Homeland Security and Emergency Management (HSEM)

Courses

HSEM 5510 Critical Issues and Systems Thinking in Homeland Security and Emergency Management: 3 semester hours.

Elevates critical thinking to examine complex systems surrounding traditional and emerging issues unique to the homeland security enterprise. Concentration topics include evolving threats, and the countrys capabilities and readiness to prepare for and respond with agility. Among the issues examined will be the interface among different government and non-government organizations, crisis communications, legal and ethical issues, and the environmental drivers determining and shaping Homeland Security and Emergency Management policies and practice.

HSEM 5520 The Resilience Factor: Building Disaster Resistant Society: 3 semester hours.

Explores the need to continually expand and improve our response and mitigation capabilities for evolving hazards and threats. This course examines the effectiveness of the response to and management of disasters through recent incidents, case studies, and the application of social science research and a resiliency framework. Issues explored include the challenges of escalating disaster costs, social capital engagement, mitigation and repetitive losses, local and state policies, and shrinking budgets. Rather than an introduction to emergency management tools and techniques, this course leverages innovation and futuristic thinking to employ alternate, community-focused strategies to build resiliency.

HSEM 5530 Analyzing Risk and Protecting Critical Systems: 3 semester hours.

Focuses on the threats, vulnerabilities, risks, and consequences of critical infrastructure and the interdependencies associated with essential services and systems. Explores risk methodologies to narrow in on the critical nodes of highly connected lifeline sectors and systems. Building upon an emerging risk picture, students develop risk reduction strategies and determine how to allocate resources to decrease the likelihood of critical system failures and lessen the impact of disasters, to maintain essential services for the American public. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

HSEM 5540 Health and Medical Disaster Management: 3 semester hours.

Explores and evaluates public health emergency systems and capabilities related to crises such as pandemics, chemical and bioterrorism threats, contamination, and mass casualty incidents. Delves into managing the impacts of all hazard incidents for vulnerable populations and those with access and functional needs during response and recovery efforts. Develops analytic skills and strategies to improve public health policies, preparedness, and response systems. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

HSEM 5560 Multidisciplinary Approaches to Homeland Security: 3 semester hours.

Problems facing homeland security and emergency management leaders touch upon a range of disciplines across the homeland security enterprise. This course examines coordination challenges spanning an ever-changing landscape of partners in the public and private sector. Interdependencies coupled with unique expertise and capabilities brings many partners to the table but does not ensure a smooth interface among all parties. Students unpack systemic coordination challenges to develop effective regional approaches that maximize available resources across disciplines. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

HSEM 5570 Successful HSEM Leadership: 3 semester hours.

Focuses on the qualities of leadership necessary to direct efforts in the critical arenas of homeland security and emergency management. Incorporates intensive case-studies and scenarios to analyze policies, legal structures, ethical dilemmas facing the homeland security and emergency management professional in a stressful and dynamic work environment. Examines the expectations and efficacy of leadership models, while students leverage their own skills and experience to support the complex adaptive systems needed to address the homeland security challenges beyond the horizon. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

HSEM 6610 Cyber Threats and Security: 3 semester hours.

Advances cyber security leadership skills of current homeland security professionals and prepares a new generation of strategic leaders to secure the country's digital infrastructure. Explores the security of networks and digital security threats, offensive and defensive strategies, and system recovery priorities. Examines the use of the Internet in the new age of global terrorism and domestic violent extremists to recruit and organize. Examines the consequences of intentional cyber-attacks in the virtual world with a focus on intelligence issues. Students investigate strategies to detect, to protect critical information against hackers, terrorists, and cyber criminals, and to prioritize the recovery critical systems. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

HSEM 6620 Intelligence, Terrorism, and Domestic Violent Extremism: 3 semester hours.

Examines emerging terrorist threats to the U.S. and strategies to disrupt terrorist plots. Explores the life cycle of terrorist organizations, extreme acts of violence at public venues, and the role of counterintelligence. Studies the collection, analysis and evaluation of intelligence, the management of the intelligence function, and the influence of intelligence in shaping operational security decisions. Develops an understanding of intelligence tradecraft and the analytic and research skills used in intelligence work. Students analyze a case study of how a terrorist organization has ended, and the issues that impacted its demise to better understand how to counter current and future threats to homeland security. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

HSEM 6680 Capstone Project: 6 semester hours.

Graduate students must select one of two options (a thesis or a capstone project) to complete the final requirement in the MS degree program. Students who select a capstone project must identify and secure an organizational sponsor to support the project proposal. This could be a current employer or an organization the student identifies through initiative and outreach. Students will work with a faculty advisor and their project sponsor throughout the final 16-week term to provide analyzed research results, a project proposal, or a completed project that meets the needs of the designated partner organization. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

HSEM 6690 Thesis: 1-6 semester hours.

Graduate students must select one of two options (a thesis or a capstone project) to complete the final requirement in the MS degree program. Students who select a thesis will collaborate with their advisor(s) to identify a research question that will add value to both the Universitys body of work on the topic and to the homeland security enterprise. They will prepare a thesis proposal, conduct a literature review, gather and analyze data, conduct and interpret their research, and summarize their research findings. Thesis students are guided through the components of the thesis with their advisor(s). This option provides flexibility for students to make progress at a pace that works for them throughout the 16-month program. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.