Sociology (SOC)

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Courses

SOC 5503 Contemporary Sociological Theory: 3 semester hours.

Survey of major perspectives within contemporary (post-World War II) sociological theory, including phenomenology, symbolic interactionism, intersectionality, postmodernism, and globalization theory. This course focuses on the application of theory to analyzing current social issues and culture. Students will also learn how theory both enables and constrains research and practice. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. S

SOC 5521 Families in Social Context: 3 semester hours.

Examination of the family as a social institution shaped by larger social structures. The course introduces students to basic concepts and theories, historical perspectives, facts, and processes of family formation and dissolution. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. Equivalent to SOWK 5521. F, S

SOC 5531 Criminology: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of criminal law, law enforcement, judicial roles and processes, correctional approaches, the criminal offender and societal reactions. Theory and research as applicable to behavior and institutional relations. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. S

SOC 5536 Elite Deviance and Crime: 3 semester hours.

Explores the types of criminal behaviors engaged in by the American socioeconomic and corporate elite. The course first explores and identifies who this elite is and then examines their ideological and economic history in American society. Specific examples of elite and corporate crime are presented and discussed in class. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. Equivalent to SOWK 5536. EF

SOC 5538 Sexual Crimes: 3 semester hours.

Complex relationships of human sexuality to law and crime. A range of sexual attitudes, practices and lifestyles will be discussed in the context of cultural norms, legal parameters and personal expression. Students will be introduced to cultural variations in defining and addressing sexuality and crime. Current theoretical explanations of sexual offending and U.S. social policies and clinical interventions for sexual offenders. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. Equivalent to SOWK 5538. S

SOC 5551 Victimology: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to theory and research about individuals and populations that have been victimized by interpersonal, institutional, and state sanctioned violence and abuse. Topics include: intimate partner violence, sexual assault, bias-related crimes, and post-trauma syndrome as a result of war, torture, social, or environmental catastrophes. Students will become acquainted with community services, specialized programs within the criminal justice system, and practitioners who treat "survivors" of violence and abuse. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. Equivalent to SOWK 5551. F

SOC 5552 Gang Violence: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the sociological study of juvenile street gangs, prison gangs, and organized crime syndicates with special attention devoted to violent behavior. Topics include: early development, definitions, immigration, ethnicity, gender, victimization, theories, prison gangs, desistance, American Mafia, Russian organized crime, outlaw motorcycle gangs, and drug trafficking. A central course goal is to better understand gangs in order to prevent their growth and proliferation. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. Equivalent to SOWK 5552. FO

SOC 5553 Serial Murder: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the sociological study of serial murder. Topics include: mass murder, typologies of serial murder, cults and the occult, psychopathology, sociological theories, sexual predators, criminal paraphilia, stalking, team killers, female serial murderers, victims, global issues, forensic science, and profiling. Understanding and applying competing theoretical perspectives is emphasized. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. SO

SOC 5554 Guns and Mass Shootings: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the sociological study of the role that guns have in the production of various types of violence, particularly mass killings. Topic include: guns as self-protection, the costs of gun violence, causes of gun violence, firearms regulation, effectiveness of gun policy, gun-related movements, trends in mass shootings, dangerous people and places, role of guns in mass killings, and mass shooting policies and preventions. Special attention will be devoted to proposed policies and their potential effectiveness. Equivalent to SOWK 5554. SE

SOC 5555 Prisons, Reentry, Reintegration: 3 semester hours.

A critical overview of the issues involved in the processes of incarceration, reentry, and reintegration into the community. Topics include: the historical origins of the prison, theories of correction, and the social factors that shape the prison and the context in which returning citizens reenter their communities. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. Equivalent to SOWK 5555. Su

SOC 5556 Substance Abuse: Family and Community: 3 semester hours.

Examination of substance abuse issues and problems within the context of families and communities, paying particular attention to differing theoretical frameworks and value systems. Students will study evidence-based models of prevention and intervention for those affected by addiction. Equivalent to SOWK 5556. S

SOC 5557 Fundamentals of Forensic Behavioral Science: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the multidisciplinary (neurobiological, psychological, sociological, anthropological) nature of forensic behavioral science with a particular emphasis on violent criminal behavior. Topics include pattern identification of violence, targeted public violence and threat assessment, crime prevention and safety planning, multidisciplinary psychosocial assessments, and expert witness and court testimony. The course is designed to help integrate coursework related to the forensic sciences. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. Equivalent to SOWK 5557. S

SOC 5559 MA Sociology Internship: 1-3 semester hours.

The MA sociology internship will give eligible graduate students the opportunity to explore the applied work of sociology in public and private agencies and organizations, private firms and foundations. Students will be placed in supervised internship positions commensurate with their skills, abilities and career goals. Only classified students with satisfactory academic progress are eligible for this course. May be repeated for a total of 6 credits. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.

SOC 5562 Power, Class, and Prestige: 3 semester hours.

Theories and empirical data on social inequality. Exploration of the unequal distribution of socioeconomic resources, social status, life chances, and access to power for different groups and persons in the United States. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. S

SOC 5566 Rural Sociology and Community Development: 3 semester hours.

Examines the social construction of rurality as well as sociological theories of rural community development and contemporary social processes related to social change and restructuring in rural communities. Overview of the demographic, economic, political, environmental, health, interpersonal, and criminological factors that shape opportunities and barriers to rural community development. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. Equivalent to SOWK 5566. SO

SOC 5567 Community Networking: Cultivating the Sociological Imagination: 3 semester hours.

Theories and empirical data on social inequality. Exploration of the unequal distribution of socioeconomic resources, social status, life chances,

SOC 5583 Independent Problems in Sociology: 1-4 semester hours.

Readings, observations, applied work, or data analysis in content area not offered in our curriculum. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

SOC 5591 Topics in Sociology: 3 semester hours.

Topical reading, discussion, exploration, experience, and demonstration of learning on selected topics. May be repeated for up to 9 credits with different content. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. D

SOC 5592 Topics in Criminology: 3 semester hours.

Topical reading, discussion, exploration, experience, and demonstration of learning on selected topics. May be repeated for up to 9 credits with different content. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. D

SOC 5599 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.

SOC 6600 Advanced Sociological Theory: 3 semester hours.

Comparison and application of contemporary theoretical perspectives in sociology. Students will learn to articulate and explain a sophisticated understanding of contemporary sociological theory and to apply contemporary sociological theory to a wide range of social dynamics. This course is especially designed to help sociology graduate students prepare theoretically for their Applied Project or Thesis research. F

SOC 6603 Qualitative Research Methods: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to qualitative research methods, including theory, design, fieldwork, and analysis, as well as presentation, writing, and reporting. F

SOC 6620 Advanced Sociological Seminar: 3 semester hours.

A reading and discussion seminar focused on selected sociological theoretical and empirical topics. Topics vary by semester. May be repeated up to 6 credits. S

SOC 6640 Applied Project: 1-6 semester hours.

Research, analysis, and writing of applied projects. 6 credits of SOC 6640 are required for students completing the applied project option for the M.A. in Sociology program. Continuous enrollment at a minimum of 1 credit must be maintained until the applied project is defended. May be repeated. Graded S/U.

SOC 6649 Independent Studies: 1-4 semester hours.

Consultation course consisting of independent student effort under the guidance of the instructor. Students are assigned to, or request assignment to, specific independent problems on the basis of interest and preparation. This may include preparation and presentation of a major research project, directed readings, or tutorial study. May be repeated.

SOC 6650 Thesis: 1-6 semester hours.

Research, analysis, and writing of thesis. 6 credits of SOC 6650 are required for students completing the thesis option for the M.A. in Sociology program. Continuous enrollment at a minimum of 1 credit must be maintained until the thesis is defended. May be repeated. Graded S/U.

SOC 6699 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content. May be repeated.