Homeland Security and Emergency Management (HSEM)

How to Read Course Descriptions

Courses

HSEM 5510 Critical Issues and Systems Thinking in Homeland Security and Emergency Management: 3 semester hours.

Course description: Elevates critical thinking to examine complex systems surrounding traditional and emerging

HSEM 5520 The Resilience Factor: Building Disaster Resistant Society: 3 semester hours.

Course description: Explores the need to continually expand and improve our response and mitigation capabilities

HSEM 5530 Analyzing Risk and Protecting Critical Systems: 3 semester hours.

Course description: Focuses on the threats, vulnerabilities, risks, and consequences of critical infrastructure and the

HSEM 5540 Health and Medical Disaster Management: 3 semester hours.

Explores and evaluates public health emergency systems and capabilities related to crises such as pandemics, chemical and bioterrorism threats, contamination, and mass casualty incidents. Delves into managing the impacts of all hazard incidents for vulnerable populations and those with access and functional needs during response and recovery efforts. Develops analytic skills and strategies to improve public health policies, preparedness, and response systems. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

HSEM 5560 Multidisciplinary Approaches to Homeland Security: 3 semester hours.

Problems facing homeland security and emergency management leaders touch upon a range of

HSEM 5570 Successful HSEM Leadership: 3 semester hours.

Focuses on the qualities of leadership necessary to direct efforts in the critical arenas of homeland security and emergency management. Incorporates intensive case-studies and scenarios to analyze policies, legal structures, ethical dilemmas facing the homeland security and emergency management professional in a stressful and dynamic work environment. Examines the expectations and efficacy of leadership models, while

HSEM 6610 Cyber Threats and Security: 3 semester hours.

Advances cyber security leadership skills of current homeland security professionals and prepares a new generation of strategic leaders to secure the country's digital infrastructure. Explores the security of networks and digital security threats, offensive and defensive strategies, and system recovery priorities. Examines the use of the Internet in the new age of global terrorism and domestic violent extremists to recruit and organize.

HSEM 6620 Intelligence, Terrorism, and Domestic Violent Extremism: 3 semester hours.

Examines emerging terrorist threats to the U.S. and strategies to disrupt terrorist plots. Explores the life cycle of terrorist organizations, extreme acts of violence at public venues, and the role of counterintelligence. Studies the collection, analysis and evaluation of intelligence, the management of the intelligence function, and the influence of intelligence in shaping operational security decisions. Develops an understanding of intelligence tradecraft and the analytic and research skills used in intelligence work. Students analyze a case study of how a terrorist organization has ended, and the issues that impacted its demise to better understand how to counter current and future threats to homeland security. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

HSEM 6680 Capstone Project: 6 semester hours.

Graduate students must select one of two options (a thesis or a capstone project) to complete the final requirement in the MS degree program. Students who select a capstone project must identify and secure an organizational sponsor to support the project proposal. This could be a current employer or an organization the student identifies through initiative and outreach. Students will work with a faculty advisor and their project sponsor

HSEM 6690 Thesis: 1-6 semester hours.

Graduate students must select one of two options (a thesis or a capstone project) to complete the final requirement in the MS degree program. Students who select a thesis will collaborate with their advisor(s) to identify a research question that will add value to both the University?s body of work on the topic and to the homeland security enterprise. They will prepare a thesis proposal, conduct a literature review, gather and analyze