Homeland Security and Emergency Management (HSEM)

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Courses

HSEM 1105 Introduction to Homeland Security and Emergency Management: 3 semester hours.

This course provides an introduction to homeland security and emergency management including theories, principles, and approaches. Students study the foundations of homeland security and gain knowledge and skills for managing emergencies in order to lessen their impacts on society. Students explore the definition of homeland security, the stakeholders and current issues, consequence management and crisis decision-making, and explore emerging threats under the national security umbrella. Students discuss the philosophy of comprehensive emergency management, including mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. D

HSEM 1125 Leadership and Influence: 3 semester hours.

Students will determine how to assess differences in personal values and interpersonal influence styles, and to apply situational behaviors in homeland security and emergency management. Students explore contemporary models of leadership, develop a personal philosophy of leadership, and test their philosophy against practical experiences. The course provides a forum where students identify and consider their own character, personal values, and workplace ethics. Topics include leadership and influence, character traits and values, conflict management, use of power, ethical leadership, and group dynamics. D

HSEM 1130 Roots of Terrorism: 3 semester hours.

This course studies a combination of factors that support terrorism, including former terrorist groups and terror leaders who evolve into legitimate political parties. It addresses the social aspects of terrorism, and how terrorism can influence the political spectrum and domestic policy. Exploring the social and political roots of terrorism, students will learn the relationship between war and terrorism, the use of terror as a communication tool, and will examine the outcomes of terrorism. D

HSEM 1160 Emergency Resource Management: 3 semester hours.

Students will explore resource management as part of the Emergency Support Functions to include nontraditional stakeholders with specialized expertise, within the overall framework of an Emergency Operations Center. Performance is based on learning activities applicable to the field of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. D

HSEM 2210 Homeland Security Emergency Management Exercise Design: 3 semester hours.

Develop and conduct disaster exercises to test a community's Emergency Operations Plan and operational response capability to include natural disasters, intentional attacks, and hazardous materials incidents. Emphasis on design, implementation, and evaluation of exercises with the goal of developing, implementing, and managing a comprehensive disaster exercise program. PRE-OR-COREQ: HSEM 1105. D

HSEM 2260 Emergency Preparedness and Planning: 3 semester hours.

This course explores the roles, duties, and responsibilities of emergency managers at the local, state, federal, and private levels with an emphasis on the preparedness phase of emergency management. Students will explore key components of emergency response plans and gain hands-on experience in plan development. Students will study preparedness from the macro to the micro level exploring the topic from the national to the individual levels. D

HSEM 2264 Building Resilient Communities and Mitigation: 3 semester hours.

Students investigate ways to reduce losses from future disasters, emergencies, hazardous materials and other events caused by natural and man made hazards. This course explores the principles and practices of hazard mitigation at the local level through federal levels of governance, emphasizing the importance of avoiding or preventing future and recurring losses. Resilient communities are those that have taken appropriate actions to minimize the impact of a catastrophic occurrence. Historical examples show that life is never the same after a disaster, but communities that survive and thrive are those that have resiliency. This course will step students through the emergency management planning cycle (mitigate, prepare, respond, recover) to illustrate how to foster community resiliency. PRE-OR-COREQ: HSEM 1105. D

HSEM 2270 Disaster Operations & Response: 3 semester hours.

Students will examine the terminology, players, and management philosophy of the federal Incident Management System (ICS) and interrelationship with Emergency Operations Centers. This course explores the principles that promote effective disaster response operations and management. Students will analyze the nature of disasters and hazardous materials in the context of response operations in the United States, and the roles and responsibilities of various homeland security and emergency management related actors. PRE-OR-COREQ: HSEM 1105. D

HSEM 2296 Independent Study: 1-8 semester hours.

Addresses specific learning needs of individuals for the enhancement of knowledge and skills within the program area under the guidance of an instructor. D

HSEM 2298 Special Topics: 1-6 semester hours.

Addresses the specific needs of industry, enabling students to upgrade technical skills that are not included in the current program curriculum. D

HSEM 3301 Homeland Security and Emergency Management Overview: 3 semester hours.

This course provides an overview to homeland security and emergency management. Students study the foundations of homeland security and this course provides insights to anyone with an interest in public safety and disaster management. Students explore the definition of homeland security, the stakeholders and current issues, consequence management and crisis decision-making, and explore emerging threats under the national security umbrella. Students will examine policy directives, terrorism threats, crisis decision-making, critical infrastructure, cyber security, and forecasting to develop future capabilities by applying academic scrutiny to this emerging discipline. D

HSEM 3310 Integrated Systems and Interface: 3 semester hours.

Students will explore the interconnectivity and interdependence of local, state and federal homeland security and emergency management programs. Students will gain an understanding of how organizational theory applies to emergency management, the broader homeland security mission, and cooperation between various local, state and federal agencies as well as with the private sector and non-governmental organizations. D

HSEM 3315 Risk Analysis and Asset Protection: 3 semester hours.

Risk assessment is a key element of asset protection and maintaining essential services for the American public. This course gives students the opportunity to study and analyze risk. Students use different methodologies and conduct risk assessments. Students learn how to process data and leverage the findings to mitigate, prepare and respond to disasters. Once a risk picture exists, security leaders can decide what to protect and analyze the impact of loss of a particular critical infrastructure asset or system. D

HSEM 3320 Emerging Technology in Homeland Security Emergency Management: 3 semester hours.

Government agencies in today?s fast-paced Information Age are more dependent than ever on technology to ensure a common operating picture and effective information sharing among partners. This course provides students a broad overview of homeland security technologies, information systems, surveillance technology, communications systems, and emerging and disruptive technologies. Students will examine the maturity of technologies along the adoption spectrum and develop and apply requirements for influencing future capabilities. This course focuses on technology as a tool to support homeland security and emergency management personnel regardless of functional specialty. D

HSEM 3330 Psychology of Terrorism and Disasters: 3 semester hours.

This course emphasizes the study of the psychology of terrorism and review the conditions that foster terrorist suicide. Students will explore the psychological and social impacts of terrorism and how its use fits into the political spectrum of existing and emerging countries. Students will also examine the concepts of disaster mythology pattern, public resistance and response to disaster warnings, disaster stress and denial, crisis decision making, and community change. D

HSEM 3335 Cyber Security: 3 semester hours.

Students will study security in the virtual world and learn about the threat, as well as policy issues that thrust cyber activity into the criminal realm, the realm of international conflict, and the rules of war. Students will conduct a threat analysis of different threats, theft of intellectual property, interdependencies and the consequences of attacks, and infrastructure disruption. Students will develop an understanding of the importance and impact of securing cyberspace at the personal, corporate, and governmental levels. Upon developing a sufficient understanding, students will engage decision-making and reporting strategies in the case of a cyber breach. D

HSEM 3360 Crisis Management and Leadership: 3 semester hours.

Students discuss the leadership and decision-making issues and challenges related to preparing for and responding to a catastrophic incident. Students examine proven strategies and practices and apply smart practices from past disasters. This course explores the characteristics of crisis and decision-making styles and the role of leadership styles in this relationship. The course provides a forum where students identify and consider their own character, personal values, and workplace ethics. Students will examine how leadership fits into, shapes, or changes an organization's culture. D

HSEM 3365 International Disasters and Humanitarian Aid: 3 semester hours.

Students will explore the issues pertinent to international disasters and the complexities of coordinating the unmet needs and immense anxiety of disaster survivors, including the susceptibility of under-developed countries. Students will study the structure and goals of volunteer organizations providing humanitarian aid and spontaneous digital technology communities, active across the world. This course also examines the actors and interface between natural borders and international humanitarian aid efforts and federal coordinating agencies. D

HSEM 3398 Special Topics: 1-6 semester hours.

Addresses the specific needs of industry, enabling students to upgrade technical skills that are not included in the current program curriculum. D

HSEM 3399 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the class schedule. D

HSEM 4410 Policies, Civil Rights and Administration: 3 semester hours.

Students will examine the American political system, civil rights issues, and ideologies that influence morals, government roles and policies to keep order. The American population fosters an array of opinions and attitudes about homeland security, laws designed to protect lives, government policies and statutes, and conflicts impacting civil rights and liberties. Students will analyze and engage in discourse to explore the overlap and dichotomies between the policy decisions of government officials and civilian values and morals. D

HSEM 4415 Strategic Planning & Budgeting: 3 semester hours.

Local and state agencies, nonprofit organizations, and private sector business need to be strategic and manage fiscal resources effectively. Strategic planning and budgeting efforts are essential to develop sound public safety programs, projects, and initiatives to ensure accountability of public funds. National security and emergency management efforts flow from strategic plans that drive and guide federal grant allocations to states and local jurisdictions. Students will develop and evaluate strategic plans, go through budget reduction exercises, develop project management plans, and write a grant investment justification. D

HSEM 4425 Business Continuity and Critical Infrastructures: 3 semester hours.

Students will examine the roles and responsibilities of nontraditional participants in the homeland security and emergency management enterprise. Businesses and critical infrastructure provide essential services supporting the health and welfare of the public on a daily basis and required by emergency responders to mitigate, prepare, respond, and recover from disasters. Students will examine Emergency Support Functions provided by the private sector and develop recovery time objectives for critical infrastructure owners and operators to ensure business continuity and restoration of essential services to the community. D

HSEM 4450 Threat of Radicalism: 3 semester hours.

This course explores how segments of a society become radicalized and the role of religion and politics in shaping worldwide threats and conflicts present in the world today. Students will explore the misuse and radicalization of religion for the support of political agendas. This course examines the ideologies of Sunni and Shia perspectives and includes a deeper view of how mainstream beliefs play into the international landscape. Students will analyze how extreme viewpoints and centralized or decentralized groups do or do not shape the homeland security environment. PRE-OR-COREQ: HSEM 1105 or HSEM 3301. D

HSEM 4454 Intelligence and Terrorism: 3 semester hours.

This course examines emerging terrorist threats to the U.S. and strategies to disrupt terrorist plots. Students will explore the life cycle of terrorist organizations and the role of counterintelligence. Quality Intelligence provides the homeland security and emergency management leader on any level with a timely analysis of relevant information. Students will develop an understanding of intelligence tradecraft and the analytic and research skills used in intelligence work and the legal and ethical conduct expected and required in gathering intelligence. Students will understand how intelligence can be used to disrupt terror plots and optimize the homeland security effort. PRE-OR-COREQ: HSEM 1105 or HSEM 3301. D

HSEM 4464 Disaster Response and Recovery: 3 semester hours.

This course explores the evolving threats and drivers propelling the need to continually expand and improve our response capabilities. Students examine the effectiveness of disaster response and the efficacy of how emergencies are managed through an examination of case studies and the application of social science research. This course examines the rising costs of managing disasters, and strategies to improve surge capacity and sustainability in a challenging budget environment. Rather than an introduction to emergency management tools and techniques, a major focus of this course is leveraging innovation and futuristic thinking to employ alternate, community-focused strategies to build resiliency. PRE-OR-COREQ: HSEM 1105 or HSEM 3301. D

HSEM 4470 Public Health Emergencies: 3 semester hours.

Students will learn the requirements of a public health workforce and how they integrate into emergency support functions and lead agencies within a public health crisis. Students will learn how to prepare and respond to a wide range of public health disasters. Topics include pandemic program planning, public health crises management, disaster management, timely access to information, clear knowledge of individual and agency rules and responsibilities, reliable communication systems, integrating volunteers, and exercising plans. D

HSEM 4475 Social Vulnerability Approach: 3 semester hours.

This course analyzes the impact of appropriate, affirmative actions to minimize the impact of a catastrophic occurrence to the whole community. Students in this course will step through the development of vulnerability analysis, technological and human-induced causes, structural and situational barriers to disaster resilience, community vulnerability and strategies for new ideas and implementation of social change in disasters. Students will examine theoretical approaches to disaster research, theory of disaster response, and community sociological impact of disasters. D

HSEM 4490 Internship: 1-3 semester hours.

This course enables Homeland Security and Emergency Management students to explore different career paths while they are engaged in this field of study. Students who locate an organization offering an internship related to homeland security and emergency management, will apply their acquired knowledge to real world organizations? goals, objectives and missions. Students will refine their skill sets and build their portfolios with examples of their work, helping to prepare them during future job search activities. Students must secure their own internships with an organization and upon receiving approval from the HSEM director, they will be assigned a faculty advisor for support. PRE-OR-COREQ: HSEM 1105 or HSEM 3301. PREREQ: Permission of the instructor. D

HSEM 4491 Internship: 1-3 semester hours.

This course enables Homeland Security and Emergency Management students to explore different career paths while they are engaged in this field of study. Students who locate an organization offering an internship related to homeland security and emergency management, will apply their acquired knowledge to real world organizations? goals, objectives and missions. Students will refine their skill sets and build their portfolios with examples of their work, helping to prepare them during future job search activities. Students must secure their own internships with an organization and upon receiving approval from the HSEM director, they will be assigned a faculty advisor for support. PRE-OR-COREQ: HSEM 1105 or HSEM 3301. PREREQ: Permission of the instructor. D

HSEM 4494 Practicum: 6 semester hours.

The practicum is the culmination of the learning process where theory is put into practice. Students identify an organization and a project sponsor that has a problem that needs to be solved. Students use analysis, project management, and strategic planning skills to develop and present a robust proposal on how to solve problems and support the organization by implementing projects that support the proposal recommendations. Projects might include the creation of a hazard identification and vulnerability assessment, or developing a policy, procedure, or plan. Project proposals are based on the student?s problem definition and analysis, developing solution criteria and making recommendations to the sponsor organization. Students work with a faculty advisor and their project sponsor throughout the 16-week term to provide analyzed research results that meet the needs of the partner organization. PRE-OR-COREQ: HSEM 4415 Strategic Planning and Budgeting. D

HSEM 4496 Independent Study: 1-8 semester hours.

Addresses specific learning needs of individuals for the enhancement of knowledge and skills within the program area under the guidance of an instructor. D

HSEM 4498 Special Topics: 1-3 semester hours.

Addresses the special needs of industry, enabling students to upgrade technical skills that are not included in the current program curriculum. D

HSEM 4499 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

The content of this course is not described in the catalog. Title and number of credits are announced in the Class Schedule.