English and Philosophy

English and Philosophy

Chair and Professor: J. Atteberry

Director of Philosophy and Professor: Wahl

Graduate Program Director and Associate Professor: Winston

Composition Director and Associate Professor: Hellwig

Professors: B. Attebery, J. Attebery, Baergen, A.Johnson, M. Johnson, Klein, Levenson, Schmidt, Whitaker, Wolter

Assistant Professors: Berger, Lawrimore, Levay, Schultz-Hurst, Van Winkle, Watkins, Wilkes

The Department of English and Philosophy offers graduate curricula in English studies that include courses in language, literature, composition/rhetoric, and English pedagogy. The Department offers the Master of Arts and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees.

Admission Requirements for International Students

Students whose native language is not English must achieve at least one of the following minimum scores to be considered for admission into the master's or doctoral program in English: TOEFL 80(internet-based)/213(computer-based)/550 (paper-based); MTELP 84; IELTS 6.5.

Goals

The Department has articulated the following goals and student learning outcomes for students in graduate programs:

Learning Objectives - Master of Arts

Stated Mission and Goals: The M.A. program provides advanced training in British and American literature and culture, and opportunities to pursue advanced work in other areas of English studies, including linguistics, TESOL, and composition. the M.A. provides students with training to enter any field where verbal and analytical ability is essential, especially teaching, as well as preparation for further graduate work in Ph.D. programs.

Student Learning Objectives

  1. M.A. students will understand major literary traditions in British and U.S. cultures.
  2. M.A. students will understand ways that literary works are shaped by and participate in broad cultural trends.
  3. M.A. students will understand important theoretical approaches to the study of literature and culture.
  4. M.A. students will analyze and synthesize on-going scholarly conversations in English studies and situate their arguments in relation to these conversations.
  5. M.A. students will understand linguistic structures (i.e. language and/or rhetoric) and employ this understanding in their readings of texts and in their writing.

Learning Objectives - Doctor of Philosophy

Stated Mission and Goals: The Doctor of Philosophy in English and the Teaching of English is a terminal degree program that trains students for teaching careers in English at colleges and universities.

Student Learning Objectives

  1. Ph.D. students will have a professional understanding of major literary traditions in British and U.S. cultures;
  2. Ph.D. students will have a professional understanding of the ways that literary works are shaped by and participate in broad cultural trends;
  3. Ph.D. students will understand important theoretical approaches to the study of literature and culture and employ these theories in their research and writing;
  4. Ph.D. students will define, research, and complete a significant research project within English studies, and be prepared to conduct research independently once they graduate.
  5. Ph.D. students will understand linguistic structures (i.e. language and/or rhetoric) and employ this understanding in their readings of texts and in their writing.
  6. Ph.D. students will understand theories of college-level English teaching and will be able to effectively translate these theories into practice.
  7. Ph.D. students will be prepared for future professional activities as college-level English teachers

Learning Objectives - Graduate Certificate in TESOL 

Stated Mission and Goals: The Graduate Certificate in TESOL program provides theoretical and practical training for students who wish to teach English to speakers of other languages. The Certificate prepares students to pursue employment in any setting where English is taught as a second or foreign language, with an emphasis placed on post-secondary learners. 

Student Learning Objectives 

  1. Certificate students will gain a broad understanding of the various areas of study in the field of linguistics.
  2. Certificate students will gain an understanding of, and be able to apply, the major theoretical approaches to second language acquisition.
  3. Certificate students will learn to develop effective curricula, courses, and activities for teaching English as a second or foreign language.
  4. Certificate students will demonstrate mastery of their knowledge and skills in a classroom setting.
     

        

Doctor of Philosophy in English and the Teaching of English

The Doctor of Philosophy in English and the Teaching of English prepares students for teaching careers in English at colleges and universities.

The program emphasizes the study of English and American literature, course work in content-specific pedagogy, and supervised teaching internships. Students also undertake directed, specialized research in a required dissertation.

Admission Requirements

For full consideration for admission and financial aid, applications for fall admission must arrive by February 15.

Applicants for classified admission and/or financial support must submit the following materials:

  1. Undergraduate and graduate transcripts.
  2. An M.A. in English (or appropriate related field) with an accumulative grade point average of 3.5 in M.A.-level English courses.
  3. Three letters of recommendation from professors who can comment on the student’s recent academic work.
  4. Scores at or above the 50th percentile on the verbal section of the GRE general test. Scores on the analytical writing section will also be considered in admission decisions.
  5. A writing sample (about 10-20 pages).
  6. A brief statement (about 500 words) describing the applicant’s academic background, reasons for applying to the program, research interests, and professional goals.

The Graduate Committee in consultation with the department Chair evaluates these materials to determine admission to the program. Priority will be given to experienced, successful teachers. 

General Requirements

The Doctor of Philosophy in English requires a minimum of 39 semester credits beyond the M.A.

A course completed as part of a student’s M.A. program may be approved by the Graduate Director to satisfy a particular requirement of the Ph.D. program, up to a maximum of 9 credits; however, the substitution of course work does not waive the minimum credit requirement for the Ph.D. program.

With the approval of the Graduate Director, students may transfer up to 9 credits of coursework beyond the M.A. from other institutions.

Students must maintain a 3.5 grade point average to advance to candidacy for the Ph.D. Three grades below B- during the entire program will automatically disqualify a student.

Graduate students must follow the policy on incomplete grades as it is listed in the Idaho State University Graduate Catalog. Teaching assistantships and Ph.D. fellowships will not be renewed for students with incomplete grades on their transcripts. 

Special Requirements

  1. Student must complete at least 27 of the required 39 credits at the 6600 level or higher.
  2. Students must complete two supervised teaching internships. The student must submit a detailed proposal for each internship to the Graduate Committee for approval prior to the semester of the internship. The proposal must be endorsed by the member of the graduate faculty who has agreed to supervise the internship. An unacceptable Ph.D. internship will have the same consequences as a course grade of C.
  3. Students will write a dissertation with a section exploring the implications of the research for the student’s teaching of English. This dissertation project will be designed in consultation with a member of the English graduate faculty, who will serve as chair of the dissertation committee. The dissertation committee shall consist of three members of the graduate faculty, at least two of whom are English graduate faculty. In consultation with the dissertation director, the student is responsible for assembling the dissertation committee. The dissertation proposal must be approved by all members of the student’s dissertation committee and then submitted, with the comprehensive exam lists attached, to the Graduate Director for review, according to the guidelines in the English Graduate Handbook. A Graduate Faculty Representative (GFR) will be appointed after review of the proposal and exam lists.
  4. Students must present a colloquium on the topic of the dissertation research, given in the last semester of their degree work, which will allow them to obtain experience in presenting the results of their research to their peers.  

Course Work

ENGL 6612Introduction to Graduate Studies in English (A 6600-level seminar focusing on pre-1800 literature)3
A 6600-level seminar focusing on pre-1800 literature3
A 6600-level seminar focusing on post-1800 literature3
One course in English language studies, chosen from the following group:3
Advanced Composition
Varieties of American English
Studies in Grammar
Special Topics in Linguistics
Linguistic Analysis
Old English
History of the English Language
Introduction to Sociolinguistics
Introduction to Linguistics
Seminar in Linguistics
Rhetorical Theory
Rhetorical Criticism
Students appointed to teaching assistantships must also take the following 6 required credits:
Seminar in Teaching Writing
Practicum in Teaching Composition
Total Hours12
 

Course Work Limitations 

A maximum of 6 semester credits taken outside of ENGL-prefixed courses may be counted toward degree requirements, with the approval of the Graduate Director.

Comprehensive Examination

Students are eligible to take the comprehensive exam after completing 36 credits beyond the M.A. Students must take the exam before defending the dissertation.

The comprehensive examination is both written and oral. The examination tests the student in the general areas listed below, but the student in consultation with his/her dissertation committee will design the specific subjects and reading lists on which he/she will be tested. The exam lists must be approved by all members of the student’s dissertation committee and then submitted, along with the dissertation proposal, to the Graduate Director for review, according to the guidelines in the English Graduate Handbook.

The exam areas are:

a. The student’s dissertation area

b. A broader field or literary period

c. An area in the teaching of English

The examining committee will consist of the three-member dissertation committee. In order to ensure that the examining committee has sufficient expertise to test the student in all three exam areas, the dissertation committee chair may propose to substitute a member of the dissertation committee with another member of the graduate faculty, so long as two members of the examining committee are English graduate faculty. The substitution must be approved by the Graduate Director.

The comprehensive examination may be repeated only once, and must be retaken within 12 months.

Foreign Language Requirement

Students must demonstrate proficiency in one foreign language, either modern or ancient, before the program of study is complete. The purpose of this requirement is for students to have a current knowledge of a language other than English and of its relation to the culture from which it originates.

Students may satisfy this requirement in one of the following ways:

  1. By passing four semesters of one foreign language with an average grade of B, either during the course of study for the graduate degree or with an interval of no longer than two years between the completion of the last language course and the beginning of graduate study in English at Idaho State University.
  2. By passing with a grade of B a two-part examination administered by the Foreign Language Department.
  3. By having completed a major in a foreign language, as verified by a college transcript.
  4. By having satisfied a foreign language requirement as part of having completed an M.A. in English with an interval of no longer than two years between the completion of the last language course and the beginning of graduate study in English at Idaho State University.

Students who have a first language other than English will be considered to have satisfied this requirement.

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Master of Arts in English

The Master of Arts in English prepares graduates for careers and for doctoral study in English and closely related fields. The program emphasizes study in English and American literature and requires course work in the English language and linguistics. A well-developed mentoring program provides supervised teaching experience in composition for students holding assistantships.

Admission Requirements

Applications for admission and funding are due February 15th (to begin in fall semester), and October 1st (to begin in spring semester). Applicants must apply to and meet all criteria for admission to the Graduate School. In addition to the general requirements of the Graduate School, applicants must submit the following materials:

  1. All undergraduate and any graduate transcripts, showing accumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 over the last 60+/- credits (90 +/- for quarters) undergraduate coursework.
  2. GRE general test scores, a score at or above the 50th percentile on the verbal section of the GRE general test. Scores on the analytical writing section will also be considered in admission decisions.
  3. Three letters of recommendation, preferably from professors who know the student’s recent academic work.
  4. A brief statement (about 500 words) of academic and professional goals.
  5. A brief writing sample (about 5 pages). The English Department Admissions Committee, in consultation with the department chair, evaluates the applicant’s materials to determine admission to the program. When these materials are evaluated, the Admissions Committee will look at the student’s preparation for graduate work in English, his/her academic promise (as indicated by transcripts, GRE scores, and letters of recommendation), and the fit between the student’s goals (as indicated in their statement) and the mission and strengths of the M.A. program.

Students admitted to the M.A. program are called Classified students. Some students may be admitted as Classified with performance requirements which means they must fulfill certain requirements specifically indicated with their admission and are not eligible for graduate assistantship support until they achieve Classified status. Continuation in the program is subject to a student’s meeting this requirement. Students admitted without at least 21 credits of undergraduate courses in English, excluding freshman composition, may be required to make up deficiencies in their undergraduate work.

General Requirements

The Master of Arts in English program requires a minimum of 30 semester credits in courses approved by the Department of English. Students must take at least 18 of these credits in courses at the 6600-level courses or higher.

Students may fulfill these credit requirements in one of three options:

  1. Final Exam Option: The student takes 30 credits of coursework, at least 18 of which must be at the 6600-level, and complete a final exam. OR
  2. M.A. Paper Option: The student completes 30 credits, including at least 18 credits at the 6600-level, and completes a 3-credit final M.A. Paper, a revised paper based on work done in a course completed as part of the M.A. program, which must be submitted with a cover letter, CV, and statement describing their rationale for choosing the paper and the revision process. Up to 3 credits of portfolio work may count toward the 6600-level requirement. OR
  3. Thesis Option: The student completes 30 credits, including at least 18 credits at the 6600-level, and completes a thesis. Up to 6 credits of thesis may count toward the 6600-level requirement.

Students selecting any of these options must also demonstrate proficiency in one foreign language and may do so in the following ways:

  1. By demonstrating that they have obtained an intermediate level of competence in a foreign language, equal to completing the second sophomore-level (2200-level) course with a grade of B or better. Students may demonstrate this proficiency in one of three ways:
    • By completing all foreign language coursework (at the 2200-level or above) with an average grade of B or better, and with an interval of no longer than four years between the conclusion of the last language class and the beginning of graduate study in English at Idaho State University.
    • By passing the equivalent of four semesters of one foreign language with an average grade of B or better.
    • By passing the CLEP exam and earning credit for a 2200 course.  OR
  2. By passing with a grade of B or better a two-part examination administered by the Language and Literature Department. OR
  3. By having completed a major or a minor in a foreign language, as verified by a college transcript. OR
  4. By taking 6 credits beyond the normal 3 credits of required Language Studies coursework. These 6 credits, which do not count toward the degree requirements, must include:
    1. Old English and History of English Language OR
    2. or , plus one additional course in linguistics approved by the department OR
  5. By having a first language other than English.

All students must maintain a satisfactory record of scholarship. Three grades below B- during the entire program will automatically disqualify a student from continuing in the program.

Graduate students must follow the policy on incomplete grades as it is listed in the Idaho State University Graduate Catalog.

Teaching Assistantships will not be renewed for students with incomplete grades on their transcripts.

All students must take the following 12 required credits:

ENGL 6612Introduction to Graduate Studies in English (A 6600-level seminar focusing on pre-1800 literature)3
A 6600-level seminar focusing on pre-1800 literature3
A 6600-level seminar focusing on post-1800 literature3
One course in English language studies, chosen from the following group:3
Advanced Composition
Varieties of American English
Studies in Grammar
Special Topics in Linguistics
Linguistic Analysis
Old English
History of the English Language
Introduction to Linguistics
Introduction to Sociolinguistics
Introduction to Linguistics
Seminar in Linguistics
Rhetorical Theory
Rhetorical Criticism
Students appointed to teaching assistantships must also take the following 6 required credits:
Seminar in Teaching Writing
Practicum in Teaching Composition
Total Hours12
 

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TESOL Certificate

Recommendations regarding admission will be made by the co-directors of the TESOL program in conjunction with the Graduate Director.

Admission Requirements

For admission into the TESOL Certificate program, applicants must satisfy the following criteria:

  1. A bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution.
  2. An accumulative grade point average of 3.0 over the last two years of undergraduate course work for the B.A.
  3. In addition to the Graduate School requirements, score at or above the 35th percentile on the verbal section of the GRE general test.
  4. Three letters of recommendation, preferably from professors, or colleagues who know the applicant’s recent academic or professional work.
  5. Applicants whose first language is not English need to meet the following TOEFL requirements for Classified admission:
    1. Internet-based test (iBT): a total score of 80 with a score of at least 20 on each Section (graduate assistants who teach courses must score 23 or above on the Speaking Section) on the iBT; or
    2. Computer-based test: a total score of 213 with a score of at least 21 on Section 1 (Listening Comprehension) on the computer test; or
    3. Paper-based test: a total score of 550 with a score of at least 55 on Section l (Listening Comprehension) on the paper test, or a score of 84 on the MTELP, or a score of 6 on the IELTS.

It is strongly recommended that applicants have some knowledge of a second language.

General Requirements

The certificate program is 18 credits and is granted alone or in addition to a graduate degree.

All students must take the following 12 credits:

ENGL 6680Introduction to Linguistics3
ENGL 6681Theory of Second Language Acquisition3
ENGL 6682TESL Methodology3
ENGL 7783Practicum in Second Language Teaching3
Total Hours12

In addition to the required courses, students must take two 3-credit electives chosen from the graduate-level linguistics offerings in either the Department of English and Philosophy or the Department of Anthropology.

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How to Read Course Descriptions

Courses

ENGL 5501 Advanced Composition: 3 semester hours.

An advanced course in which students develop an independent style in writing such types of essays as the personal, biographical, argumentative, and critical. May contain prose analysis. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5506 Advanced Creative Writing: 3 semester hours.

Production and discussion of student writing. Study in a specific genre. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5507 Topics in Professional Writing: 3 semester hours.

Topics in professional writing, including standard genres, new media, and emerging trends in research and the workplace. Emphasis on developing practical skills, theoretical knowledge, and finished professional documents related to the topic. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities are identified in the course syllabus. May be repeated once with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credits. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or permission of instructor

ENGL 5509 Literary Magazine Production: 3 semester hours.

Hands-on experience in literary magazine production: editing, proofreading, and design. Strategies for screening and selecting stories, poems, and reviews. Consideration of the role of the small press in national literary culture. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5531 Teaching and Writing Projects Special Topics: 3 semester hours.

Aids teachers of all grade levels and all academic subjects in developing skills in teaching writing. Combines composition theory and practical classroom exercises with ongoing writing and critiques. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5540 Philosophy and Literature: 3 semester hours.

Reflections on the relation between poetic and speculative discourse. Topics include forms of consciousness, temporality and narrative, metaphysics of genre. Equivalent to PHIL 5540. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5541 History of Literary Criticism: 3 semester hours.

Teaches major theorists and debates that have influenced the interpretation of literature. Students read key theoretical texts. Course may use a thematic or chronological approach. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5553 American Indian Literature: 3 semester hours.

Considers literary works by and about North American native people, especially in relationship to history, genre, and culture, including oral traditions. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5555 Studies in a National Literature: 3 semester hours.

Studies in important literatures and cultures not otherwise covered in the curriculum. Will include literatures in translation and literature written in English outside of America and the British Isles. Equivalent to LANG 5515 and CMLT 5515. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5556 Comparative Literature: 3 semester hours.

The analysis of ideas, problems, and techniques common to important writers of various national literatures. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5561 Classical Literature: 3 semester hours.

Study of the major literature of the classical Greek and Roman periods, especially in relationship to its cultural backgrounds. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5562 Medieval Literature: 3 semester hours.

Study of the major literature of the Middle Ages and its background, with emphasis upon the development of English literature. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5563 Renaissance Literature: 3 semester hours.

Study of the major literature of the Renaissance and its background, with emphasis upon the development of English literature. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5564 Seventeenth Century Literature: 3 semester hours.

Study of the major literature of the seventeenth century and its background, with emphasis on English or American or other literature of the period. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5565 Eighteenth Century Literature: 3 semester hours.

Study of the major literature of the eighteenth century and its background, with emphasis on English or American or other literature of the period. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5566 Early Nineteenth Century Literature: 3 semester hours.

Study of the major literature of the early nineteenth century and its background, with emphasis on English or American or other literature of the period. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5567 Late Nineteenth Century Literature: 3 semester hours.

Study of the major literature of the late nineteenth century and its background, with emphasis on English or American or other literature of the period. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5568 Early Twentieth Century Literature: 3 semester hours.

Study of the major literature of the early twentieth century and its background, with emphasis on English or American or other literature of the period. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5569 Contemporary Literature: 3 semester hours.

Study of recent major literature and its background, with emphasis on English or American or other literature of the period. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5570 Post-Colonial Literature: 3 semester hours.

Study of post-colonial literary texts, with attention to the role of literature in history, political resistance, and social movements of one or more colonized cultures. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5572 Proseminar in a Major Literary Figure: 3 semester hours.

Intensive study in a single major author other than Chaucer, Milton, and Shakespeare. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5573 Chaucer: 3 semester hours.

Intensive study of selected works of Chaucer. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5574 Milton: 3 semester hours.

Intensive study of selected works of Milton. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5576 Shakespeare: 3 semester hours.

Intensive study of selected works of Shakespeare. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5577 Shakespeare in Performance: 3 semester hours.

Intensive study of selected works by Shakespeare, with emphasis placed upon performance issues. Includes field trip to attend live dramatic productions of Shakespearian plays. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5580 Varieties of American English: 3 semester hours.

In-depth study of various dialects of American English, including historical evolution of different dialects, effects of migration on dialects, and influences of non-English immigrant languages on development of American English. Field-work studying the Snake River dialects of Idaho. Equivalent to ANTH 5580. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5581 Studies in Grammar: 3 semester hours.

Focus on the study of transformational-generative grammar and its application to sentence level problems. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5584 Special Topics in Linguistics: 3 semester hours.

Rotating topics in different areas of linguistics. Consult current schedule of classes for exact course being taught. May be repeated. PREREQ: ANTH/LANG/ENGL 1107. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5585 Linguistic Analysis: 3 semester hours.

Advanced topics course in the techniques of language analysis. Examples are phonology and morphology, semantics, or rhetorical grammar. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5586 Old English: 3 semester hours.

Intensive study of the Old English language, with attention to its intrinsic structure and its relation to Middle and Modern English. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5587 History of the English Language: 3 semester hours.

Linguistic and historical study of the major changes and developments in the English Language. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5588 Introduction to Sociolinguistics: 3 semester hours.

Study of the patterned covariation of language and society, social dialects and social styles in language; problems of bilingualism, multilingualism, creoles and language uses. Equivalent to ANTH 5550. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5590 Topics in Folklore: 3 semester hours.

Focused study of an issue in folkloristics or a particular genre of folklore, including history of the scholarship concerning that issue or genre. Rotating topics. Repeatable with different topics. Equivalent to ANTH 5590. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5592 Folklore and Literature: 3 semester hours.

Study of cross-influences between oral and written literatures. Emphasis may be on a written genre that imitates and draws upon oral genres, a movement or period in which oral tradition strongly influences written forms, or a particular writer who incorporates motifs and storytelling patterns from folklore. Rotating topics. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5597 Professional Education Development Topics: 1-3 semester hour.

A course for practicing professionals aimed at the development and improvement of skills. May not be applied to graduate degrees. May be repeated. May be graded S/U. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 5599 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hour.

This is an experimental course. The course title and number of credits are noted by course section and announced in the class schedule by the scheduling department. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times. May be repeated. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 6610 Careers in English: 1 semester hour.

Preparation for English job searches and teaching careers. Does not count toward degree requirements. Graded S/U. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 6611 Literary Theory and Criticism: 3 semester hours.

Focused study of selected literary theories/critical approaches and their applications. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 6612 Introduction to Graduate Studies in English: 3 semester hours.

Introduces students to major literary theories and approaches and trains them in scholarly research methods. Requires development of a substantial research proposal. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 6613 Literary Bibliography Manuscripts and Editing: 3 semester hours.

Training in bibliographical, manuscript, and/or editing methodologies relevant to English. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 6621 Seminar in a Major Literary Genre: 3 semester hours.

Focused study of the theory and conventions of a major form (such as lyric poetry or novel) or a broader genre (such as realism, pastoral, or the fantastic). Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 6623 Seminar in Literary Themes: 3 semester hours.

Focused study of literature cohering around thematic content (such as religion, exploration, or diaspora). Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 6625 Seminar in a Literary Period: 3 semester hours.

Focused study of a literary period and issues in periodization. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 6627 Seminar in Major Literary Figures: 3 semester hours.

Focused study of the writings of one or two major writers. Critical and biographical topics and historical significance may be considered. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 6630 Special Topics in Pedagogy: 3 semester hours.

Focused study of topics regularly covered in ENGL 6631, ENGL 6632, or ENGL 6633. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 6631 Seminar in Teaching Writing: 3 semester hours.

Systematic application of contemporary composition theory to the teaching of writing; includes readings in and discussion of theories, research issues, and practices relevant to effective teaching and learning in composition classrooms. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 6631L Teaching Composition Lab: 1 semester hour.

Lab for English 6631. Experiential training for new M.A. TAs. Requires attending graduate faculty mentor's English 1101, regular meetings with mentor, teaching five times, and supervised grading. Graded S/U with written report by mentor. Required of first-semester M.A. TAs. Does not count toward degree requirements. PREREQ or COREQ: ENGL 6631. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 6632 Seminar in Teaching Literature: 3 semester hours.

Theoretical and practical approaches to teaching literature and literary interpretation at the undergraduate level, with attention to issues in course design and implementation, such as designing syllabi, leading discussion, and grading papers. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 6633 Seminar in Teaching Business and Professional Writing: 3 semester hours.

Preparation to teach undergraduate business and technical writing courses, including the nature and history of business and technical writing, as well as attention to practical issues in teaching, such as pedagogical strategies, textbook choice, and research design. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 6635 Special Topics in the Teaching of English: 3 semester hours.

Focused study of topics in English pedagogy that are not regularly covered in ENGL 6631, ENGL 6632, ENGL 6633, ENGL 6681, or ENGL 6682. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 6640 Interdisciplinary Seminar: 3 semester hours.

Focused study of a literary or literary-related problem or subject using the theories and methods of literature and other closely-related disciplines such as folklore, communications, rhetorical studies, history, linguistics, or anthropology. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 6642 Seminar in Oral and Popular Culture: 3 semester hours.

Focused study of a body of oral and/or popular cultural expression in related historical and cultural contexts with emphasis on literary connections. Repeartable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 6650 MA Thesis: 1-6 semester hour.

Master's thesis. Optional. Graded S/U. May be repeated

ENGL 6651 MA Paper: 1-3 semester hour.

Substantial revision of a graduate paper to produce a manuscript suitable for submission to a peer-reviewer publication in the field. M.A. Program only. Optional. Graded S/U. May be repeated. Up to 3 credits may count toward degree requirements

ENGL 6662 Seminar in Creative Writing: 3 semester hours.

Advanced study of creative writing. Course involves intensive readings in one or more selected genres (poetry, prose, drama), analyzed from the perspective of criticism and craft, and the development of course-related writing projects. PREREQ: ENGL 5506 or equivalent. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 6680 Introduction to Linguistics: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to fundamental concepts and methodologies of modern linguistics, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, sociolinguistics, programmatics, and language acquisition. May include opportunities to explore the practical application of course topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 6681 Theory of Second Language Acquisition: 3 semester hours.

The course will: 1) address theories describing the processes underlying second language acquisition, as well as relevant research, 2) consider what conditions increase the likelihood of successful second language acquisition, and 3) review the implications of 1 and 2 for second language learning and teaching. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 6682 TESL Methodology: 3 semester hours.

Building on the theoretical framework of ENGL 6681, students develop effective ESL materials and curricula, taking into account SLA research as well as the characteristics, needs, and motivation of learners. The class will involve a large practical component. PREREQ or COREQ: ENGL 6681, and Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 6685 Seminar in Linguistics: 3 semester hours.

Advanced studies in selected topics in linguistics. Course includes application of linguistic theories to specific forms of communication within the discipline of English. Repeatable with different topics. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 6690 Graduate Reading: 1-3 semester hour.

Supplementary reading course, arranged on an individual basis, to cover course content not otherwise available in the graduate program. Requires conferences with a faculty supervisor, written assignments or examination, and approval of a prospectus by the Graduate Committee. Repeatable with different topics. Does not count toward degree requirements

ENGL 6694 Dissertation and Comprehensive Exam Preparation: 1-6 semester hour.

Student prepares a dissertation proposal and comprehensive exam lists and studies for qualifying exams in consultation with his or her dissertation director. Requires dissertation director's approval of projected dissertation research area, exam areas, and committee members. Limited to Ph.D. students only. Does not count toward degree requirements. May be repeated. Graded S/U

ENGL 6699 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hour.

This is an experimental course. The course title and number of credits are noted by course section and announced in the class schedule by the scheduling department. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times. May be repeated. PREREQ: Classified Graduate Status or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 7700 Supervised Teaching Internship: 3 semester hours.

Practical experience in classroom or laboratory teaching. Enrollment limited to

ENGL 7731 Practicum in Teaching Composition: 3 semester hours.

Teaching composition under supervision. Required of, and limited to, second semester M.A. teaching assistants. PREREQ: ENGL 6631. Graded S/U

ENGL 7750 Doctoral Thesis: 1-9 semester hour.

Doctoral thesis, consisting of two papers, each the equivalent of a well-developed article. D.A. program only. 1-9 credits. Repeatable. Graded S/U

ENGL 7783 Practicum in Second Language Teaching: 3 semester hours.

Supervised practicum in ELS teaching or tutoring. Required for TESOL certificate. PREREQ: ENGL 6681, ENGL 6682 and 12-15 credits toward TESOL certificate

ENGL 8850 Doctoral Dissertation: 1-9 semester hour.

Research project with a section exploring implications for the teaching of English. Ph.D. program only. Variable credit. May be repeated. Graded S/U

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