing and data cleaning. Using software, students will be expected to do case work with data providing an executive summary with supporting statistical analyses for business decision making.

MBA 6639 MBA Paper: 3 semester hours.

May be repeated.

MBA 6641 Relational Leadership: 3 semester hours.

Students build knowledge and skills in leading others through a relational lens. Topics include self-management, leading teams; managing conflict constructively, facilitating change, and coaching and motivating others.

MBA 6650 Thesis: 1-6 semester hours.

May be repeated. Graded S/U.

MBA 6692 Special Problems in Business Administration: 2-3 semester hours.

Research readings or reports on selected problems and topics. May be repeated under a different title for a maximum of 6 hours credit. Requires the consent of the instructor.

MBA 6693 Graduate Internship: 1-3 semester hours.

A program of significant business experience coordinated by the faculty to provide broad exposure to issues. May be repeated for up to 3 credits. Graded S/U.

MBA 6699 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.