Psychology

Psychology

Chair and Professor: Lynch

Professors: Lawyer, Letzring, Rasmussen, Turley-Ames, Wong

Associate Professors: Brumley

Assistant Professors: Aubuchon-Endsley, Fulton, McCarrey, Rieske, Swift, Xu

Visiting Assistant Professor: Miyake

Adjunct Faculty: Landers, Pongratz, Staley

Emeritus:  Enloe, Hatzenbuehler, Joe, Roberts

Doctor of Philosophy in Clinical Psychology

Doctoral training in clinical psychology is fully accredited by the American Psychological Association. All educational experiences needed to obtain a license to practice psychology in Idaho, and most other states and provinces, are offered. Theory, research, and practice are integrated into a comprehensive, five-year program. It is the goal of the doctoral training program to produce clinical psychologists who are well trained in the science of human behavior and its application to diverse clinical populations. All students are required to participate in course work and practica that emphasize assessments and treatments in all major areas of child and adult psychopathology. Evaluations of each student’s clinical-professional development and scholarship-research skills are continuous.

Goals

Five program goals have been defined:

  • research knowledge and skills;
  • professional knowledge and skills;
  • integration of science and practice;
  • professional identification and ethical practice; and
  • appreciation of individual differences, cultural differences, and diversity of practice.

Each goal has associated objectives and competencies.

Doctor of Philosophy in Experimental Psychology

Doctoral training in Experimental Psychology provides students with education and research training in the core areas of psychological science, e.g., personality, social psychology, learning, cognition, developmental psychology, and behavioral neuroscience. Students who complete the doctoral program may pursue academic or non-academic careers. To prepare for their future careers, students need to (i) have a solid foundation in basic areas of psychology (breadth of knowledge) and also (ii) develop an expertise in their research areas (depth of knowledge). Our program offers a variety of courses to help students accomplish their career goals.

Goals

Four program goals have been defined: research knowledge and expertise; breadth of knowledge and integration of core areas in psychology; competencies in scientific methodology and analysis; and effective communication skills. Each goal has associated objectives and competencies.

Master of Science in Psychology

Goals

To ensure that students who receive a master’s degree in psychology will be prepared for further post-graduate study and for careers in related areas, the department has identified the following goals: an understanding of core areas and the breadth of the field of psychology and its applications; ability to integrate knowledge and theories across, and to think critically about, topics within the domains of psychology; competence in library information technology and computer applications related to the study of psychology; competence in scientific methodology and analysis as they apply to the study of psychology; ability to communicate effectively, in both oral and written form, about issues within the field of psychology; active participation in the research process; and understanding and compliance with the APA code of ethics pertaining to research conduct. Each goal has associated objectives and competencies.

Doctor of Philosophy in Clinical Psychology

Admission Requirements

Admission requirements are as stated for the Master of Science in Psychology with the following additions: all students must have been recommended by the Clinical Admissions Committee of the Psychology Department.

General Requirements

All doctoral students must complete the Master of Science in Psychology, or its equivalent, as noted below. Students entering the doctoral training program at Idaho State University with a master’s degree from another institution will receive full or partial credit, based on an examination of completed course work and research. The department chair, the director of clinical training, and the departmental subject matter expert(s) will review all relevant documents and determine the course work and research, if any, that will be required to compensate for omissions and/or non-equivalency.

The following requirements are all in addition to the Master of Science requirements.

Required Courses
Assessment Sequence
PSYC 6620Psychodiagnostics I3
PSYC 6621Psychodiagnostics II3
PSYC 6623Advanced Psychological Measurements3
Clinical Core
PSYC 5512Ethical and Professional Issues in Psychology2
PSYC 6634Cultural Diversity and Individual Differences3
PSYC 6645Adult Psychopathology and Treatment I3
PSYC 6646Adult Psychopathology and Treatment II3
PSYC 6649Child Psychopathology and Treatment3
PSYC 7701Clinical Psychology2
PSYC 7702Introduction to Psychotropic Medication2
PSYC 7703Advanced Ethics and Professional Issues1
PSYC 7736Clinical Proseminar1-3
Practicum
PSYC 5517Interdisciplinary Evaluation Team1
PSYC 7724Community Practicum1-2
PSYC 7725Psychology Clinic Practicum1-2
PSYC 7727Psycho-Educational Evaluations1
PSYC 7749Clinical Internship1
Research
PSYC 8850Dissertation1-12
General Electives
Students must complete 3 additional graduate credits in psychology. Students may request the Clinical Training Committee to approve graduate credits in other departments to satisfy this requirement.
Methodological Elective
Students must complete an additional 3-credit course in advanced statistics acceptable to the Clinical Training Committee.
History and Systems Requirement
PSYC 6672History and Systems3
Minimum Total Credits69
 

The 12 elective credits earned for the Master of Science degree, described below, will satisfy course requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy, subject to the approval of the Departmental Chair.

Scholarship - Research Development

Upon completion of Area Requirements plus PSYC 6627 Statistics and Research Design I and PSYC 6632 Statistics and Research Design II, and the thesis prospectus, doctoral students are required to pass a Qualifying Exam to be admitted to doctoral candidacy. The exam samples each student’s integrative writing skills and conceptual abilities. Students write independently on integrative topics from across the foundational areas of general psychology or from an individualized and focused area of scholarly research.

Students may be admitted to candidacy for the doctoral degree upon satisfactory completion of the Master of Science degree (or its equivalent) and the Qualifying Exam. Candidates for the doctoral degree may not propose a dissertation (PSYC 8850 Dissertation) until admitted to candidacy.

A five-member doctoral committee will be formed by the student and his/her advisor. Three members of the doctoral committee must be full-time equivalent faculty members of the Department of Psychology, including at least one clinical and one experimental faculty member. The fourth and fifth members must meet Graduate School requirements and include the Graduate Faculty Representative. Students will present findings and implications of the dissertation to departmental faculty, students, and community members at an open forum.

Clinical - Professional Development

All students must complete 7 credits of PSYC 7725 Psychology Clinic Practicum and 1 credit of PSYC 5517 Interdisciplinary Evaluation Team. Up to 3 credits of PSYC 7724 Community Practicum may be substituted for credits of PSYC 7725. All students must perform 5 disability evaluations at the ISU Psychology Clinic and complete at least 3-credits of PSYC 7727 (Psycho-educational evaluation). Progress in the development of professional skills is evaluated by faculty supervisors and the Clinical Training Committee. Satisfactory evaluations of professional development by the Clinical Training Committee is a degree requirement.

All students must satisfactorily complete a one-year full-time clinical internship at a site belonging to the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers or comparable supervised clinical practice approved by the Clinical Training Committee. Concurrent enrollment at Idaho State University in 1 credit of PSYC 7749 Clinical Internship is required. Students enrolled in PSYC 7749 will be considered full-time Idaho State University students. Application to clinical internships and acceptance into clinical internships requires completion of the dissertation prospectus and the approval of the Clinical Training Committee.

Doctor of Philosophy in Experimental Psychology

Admission Requirements

Admission requirements are as stated for the Master of Science in Psychology with the following additions: all students must be recommended by the Experimental Admissions Committee of the Psychology Department.

General Requirements

All doctoral students must complete the Master of Science in Psychology, or its equivalent. Students entering the doctoral training program at Idaho State University with a master’s degree from another institution will receive full or partial credit, based on an examination of completed course work and research. The department chair, the director of experimental training, and the department subject matter expert(s) will review all relevant documents and determine the course work and research, if any, that will be required to compensate for omissions and/or non-equivalency. The following requirements are all in addition to the Master of Science requirements.

Required Courses
PSYC 6637Multivariate Statistics and Research Design3
Select one or both of the following for a total of 10 credits:10
Special Problems
Special Problems
Research
PSYC 8850Dissertation12
Electives 118
Total Hours (36 from the M.S. degree + 31 additional credits)67
 
1

Students must complete 18 credits of elective classes. Up to nine credits of these electives may be taken outside the Psychology Department. Electives should be approved by the student’s faculty advisor. The 12 elective credits earned for the Master of Science degree will satisfy course requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy degree, subject to approval of the Department Chair.

Scholarship - Research Development

Upon completion of Area Requirements plus PSYC 6627 Statistics and Research Design I and PSYC 6632 Statistics and Research Design II, and the thesis prospectus, doctoral students are required to pass a Qualifying Exam to be admitted to doctoral candidacy. The exam samples each student’s integrative writing skills and conceptual abilities. Students write independently on integrative topics from across the foundational areas of general psychology or from an individualized and focused area of scholarly research.

Students may be admitted to candidacy for the doctoral degree upon satisfactory completion of the Master of Science degree (or its equivalent) and the Qualifying Exam. Candidates for the doctoral degree may not propose a dissertation (PSYC 8850) until admitted to candidacy.

A five-member doctoral committee will be formed by the student and his/her advisor. Three members of the doctoral committee must be full-time equivalent faculty members of the Department of Psychology, including at least one clinical and one experimental faculty member. The fourth and fifth members must meet Graduate School requirements and include the Graduate Faculty Representative. Students will present findings and implications of the dissertation to departmental faculty, students, and community members at an open forum.

Master of Science in Psychology

Admission Requirements

  1. In addition to the general requirements of the Graduate School, the applicant must have: minimum entrance requirements include a 3.0 grade point average during the last two years of undergraduate study. Graduate Record Exam scores of the 50th percentile or higher are preferred on two of the three aptitude tests (verbal, quantitative, or analytical writing).
  2. An undergraduate major in psychology or the equivalent.
  3. Recommendation by the Experimental or Clinical Admissions Committee of the Department of Psychology. The Clinical and Experimental Admissions Committees only admit students into the combined Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy course of study.

General Requirements

Area requirements assume the satisfactory completion of undergraduate courses that prepare the student for advanced study. Specifically, students must have completed undergraduate courses in research methods, neuroscience, sensation, perception, learning, social psychology, developmental psychology, personality, history and systems, or the equivalent of these topic areas. Each student’s records will be reviewed by the departmental chair in consultation with departmental staff. Students deficient in area prerequisites may be required to enroll in additional course work and/or experience limitation of choices. An Area Requirement Plan of Completion must be finalized during the student’s first semester following matriculation. The department chair, the student, and one or more faculty appointed by the chair will meet and approve each student’s Plan of Completion. Students admitted by the Clinical Admissions Committee must complete the Clinical Area Requirements; students admitted by the Experimental Admissions Committee must complete the Experimental Area Requirements.

Required Courses
PSYC 6627Statistics and Research Design I3
PSYC 6632Statistics and Research Design II3
PSYC 6650Thesis6
Select either Clinical or Experimental Area:12
Clinical Area Requirements
Complete one, 3-credit course from each of the following core areas:
Area A: Biological Bases of Behavior
Sensation and Perception
Behavioral Neuroscience I
Behavioral Neuroscience II
Area B: Cognitive-Affective Bases of Behavior
Cognitive Psychology
Area C: Social Bases of Behavior
Advanced Social Psychology
Area D: Individual Behavior
Advanced Developmental Psychology
Advanced Personality
OR
Experimental Area Requirements
Core Area (Select four of the following):
Behavioral Neuroscience I
Advanced Topics in Learning
Cognitive Psychology
Advanced Social Psychology
Advanced Developmental Psychology
Advanced Personality
Electives
Students must also complete 12 credits of elective classes. Up to six credits may be taken outside the Psychology Department. Electives should be approved by the faculty advisor.12
Total Hours36
 

How to Read Course Descriptions

Courses

PSYC 5501 Theories of Personality: 3 semester hours.

Study of the main theories of personality from both historical and contemporary perspectives, including trait theory, biological, psychoanalytic, humanistic, cross-cultural, behavioral, and social learning. Emphasis will be given to applying theories with the goal of understanding personality and predicting behavior. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

PSYC 5502 Teaching of Psychology: 1-2 semester hours.

Prepare students to teach independently. Pedagogy, use of technology, and problem solving skills related to teaching psychology courses will be discussed. Supervised teaching will be treated as a separate module. Repeatable up to 4 credits. Graded S/U.

PSYC 5504 Sensation and Perception: 4 semester hours.

The anatomical and physiological basis of sensation will be reviewed. Moreover, traditional and contemporary theories of perception will be critically considered. Students will be expected to do laboratory work illustrating basic concepts of sensory and perceptual function. PREREQ: PSYC 4431 or PSYC 4446.

PSYC 5508 Science Pseudoscience and Psychology: 3 semester hours.

Designed to teach scientific thinking and how to critically evaluate fringe-science, paranormal, and other unproven claims. The psychological processes underlying pseudo-scientific thinking and beliefs also are introduced.

PSYC 5512 Ethical and Professional Issues in Psychology: 2 semester hours.

An introduction to ethical and professional standards in the field of psychology including a historic and contemporary framework. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

PSYC 5517 Interdisciplinary Evaluation Team: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to the principles and techniques associated with interdisciplinary evaluation. Disciplines emphasized: Audiology, Nursing, Physical Therapy, Psychology, Social Work, Special Education, Speech-Language Pathology. Equivalent to CSD 5517, DHS 5517, NURS 5517, and SOWK 5517.

PSYC 5531 Behavioral Neuroscience I: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to behavioral neuroscience with an emphasis on the relation between the central nervous system and behavior. Topics include: basic neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, hormones, sensory systems, motor systems, learning, memory, homeostatic regulation, and evolution. Specific, evaluted graduate-level activities and/or performances are identfied in the course syllabus.

PSYC 5532 Behavioral Neuroscience II: 3 semester hours.

Critical evaluation of contemporary research in behavioral neuroscience. Emphasizes current research and theories concerning neural mechanisms of behavior. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: PSYC 5531 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 5535 Animal Behavior: 3 semester hours.

Study of experiments in animal learning that have thrown light upon the problem of understanding human learning. Course is concerned with both observation and experimental studies of habit formation, conditioning, related endocrinology, and nerve structure as they are associated with behavior capabilities. PREREQ: Six hours of psychology beyond PSYCH 1101.

PSYC 5545 Learning and Behavior: 3 semester hours.

Survey of the major principles of learning, including the processes underlying operant and classical conditioning. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

PSYC 5563 Clinical Psychology and the Law: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the field of forensic psychology by exposing students to the primary areas in which clinical psychology relates to the legal system. Emphasis will be on expert testimony by clinicians in matters of criminal responsibility, mental competency, civil commitment, and child custody. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 5565 Behavioral Medicine: 3 semester hours.

Psychological issues of health, disease states, and prevention. Critical evaluation of clinical research and practice including nontraditional healing techniques and current models used to understand health and disease.

PSYC 5567 Topics in Psychology: 1-6 semester hours.

Selected topics in psychology. Contents vary. May be repeated with different content and departmental approval for a total of 6 credits.

PSYC 5570 Advanced Topics in Learning: 3 semester hours.

In-depth study of the major theories, principles, and research in learning. Areas of emphasis include the experimental analysis of behavior, stimulus control, schedules of reinforcement, aversive control, and the quantitative analysis of behavior. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus. PREREQ: PSYC 4445 or 5545 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 5583 Special Problems: 1-3 semester hours.

Research or readings in a special area of interest to be arranged on an individual basis with individual faculty. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 credits. PREREQ: Permission of Instructor.

PSYC 5597 Professional Education Development Topics: 1-3 semester hours.

A course for practicing professionals aimed at the development and improvement of skills. May not be applied to graduate degrees. May be repeated. May be graded S/U.

PSYC 5599 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

This is an experimental course. The course title and number of credits are noted by course section and announced in the class schedule by the scheduling department. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times. May be repeated.

PSYC 6620 Psychodiagnostics I: 3 semester hours.

Theory, measurement development, and current use and limitations of major tests of intelligence, academic achievement, development, and neurological function. Practice in test administration is included.

PSYC 6621 Psychodiagnostics II: 3 semester hours.

Theory, measurement development, and current use and limitations of major tests of personality, both objective and projective, with an emphasis on classification decisions. Practice in test administration is included.

PSYC 6623 Advanced Psychological Measurements: 3 semester hours.

Psychological measurement theory, the mathematical basis of reliability and validity constructs, and test construction strategies are introduced. Measurement principles are then generalized across response modes and methods, focusing on direct observation technologies.

PSYC 6627 Statistics and Research Design I: 3 semester hours.

Critical review of the theory and the methods used to evaluate the outcome of empirical research in the life and social sciences. Chi square, correlation, regression, analysis of variance designs are considered and related to the theoretical distributions basic to statistical inference. PREREQ: Psychology Graduate Student.

PSYC 6632 Statistics and Research Design II: 3 semester hours.

Basic assumptions in the philosophy of scientific investigation, principles of design and analysis of experiments, including tests of significance and factorial designs, and reporting of research, in which the student is required to prepare reports of his/her own work as if for publication. PREREQ: Psychology Graduate Student.

PSYC 6634 Cultural Diversity and Individual Differences: 3 semester hours.

Critical evaluation of scholarship on and social representations of cultural diversity and individual differences. Review of current theory, research, assessment, and intervention practices with diverse populations.

PSYC 6636 Neuropsychological Assessment: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the selection, administration, scoring, and interpretation of commonly used neuropsychological tests, including tests of conceptual, perceptual, and linguistic ability. PREREQ: PSYC 6620 and PSYC 6621.

PSYC 6637 Multivariate Statistics and Research Design: 3 semester hours.

Continuation of research principles in design and analysis, emphasizing the use of multiple dependent variables, strategies for investigating latent variables, and testing complex causal models.

PSYC 6641 Special Problems: 1-3 semester hours.

The individual works under faculty guidance. The student will pursue original research in some area of psychology of particular interest to him or her and write a report of his or her work in a form suitable for publication. Repeatable up to 12 credits. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 6642 Cognitive Psychology: 3 semester hours.

Examines cognitive processes underlying perception, attention, mental imagery, memory, language, and problem solving/decision making. Cognitive development and individual differences are discussed. Both theory and experimental findings are emphasized in each area.

PSYC 6643 Advanced Social Psychology: 3 semester hours.

Review of current research and major theories of social psychology. Areas of emphasis include attitude, persuasion, prejudice and stereotyping, attraction, aggression, helping, and social cognition.

PSYC 6644 Advanced Developmental Psychology: 3 semester hours.

Study of developmental theories, issues, and research across the lifespan. Emphasis is on current empirical research, highlighting the interaction of biological, cognitive, and social domains of development within and between individuals.

PSYC 6645 Adult Psychopathology and Treatment I: 3 semester hours.

Exposure to fundamental issues in etiology and assessment of adult psychopathology, including advancements in diagnostic classification, focusing on Axis I disorders such as anxiety and mood disorders. Empirically supported treatment methods are emphasized.

PSYC 6646 Adult Psychopathology and Treatment II: 3 semester hours.

Continued review of theories and forms of adult psychopathology, diagnostic categories, and models of treatment. Empirically supported treatment models that consider the therapeutic process, therapeutic relationship, and sociocultural context are emphasized. PREREQ: PSYCH 6645 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 6647 Advanced Personality: 3 semester hours.

This course will explore contemporary personality theory, as well as significant areas and trends in the current empirical literature.

PSYC 6649 Child Psychopathology and Treatment: 3 semester hours.

Review of the psychopathology, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of major psychological disorders of childhood, including mental retardation, autism, learning disability, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder.

PSYC 6650 Thesis: 1-6 semester hours.

Thesis. May be repeated. Graded S/U.

PSYC 6672 History and Systems: 3 semester hours.

Survey of historical and philosophical bases of theories of psychology presently used. Emphasis on understanding impact of political, cultural, and historical forces on ideas and methods used in psychology. PREREQ: Passage of qualifying examination.

PSYC 6699 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

This is an experimental course. The course title and number of credits are noted by course section and announced in the class schedule by the scheduling department. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times. May be repeated.

PSYC 7701 Clinical Psychology: 2 semester hours.

Orientation to professional training, evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment. Orientation to the ISU Psychology Clinic procedures and report writing requirements. Introduction to clinical interviewing, crisis management, supervision, and consultation.

PSYC 7702 Introduction to Psychotropic Medication: 2 semester hours.

Introduction to clinical psychopharmacology meeting American Psychological Association guidelines for Level 1 predoctoral training. Disorders of substance abuse, psychosis, mood, anxiety, and development are highlighted. PREREQ: PSYC 5532.

PSYC 7703 Advanced Ethics and Professional Issues: 1 semester hour.

Systematic review of ethical decision-making emphasizing analysis of complex ethical issues. Professional topics include supervision, post-doctoral training, licensure, management of high-risk patients, self-care, and emerging models of behavioral health consultation. PREREQ: PSYC 5512.

PSYC 7724 Community Practicum: 1-2 semester hours.

Students work in public or private mental health agencies under qualified supervisors. Professional activities include evaluation and therapy. Six hours per week per credit. May be repeated. PREREQ: Approval of Clinical Training Committee.

PSYC 7725 Psychology Clinic Practicum: 1-2 semester hours.

Students are supervised in the evaluation and treatment of clients served by the Psychology Department Clinic. Six hours per week per credit. May be repeated. PREREQ: Approval of Clinical Trianing Committee.

PSYC 7726 Supervision Practicum: 1-2 semester hours.

Guided supervisory experiences with junior colleagues in the ISU Psychology Clinic. Graded S/U. May be repeated. PREREQ: Approval of Clinical Training Committee.

PSYC 7727 Psycho-Educational Evaluations: 1 semester hour.

Interviewing, test selection, test administration, case conceptualization, report writing, and interpretation skills are performed under supervision. May be repeated. PREREQ: Approval of Clinical Training Committee.

PSYC 7736 Clinical Proseminar: 1-3 semester hours.

Specific areas of psychopathology, assessment, diagnosis, intervention, and/or associated theoretical models are reviewed in a seminar format with subject matter experts. May be repeated with different content.

PSYC 7748 Clinical Externship: 1 semester hour.

Clinical practice in regional human service agency. Minimum 10 hours per week; 1 hour supervision by Ph.D. psychologist per 20 contact hours. Repeatable up to 12 credits. Graded S/U. PREREQ: Approval of Clinical Training Committee.

PSYC 7749 Clinical Internship: 1 semester hour.

Predoctoral internship, 11-12 months, at a member site of the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers, or comparable supervised clinical practice approved by the Clinical Training Committee. Repeatable up to 3 credits. Graded S/ U. PREREQ: Approval of Clinical Training Committee.

PSYC 8850 Dissertation: 1-12 semester hours.

Research, analysis, and writing of a doctoral dissertation. Variable credits. Graded S/U. May be repeated. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.

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