Department of Sport Science and Physical Education

Department of Sport Science and Physical Education

The mission of the Department of Sport Science and Physical Education at Idaho State University is to provide candidates with the intellectual and physical skills necessary to maximize their potential. The study of the physical education discipline is an important part of the curriculum at Idaho State University; it strives to fulfill the university mission as well as the College of Education’s mission in the enhancement of learning, lifelong development, and educational leadership. The study of physical education encourages candidates to respect human dignity, to be critical thinkers, and to be effective communicators. It provides an opportunity for the individual to make decisions regarding lifestyle and health choices enhancing self-direction and self-esteem. Physical education develops both the mental and physical discipline to provide opportunities for mental, social, emotional, spiritual, and personal development while interacting in a university environment.

The Idaho State University Department of Sport Science and Physical Education is committed to providing an academic program in which men and women can discover, experience, and reflect upon the study of movement. Curricula are designed to challenge candidates in the theory and to provide opportunity for practical experiences. Candidates are expected to become both advocates for and contributors to the discipline on personal and professional levels. Faculty members are committed to excellence in teaching, concerns for the needs of candidates, service to the community, and expertise in their discipline.

Majors in Physical Education receive preparation for a number of careers. The candidate majoring in Physical Education may select from four emphasis areas including exercise science, outdoor education, sport management, and teaching. Majors receive preparation for graduate work in areas such as physical education, physical therapy, exercise science, outdoor education, and athletic administration.

The Department of Sport Science and Physical Education also offers three minor areas of study to facilitate professional and career development needed by women and men to succeed in a changing world. Candidates may choose to minor in coaching, outdoor education, or sport management.

The Department of Sport Science and Physical Education is committed to make the sport and leisure activity program for the major and non-major an experience serving the needs and interests of participants. The activity program is designed to develop participants’ skills in lifetime activities and to increase participants’ fitness level.

The Department of Sport Science and Physical Education also offers two Masters degree programs. The Master of Physical Education degree with an emphasis in Athletic Administration is designed to facilitate the intellectual and practical knowledge necessary to enter the field of sport management or administration upon graduation. The Master of Science in Athletic Training develops competent athletic training students who qualify to sit for the Board of Certification examination.

Admission to Program

Admission to a major in physical education or any of the minors available in the department should be done as early as possible during the candidate’s career. Admission to the PE major is dependent upon completion of PE 2223 with a grade of C (2.0) or better, and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5.

  1. Completion of the General Education Objectives 1 through 6.
  2. Overall GPA of 2.5.
  3. GPA of 2.7 in Professional Physical Education courses.
  4. No grades below “C” (2.0) in Professional Physical Education courses completed.
  5. Candidate portfolio initiation (PE 2223)
  6. A student must meet with an advisor to verify eligibility for admission to the Sport Science and Physical Education Department.

Candidates must make formal application for full admission to the Sport Science and Physical Education program. Application forms are available in the department office. Candidates may not register without advisor’s approval for upper division courses until admittance to the program is achieved.

Denial of Admission to the Sport Science and Physical Education Major Program

Candidates who have been denied full admission to the Sport Science and Physical Education program may reapply; however, they must meet the standards for admission at the time of their reapplication to attain full admission.

Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in Physical Education

Physical Education Standards

The Physical Education Learning Goals are aligned with 2 sets of standards: The Idaho State University College of Education Core Standards (described previously), and the Content Standards in Physical Education of the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE).

Graduation Requirements

In order to graduate from the Sport Science and Physical Education Program as a major, the candidate must achieve the following in addition to completing the course requirements :1

  1. Minimum grade of “C” (2.0) in professional courses.
  2. Minimum overall cumulative GPA of 2.7.
  3. Minimum GPA of 3.00 in the major.
  4. Completion of candidate portfolio, with review by advisor.
  5. Exit interview with advisor.
  6. Current Red Cross First Aid and CPR Card
1

Transfer candidates and change of major/minor candidates will be allowed to enroll in 6 credits of upper division courses while completing admission requirements.

Physical Education Core (12 credits)

Physical Education majors in all emphasis areas must complete a common core. The core consists of the following courses:

PE 2222First Aid CPR and Sport Safety3
PE 2223Foundations of Physical Education and Sport3
PE 2243Anatomical Foundations of Human Activity3
PE 4454Senior Capstone3

Physical Education Emphasis Areas:

     Exercise Science
     Physical Education Teaching
    
Outdoor Education
    
Sport Management

Exercise Science Emphasis (77 credits, plus Core)

Objective #1: To develop foundational knowledge in the basic sciences (42 credits)

(Note: PE 2243 requirement in SSPE Core is satisfied by BIOL 3301, BIOL 3302, and labs.)

Biological Cognate: 11 credits

BIOL 3301
3301L
Anatomy and Physiology
and Anatomy and Physiology Lab
4
BIOL 3302
3302L
Anatomy and Physiology
and Anatomy and Physiology Lab
4
BIOL 4453Foundations in Neuroscience3

Chemistry Cognate: 9 credits

CHEM 1111
1111L
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry I Lab
5
CHEM 1112
1112L
General Chemistry II
and General Chemistry II Lab
4

Physics Cognate: 8 credits

PHYS 1111
PHYS 1113
General Physics
and General Physics I Laboratory
4
PHYS 1112
PHYS 1114
General Physics II
and General Physics II Laboratory
4

Math Cognate: 11 credits

MATH 1143College Algebra 13
MATH 1144Trigonometry 12
MATH 1153Introduction to Statistics3
MATH 1160Applied Calculus3
(each of the TWO courses above satisfies General Education Objective 3)
1

MATH 1147 Precalculus (5 cr) will substitute for MATH 1143 and MATH 1144.

Psychology Cognate: 3 credits

PSYC 1101Introduction to General Psychology (partially satisfies General Education Ovjective 6)3

Objective #2: To develop specialized knowledge in human movement activities (14 credits)

PE 3300Movement Theory and Motor Development3
PE 3301
3301L
Physiology of Exercise
and Physiology of Exercise Laboratory
4
PE 3302
3302L
Biomechanics
and Biomechanics Laboratory
4
PE 3322Introduction to Sport Psychology3

Objective #3: To develop skills assessing and analyzing human movement activities (12 credits)

PE 3370Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries3
PE 4482Mechanical Analysis of Human Movement3
PE 4484Exercise Assessment and Prescription3
PE 4490Practicum in Physical Education3

 Objective #4: To develop knowledge and skills in cognate exercise disciplines (9 credits)

NTD 2239Nutrition3
Electives, chosen with advisor approval6
Recommended Electives:
Introductory Microbiology
and Introductory Microbiology Laboratory
General Microbiology
and General Microbiology Lab
Neuroscience
Organic Chemistry I
Medical Terminology and Communication
Fitness and Wellness Programs
Sports Nutrition
Personal Trainer Certification
Adapted Physical Activity
Drugs in Society
Child Development
Abnormal Psychology I

Physical Education Teaching Emphasis (K-12 certification) - 41 credits (not including the Professional Education Core and the Physical Education Core Components)

Candidates who have completed the required physical education teaching emphasis courses must also obtain K-12 Teacher Certification in Physical Education by completing all requirements in the Teacher Education Program.

Candidates completing the Physical Education Teaching Emphasis are not required to take the PE 4454 Senior Capstone core course.

In addition to completing departmental major requirements, candidates must make formal application and complete an interview for admission to the Teacher Education Program. See all requirements in the Teacher Education section of the College of Education portion of the catalog.

The Physical Education Learning Goals are aligned with 2 sets of standards: The Idaho State University College of Education Core Standards and the Content Standards in Physical Education of the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE).

NASPE Content Standards in Physical Education

The NASPE Standards identify seven areas that include the following.

The candidate completing this program:

  1. Demonstrates competency in many movement forms and proficiency in a few movement forms;
  2. Applies movement concepts and principles to the learning and development of motor skills;
  3. Exhibits a physically active lifestyle;
  4. Achieves and maintains a health-enhancing level of physical fitness;
  5. Demonstrates responsible personal and social behavior in physical activity settings;
  6. Demonstrates understanding and respect for differences among people in physical activity settings; and
  7. Understands that physical activity provides opportunities for enjoyment, challenge, self-expression, and social interaction.

Physical Education Core Component: 9 credits

PE 2222First Aid CPR and Sport Safety3
PE 2223Foundations of Physical Education and Sport3
PE 2243Anatomical Foundations of Human Activity3

Objective #1: To develop teaching skills in a variety of areas in physical activities, athletics, and creative movement (20 credits)

Skills Component: 10 credits

PE 2235Activity Performance Techniques I3
PE 2236Activity Performance Techniques II3
PE 2237Activity Performance Techniques III3
One (1) aquatics course1

Methods Component: 10 credits

PE 2281Practical Outdoor Skills1
PE 3357Methods of Teaching Elementary Physical Education3
PE 3370Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries3
PE 4437Methods of Teaching Secondary Physical Education3

Objective #2: To acquire knowledge in the basic foundations of human activity (12 credits)

PE 3300Movement Theory and Motor Development3
PE 3303Kinesiology for Teachers and Coaches3
PE 3322Introduction to Sport Psychology3
PE 4494Adapted Physical Activity3

Objective #3: To understand and develop skills required for teaching physical education (9 credits)

PE 3362Tests and Measurements in Physical Education3
PE 3364Introduction to Sport Law3
PE 4475Organization and Administration of Physical Education3

Objective #4: To understand and develop general pedagogical skills and teacher effectiveness

Professional Education Core Courses

Refer to the College of Education Teacher Education Admission standards and Elementary and/or Secondary Education Core in this catalog.

Outdoor Education Emphasis -- 41 credits, plus Core

Physical Education Core Component (included in PE Core): 9 credits

Note: First Aid (PE 2222 ) core requirements are satisfied by PE 2285, Wilderness First Aid, or PE 4441, Wilderness First Responder, included below.

Leadership and Teaching Component (10 credits)

PE 3386Outdoor Leadership3
PE 4440Survey of Outdoor Education Literature3
PE 4445Methods of Teaching Outdoor Activities and Practicum (4 credits required for majors)3-4

Outdoor Education Safety Component (8 credits)

Any of the following may be selected, but Outdoor Risk Management and Liability, Leave No Trace Trainer, and first aid certification (Wilderness First Aid, Wilderness First Responder or Emergency Medical Technician) are required.

PE 2271Winter Survival Skills1
PE 2272Wilderness Survival Skills1
PE 2282Map Compass and Backcountry Navigation1
PE 2283Leave No Trace Trainer1
PE 2285Wilderness First Aid1
PE 2286Avalanche and Winter Sports Safety1
PE 3381River Safety and Swiftwater Rescue1
PE 3383Advanced Rock Climbing and Climbing Safety2
PE 3384Outdoor Risk Management and Liability3
PE 4441Wilderness First Responder Certification3

Candidates who at the time of graduation possess a current certificate in Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) or Wilderness First Responder may apply three (3) credits to this component.

Natural History OR Business Component - Students may select either one or the other of the following two options:

Option A: Natural History Component (minimum of 9 credits)

(Courses in this Option are waived for majors or minors in geology, biology, botany, zoology, or ecology.)

BIOL 1101
1101L
Biology I
and Biology I Lab
4
BIOL 1102
1102L
Biology II
and Biology II Lab
4
BIOL 2209
2209L
General Ecology
and General Ecology Laboratory
4
BIOL 2213Fall Flora2
BIOL 2214Spring Flora2
BIOL 3337Conservation Biology3
BIOL 4426
4426L
Herpetology
and Herpetology Lab
4
BIOL 4427
4427L
Ichthyology
and Ichthyology Lab
4
BIOL 4438Ornithology4
BIOL 4441
4441L
Mammalogy
and Mammalogy Lab
4
BIOL 4489Field Ecology4
GEOL 1100The Dynamic Earth3
GEOL 1100LThe Dynamic Earth Lab1
GEOL 1101Physical Geology3
GEOL 1101LPhysical Geology Lab1
GEOL 1110Physical Geology for Scientists Laboratory1
GEOL 2210Earth in Space and Time3
GEOL 4456Geology of Idaho2
GEOL 4491Seminar1
PHYS 1152Descriptive Astronomy3
PHYS 1153Descriptive Astronomy Laboratory1

Option B: Outdoor Business Component (9 credits)

(Courses in this Option are waived for business related majors or minors.)

BA 1110The World of Business3
MKTG 2225Basic Marketing Management3
ACCT 3303Accounting Concepts3

Experiential Skills Component (Minimum of 8 credits)

Courses selected must be different from those used to fulfill the requirements of the Outdoor Education Safety Component. (Note: Only eight (8) PEAC credits can be counted towards graduation requirement.)

PEAC 1101Adaptive Snow Skiing1
PEAC 1108Instructor Training of Adapted Snowskiing1
PEAC 1163Backpacking1
PEAC 1165Backcountry GPS Navigation1
PEAC 1166Canoeing1
PEAC 1167Kayak Touring1
PEAC 1175ABeginning Kayaking1
PEAC 1176ABeginning Rock Climbing1
PEAC 1177ABeginning Cross-Country Skiing1
PEAC 1178ABeginning Telemark Cross-Country Skiing1
PEAC 1178BIntermediate Telemark Cross-Country Skiing1
PEAC 1181Mountain Biking1
PEAC 1182CAdvanced Dutch Oven Cooking1
PEAC 1185Basic Mountaineering1
PEAC 1186BIntermediate Fly Fishing1
PEAC 1189Beginning Gym Climbing1
PEAC 1191BIntermediate Horsemanship1
PEAC 1194Caving Workshop1
PE 2200Team Building Leadership2
PE 2271Winter Survival Skills1
PE 2272Wilderness Survival Skills1
PE 2280Winter Camping and Backcountry Travel1
PE 2281Practical Outdoor Skills1
PE 2282Map Compass and Backcountry Navigation1
PE 2284Intermediate Kayaking and Whitewater Safety1
PE 2286Avalanche and Winter Sports Safety1
PE 2287Snowboard Instructor Training1
PE 2288Ski Instructor Training1
PE 3381River Safety and Swiftwater Rescue1
PE 3383Advanced Rock Climbing and Climbing Safety2
PE 4491Physical Education Workshop 11-3
1

When workshop relates to outdoor education, i.e., Canoe Workshop (1 credit), Whitewater Rafting Workshop (1 credit), Backpacking Workshop (1 credit), Advanced Kayaking-Summer Field Experience (1 credit), Beginning Rock Climbing-Summer Field Experience (1 credit), Advanced Rock Climbing-Summer Field Experience (1 credit).

Electives (minimum of 6 credits)

Courses may include those listed in the Natural History Component, and/or Business Component, and/or the following: (Other courses may be approved by the advisor.)

CMP 2201Business and Professional Communication3
CMP 2202Photo, Graphic, and Video Editing3
CMP 2241Introduction to Public Relations3
CMP 2251Introduction to Photography3
CMP 3308Groups and Communication3
CMP 3339Web Design3
ENGL 2206Creative Writing Workshop3
ENGL 3307Professional and Technical Writing3
ENGL 3308Business Communications3
HIST 4432U.S. Environmental History3
MGT 3312Individual and Organizational Behavior3
MGT 4441Organization Behavior3
PE 3322Introduction to Sport Psychology3
PE 3364Introduction to Sport Law3
PE 3366Sport Marketing3
PE 4493Introduction to Sport Sociology3
POLS 4455Environmental Politics and Policy3
POLS 4457Grantwriting3

Sport Management Emphasis -- 43 credits, plus Core

Objective #1: To understand and appreciate the physical education and sport setting (13 credits)

Criteria for courses: Courses that fulfill this objective (a) introduce the concepts of sport and motor development, and (b) explore administrative duties in the athletic setting.

Select TWO of the following:6
Activity Performance Techniques I
Activity Performance Techniques II
Activity Performance Techniques III
Additional Coursework (7 credits):
PE 2281Practical Outdoor Skills1
PE 3322Introduction to Sport Psychology3
Approved Electives3
Possible Elective Choices:
PE 3300Movement Theory and Motor Development3
PE 3301
3301L
Physiology of Exercise
and Physiology of Exercise Laboratory
4
PE 3302
3302L
Biomechanics
and Biomechanics Laboratory
4
PE 3303Kinesiology for Teachers and Coaches3
PE 3357Methods of Teaching Elementary Physical Education3
PE 3362Tests and Measurements in Physical Education3
PE 3370Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries3
PE 4437Methods of Teaching Secondary Physical Education3
PE 4493Introduction to Sport Sociology3
PE 4494Adapted Physical Activity3

Objective #2: To develop leadership and management skills (12 credits)

Criteria for courses: Courses that fulfill this objective (a) introduce the concepts of leadership in the sport setting, and (b) explore administrative duties in the athletic setting.

PE 3364Introduction to Sport Law3
PE 4473Facilities Planning and Design3
PE 4475Organization and Administration of Physical Education3
Approved Electives3
Possible Elective Choices:
PE 3386Outdoor Leadership3
POLS 4458Public Administration Ethics3
CMP 2201Business and Professional Communication3
CMP 3308Groups and Communication3
CMP 3309Communication Inquiry3
CMP 3320Foundations of Leadership3
CMP 4422Conflict Management3
CMP 4424Management Communication3

Objective #3: To understand and interpret the business setting (15 credits)

Criteria for courses: Courses that fulfill this objective (a) provide a business perspective of the understanding of the management setting; (b) provide understanding of human resource management; and (c) provide understanding of legal implications in running a business.

ACCT 3303Accounting Concepts3
MGT 3312Individual and Organizational Behavior3
MGT 4473Human Resource Management3
or MGT 4441 Organization Behavior
PE 3366Sport Marketing3
Approved Electives3
Possible Elective Choices:
ACCT 2201Principles of Accounting I3
ACCT 2202Principles of Accounting II3
CMP 2241Introduction to Public Relations3
ECON 2201Principles of Macroeconomics3
ECON 2202Principles of Microeconomics3
FIN 3315Corporate Financial Management3
MGT 2216Business Statistics3
MGT 2217Advanced Business Statistics3
MGT 2261Legal Environment of Organizations3
MGT 4441Organization Behavior3
MKTG 2225Basic Marketing Management3
MKTG 4427Consumer Behavior3
POLS 4409Community Planning3
POLS 4441Administrative Law3
POLS 4442Constitutional Law3
POLS 4443Civil Rights and Liberties3
POLS 4451Public Organizational Theory3
POLS 4452Budgeting and Finance3
POLS 4454Public Workplace Issues3
POLS 4456Labor Organization3
POLS 4457Grantwriting3

Objective #4: To obtain practical experience in the field of sport management (3 credits)

Criteria for courses: Candidates will engage in a pre-approved 45-hour sports management internship.

Three (3) credits required.

PE 4490Practicum in Physical Education3

Minor in Coaching

The Coaching minor is modeled from the NASPE National Standards for Athletic Coaches which are intended to provide direction for administrators, coaches, athletes and the public regarding the skills and knowledge that coaches should possess. There are a total of 37 standards organized in 8 domains. The domains include: Injury Prevention, Care and Management; Risk Management; Growth, Development and Learning; Training, Conditioning and Nutrition; Social-Psychological Aspects of Coaching; Skills, Tactics and Strategies; Teaching and Administration; and Professional Preparation and Development.

To be eligible for the Coaching minor, candidates must complete 19 credits—12 credits of required courses and 7 credits of elective courses.

Required Courses (12 credits):

PE 3303Kinesiology for Teachers and Coaches3
PE 3322Introduction to Sport Psychology3
PE 3370Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries3
PE 4480Coaching Problems3

Elective Courses (7 credits total):

Select four (4) credits:4
Practical Applications of Coaching Baseball and Softball
Practical Applications of Coaching Basketball
Practical Applications of Coaching Football
Practical Applications of Coaching Soccer
Practical Applications of Coaching Tennis
Practical Applications of Coaching Track and Field
Practical Applications of Coaching Volleyball
Practical Applications of Coaching Wrestling
Select three (3) credits:3
Movement Theory and Motor Development
Organization and Administration of Physical Education
Introduction to Sport Sociology

Minor in Outdoor Education

Candidates seeking a minor in outdoor education must complete a total of 22 credits from the following four components:

Leadership and Teaching Component (9 credits):

PE 3386Outdoor Leadership3
PE 4440Survey of Outdoor Education Literature3
PE 4445Methods of Teaching Outdoor Activities and Practicum (Only 3 credits required for minors)3

Outdoor Education Safety Component (5 credits):

Required Course

PE 2283Leave No Trace Trainer1

Electives

Choose a minimum of four (4) additional credits from the following list. One of the courses (and no more than one course) must be wilderness first aid-related.

PE 2271Winter Survival Skills1
PE 2272Wilderness Survival Skills1
PE 2282Map Compass and Backcountry Navigation1
PE 2285Wilderness First Aid1
PE 2286Avalanche and Winter Sports Safety1
PE 3381River Safety and Swiftwater Rescue1
PE 3383Advanced Rock Climbing and Climbing Safety2
PE 4441Wilderness First Responder Certification3

Candidates who at the time of graduation possess a current certificate in Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) or Wilderness First Responder may apply three (3) credits to this component.

Natural History OR Outdoor Business Component  - Students may select either one or the other of the following two options:

Option A: Natural History Component (minimum of 3 credits)

Courses in this Option are waived for majors or minors in geology, biology, botany, zoology or ecology.)

BIOL 1101
1101L
Biology I
and Biology I Lab
4
BIOL 1102
1102L
Biology II
and Biology II Lab
4
BIOL 2209General Ecology4
BIOL 2213Fall Flora2
BIOL 2214Spring Flora2
BIOL 3337Conservation Biology3
BIOL 4426
4426L
Herpetology
and Herpetology Lab
4
BIOL 4427
4427L
Ichthyology
and Ichthyology Lab
4
BIOL 4438Ornithology4
BIOL 4441
4441L
Mammalogy
and Mammalogy Lab
4
BIOL 4489Field Ecology4
GEOL 1100The Dynamic Earth3
GEOL 1100LThe Dynamic Earth Lab1
GEOL 1101Physical Geology3
GEOL 1101LPhysical Geology Lab1
GEOL 1110Physical Geology for Scientists Laboratory1
GEOL 2210Earth in Space and Time3
GEOL 4456Geology of Idaho2
GEOL 4491Seminar1
PHYS 1152Descriptive Astronomy3
PHYS 1153Descriptive Astronomy Laboratory1

Option B: Outdoor Business Component (3 credits)

(Courses in this option are waived for business related majors or minors.)

BA 1110The World of Business3
MKTG 2225Basic Marketing Management3
ACCT 3303Accounting Concepts3

Experiential Skills Component

Minimum of five (5) credits required. Courses selected must be different from those used to fulfill the requirements of the Outdoor Education Safety Component.

PE 2200Team Building Leadership2
PE 2271Winter Survival Skills1
PE 2272Wilderness Survival Skills1
PE 2280Winter Camping and Backcountry Travel1
PE 2281Practical Outdoor Skills1
PE 2282Map Compass and Backcountry Navigation1
PE 2284Intermediate Kayaking and Whitewater Safety1
PE 2286Avalanche and Winter Sports Safety1
PE 2287Snowboard Instructor Training1
PE 2288Ski Instructor Training1
PE 3381River Safety and Swiftwater Rescue1
PE 3383Advanced Rock Climbing and Climbing Safety2
PE 4491Physical Education Workshop 11-3
PEAC 1101Adaptive Snow Skiing1
PEAC 1108Instructor Training of Adapted Snowskiing1
PEAC 1163Backpacking1
PEAC 1165Backcountry GPS Navigation1
PEAC 1166Canoeing1
PEAC 1167Kayak Touring1
PEAC 1175ABeginning Kayaking1
PEAC 1176ABeginning Rock Climbing1
PEAC 1177ABeginning Cross-Country Skiing1
PEAC 1178ABeginning Telemark Cross-Country Skiing1
PEAC 1178BIntermediate Telemark Cross-Country Skiing1
PEAC 1181Mountain Biking1
PEAC 1182CAdvanced Dutch Oven Cooking1
PEAC 1185Basic Mountaineering1
PEAC 1186BIntermediate Fly Fishing1
PEAC 1189Beginning Gym Climbing1
PEAC 1191BIntermediate Horsemanship1
PEAC 1194Caving Workshop1
1

When workshop relates to outdoor education, i.e., Canoe Workshop (1 cr), Whitewater Rafting ­Workshop (1 cr), Backpacking Workshop (1 cr), Advanced ­Kayaking-Summer Field Experience (1 cr), Beginning Rock Climbing-Summer Field Experience (1 cr), ­Advanced Rock Climbing-Summer Field Experience (1 cr).

Minor in Sport Management

Sport Management Standards

The Sport Management Minor is modeled to frame the NASPE-NASSM Content Standards for undergraduate Sport Management programs. The standards encompass 10 core areas that include: Behavioral Dimensions of Sport; Management and Organizational Skills; Ethics in Sport Management; Marketing in Sport; Communication in Sport; Finance in Sport; Economics in Sport; Legal Aspects of Sport; Governance in Sport; and Field Experience in a Sport Setting.

Candidates completing this minor must complete a total of 27 credits, including 21 credits of required courses and 6 approved elective credits from the courses listed below. No more than 32 credit hours of College of Business courses may be counted toward the minor in Sport Management. In addition, the candidate must show satisfactory completion of the ASEP Citizenship Through Sports Course.

Required Courses (21 credits):

MGT 3312Individual and Organizational Behavior3
MGT 4473Human Resource Management3
PE 3322Introduction to Sport Psychology3
PE 3364Introduction to Sport Law3
PE 3366Sport Marketing3
PE 4473Facilities Planning and Design3
PE 4490Practicum in Physical Education3

Sport Management Elective Courses (6 credits):

ECON 2201Principles of Macroeconomics3
ECON 2202Principles of Microeconomics3
FIN 3315Corporate Financial Management3
MGT 2216Business Statistics3
MKTG 2225Basic Marketing Management3
MKTG 4427Consumer Behavior3
PE 4465Organization and Administration of Intramural Sports3
PE 4475Organization and Administration of Physical Education3
PE 4491Physical Education Workshop 11-3
PE 4493Introduction to Sport Sociology3
1

When workshop relates to Sport Management.

How to Read Course Descriptions

Physical Educ Activity Courses

PEAC 1100 Adaptive Martial Arts: 1 semester hour.

Adaptive and corrective exercise programs in the martial arts (including judo and tae kwondo) designed for individuals unable to participate in a regular activity class. F, S

PEAC 1101 Adaptive Snow Skiing: 1 semester hour.

Adaptive and corrective exercise program in snowskiing designed for individuals unable to participate in a regular activity class. S

PEAC 1102 Adaptive Waterskiing: 1 semester hour.

Adaptive and corrective exercise program in waterskiing designed for individuals unable to participate in a regular activity class. Su

PEAC 1103 Adaptive Swimming: 1 semester hour.

Adaptive and corrective exercise programs in aquatics designed for individuals unable to participate in a regular activity class. Su

PEAC 1104 Adaptive Weight Training: 1 semester hour.

Adaptive and corrective exercise programs in progressive body building and conditioning exercises designed for individuals unable to participate in a regular activity class. F, S

PEAC 1105 Seated Aerobics: 1 semester hour.

Adaptive and corrective exercise programs designed to improve cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and strength. D

PEAC 1107 Instructor Training of Adapted Waterskiing: 1 semester hour.

Methods and techniques of teaching waterskiing to people with disabilities. Su

PEAC 1108 Instructor Training of Adapted Snowskiing: 1 semester hour.

Methods and techniques of teaching snowskiing to people with disabilities. S

PEAC 1109 Instructor Training of Adapted Sport: 1 semester hour.

Methods and techniques of teaching a variety of sport skills to people with disabilities. F, S

PEAC 1110 Military Style Physical Fitness Civilian Only: 1 semester hour.

Participate in and learn to lead a physical fitness program. Emphasis on developing an individual fitness program and the role of exercise and fitness in one's life. Equivalent to MSL 1110. F, S

PEAC 1120 Introduction to Pilates Equipment: 1 semester hour.

Introduction of the Pilates-based methods of equipment exercise and how to safely perform some of the basic fundamental movements with the equipment. F, S

PEAC 1121A Beginning Pilates Matwork: 1 semester hour.

Provides an introduction to this form of exercise and direction on how to perform some of the basic fundamental movements performed on the floor. F, S

PEAC 1121B Intermediate Pilates Matwork: 1 semester hour.

Build upon basic skills learned in beginning matwork course. More advanced floor Pilates skills in building understanding of technique and how technique relates to Pilates apparatus. PREREQ: PEAC 1121A or permission of instructor. D

PEAC 1122A Beginning Yoga: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to Yoga practice; building and developing strength, balance, flexibility and an appreciation for controlled movement. F, S

PEAC 1122B Intermediate Yoga: 1 semester hour.

Course builds upon basic skills learned in beginning yoga. More advanced skills in building and developing strength, balance, flexibility and an appreciation for controlled movement. F, S

PEAC 1122D Yoga Sports Conditioning: 1 semester hour.

Yoga practice; building and developing strength, balance, flexibility and an appreciation for controlled movement with an emphasis based upon the considerable strength and flexibility in the legs, hips and ankles that are required in sport participation. Physiological self assessments and safety will be covered. F, S

PEAC 1124 Triathlon Training: 1 semester hour.

Participants will work on their swimming, biking, and running skills as well as learn the rules and valuable tips for completing triathlons successfully. Physiological self assessments and safety will be covered. F, S

PEAC 1125 Fitness Trend: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to specific activity in the fitness field. F, S, Su

PEAC 1126 Self Defense: 1 semester hour.

Applications of self-defense within the framework of mixed martial arts. F, S, Su

PEAC 1127 Wrestling: 1 semester hour.

For wrestlers with any experience level, focusing on bringing wrestlers to the highest level of wrestling technique, strategy and training. The wrestlers will learn to wrestle through smart drilling techniques, specialized live wrestling drills and matches. Wrestling technique learned will be folkstyle wrestling. F, S

PEAC 1128 Shorin Ryu Karate: 1 semester hour.

Shorin Ryu karate is taught in the traditional Japanese style. The course will explore the movements of the style and how these movements relate to self-defense through the study of Kata (forms). The course will emphasize the building of character, self-discipline, humility, as well as a respect for self and others. F, S

PEAC 1129 Shoshin Ryu: 1 semester hour.

Classical martial arts system that blends the most current teaching practices with effective, centuries-old methods of instruction in order to teach students effective self-defense techniques. F, S

PEAC 1130 Aquacise: 1 semester hour.

Techniques of water exercises for physical conditioning. Physiological self-assessments and water safety will be covered. F, S

PEAC 1131D Aerobics Toning and Conditioning: 1 semester hour.

Elementary techniques and modalities of aerobic exercise with an emphasis on toning exercises and cardiovascular conditioning. Includes physiological self assessments and safety. F, S

PEAC 1131E Aerobics Boot Camp: 1 semester hour.

Elementary techniques and modalities of aerobic exercise incorporating a full body workout that works all major muscle groups with boot camp style drills such as push-ups, jumping jacks, and abdominal exercises. Includes physiological self-assessments and safety. F, S

PEAC 1131F Aerobics Core Fitball: 1 semester hour.

An aerobic style workout that incorporates a balance ball to perform exercises, designed to increase the participant's core strength and stability, flexibility, range of motion, balance, and coordination. Includes physiological self assessments and safety. F, S

PEAC 1131G Aerobics Kickboxing: 1 semester hour.

An aerobic style workout which combines elements of boxing, martial arts, and aerobics to provide overall physical conditioning and toning. Includes physiological self assessments and safety. F, S

PEAC 1131H Aerobics Zumba: 1 semester hour.

An aerobic style workout that is a fusion of Latin and International music that creates a dynamic, effective fitness system. The routines feature interval training sessions where fast and slow rhythms and resistance training are combined to tone and sculpt your body while burning fat. Includes physiological self assessments and safety. F, S

PEAC 1131J Aerobics Nutrition and Weight Management: 1 semester hour.

This aerobic/fitness class is designed to introduce students to a wide variety of cardiovascular training modalities, develop a fitness plan, and aid students in gaining the necessary skills to select the foods that promote health and develop a weight management plan. Includes physiological assessments, body composition testing, and safety. F, S

PEAC 1131K Aerobics Turbokick: 1 semester hour.

Intense kickboxing moves and dance moves choreographed to high energy music, providing a cardiovascular challenge that blends intense intervals strength/endurance training and cool-down. Includes physiological self assessments and safety. F, S

PEAC 1131M Aerobics Cardio Jam: 1 semester hour.

This course is designed to help students improve their physical fitness through--but is not limited to--kickboxing, yoga, pilates, and other forms of cardiovascular and muscle toning exercises. Includes physiological self assessments and safety. F, S

PEAC 1131N Aerobics Cardio Hip Hop: 1 semester hour.

A cardiovascular workout that includes the latest hip hop dance moves and routines. Basic moves are built upon to make this class available to everyone from the non-dancer to advanced skill level. Includes physiological self assessments and safety. F, S

PEAC 1131P Interval Training: 1 semester hour.

Interval Cross Training is a class designed to combine the advantages of interval training and the benefits of cross training exercises. Develop proper technique and safety involved in Interval Cross Training, as well as proper posture and alignment for stronger, healthier body. Increase cardiovascular health, muscular strength and endurance, increase flexibility and improve body composition. F, S, Su

PEAC 1132 Individualized Physical Education: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to lifetime fitness programming components with individually-designed programs. Physiological self-assessments, safety, and equipment are covered. F, S

PEAC 1132A Spinning: 1 semester hour.

Fitness class using spinning/stationary bicycles. Develop cardiovascular endurance (aerobic and anaerobic) and muscular strength and endurance. Music is used as a tool to motivate and inspire, as well as establish the pace, rhythm and energy level of the class. F, S, Su

PEAC 1133 Jogging and Personal Fitness: 1 semester hour.

Fitness-oriented course, designed for students who wish to maintain or increase their present fitness level. Physiological self-assessments and safety are covered. F, S

PEAC 1134A Beginning Weight Training: 1 semester hour.

Instruction and participation in fundamentals of progressive body-building and conditioning with resistance, including various modalities. Physiological self-assessments and safety will be covered. F, S, Su

PEAC 1134B Intermediate Weight Training: 1 semester hour.

Instruction and participation in fundamentals of progressive body-building and conditioning with resistance, including various modalities. Designed for the intermediate lifter. F, S

PEAC 1135A Introduction to Hatha Yoga: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to yoga philosophy, beginning postures, and techniques of breathing, relaxation, and meditation. Progressive method builds strength, flexibility, and balance, and is adaptable to all ability levels. Special emphasis on proper alignment and diaphragmatic breathing. F, S

PEAC 1135B Intermediate Hatha Yoga: 1 semester hour.

Course builds upon basic skills learned in introductory course, including addition of more challenging postures, advanced breathing and relaxation techniques, while continuing to build flexibility, strength and balance. More attention given to yoga philosophy and meditation. PREREQ: PEAC 1135A or permission of Instructor. D

PEAC 1136 Target Fit TM Conditioning: 1 semester hour.

Targit Fit (TM) system used for over 115 different weight room type exercises while learning resistance training. Resistance training options allow students to improve muscular strength, overall cardiovascular endurance and flexibility while improving bone density. F, S

PEAC 1137 Marathon Training: 1 semester hour.

Physical, mental and spiritual training principles for beginning runners training to complete marathons. D

PEAC 1138 Kendo: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to principles and philosophies of Kendo, including training hall etiquette, basic sword handling, combat stances, footwork and striking a target. D

PEAC 1139A Beginning Fencing: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to the basic skills of foil fencing including equipment, grip, salute, on-guard, advance, retreat, lunge, and defense. Includes safety concerns, basic strategies, and rules. F, S

PEAC 1139B Intermediate Fencing: 1 semester hour.

Continuation and expansion of the basic skills included in the beginning course with the addition of parries, engagements, and advanced attacks. Also includes advanced strategies. F, S

PEAC 1140A Beginning Billiards: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to the fundamental skills involved in billiards: technique, game play, scoring, and etiquette. F, S

PEAC 1140B Intermediate Billiards: 1 semester hour.

Designed for the intermediate level player; this course explores a variety of more advanced shots and strategies. F, S

PEAC 1141A Fundamentals of Bowling: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to fundamental skills, scorekeeping, handicaps, and rules of bowling. F, S

PEAC 1141B Intermediate Bowling: 1 semester hour.

Designed for the intermediate level bowler, this course builds upon the skills and knowledge of the fundamentals course. F, S

PEAC 1141C Advanced Team Bowling: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to more advanced individual techniques and skill assessment and corrections for bowling. F, S

PEAC 1142A Beginning Golf: 1 semester hour.

Fundamental philosophies and techniques of golf, including grip, use of irons, woods, and putter, and etiquette. F, S, Su

PEAC 1142B Intermediate Golf: 1 semester hour.

Designed for the intermediate golfer, this course builds on the acquisition of skill in the fundamental strokes; etiquette; and more advanced reading of the course. F, S. Su

PEAC 1143A Judo: 1 semester hour.

Principles and philosophies of judo, including the techniques of grappling, throwing, and falling. Varying practice methods. Open to all skill levels. F, S

PEAC 1143B Intermediate Judo: 1 semester hour.

A continuation of fundamental judo skills and philosophies for intermediate-skilled students, including basics of some advanced skills. F, S

PEAC 1143C Advanced Judo: 1 semester hour.

A refinement of fundamental judo skills and philosophies for advanced-skilled students, including advanced techniques of throwing, grappling, and falling. F, S

PEAC 1143D Self Defense Judo: 1 semester hour.

Applications of self-defense within the framework of Judo. Open to all skills levels. F, S

PEAC 1144 Tae Kwon Do: 1 semester hour.

Presentation of principles and philosophies of Tae Kwondo, a Korean form of karate meant for energy conservation in self-defense technique. F, S

PEAC 1145 Rodeo: 1 semester hour.

An orientation to the safety and techniques of the various events of the modern-day rodeo. F, S

PEAC 1146 Archery: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to equipment, technique, and safety practices of archery. D

PEAC 1146B Archery-Bowhunter Education: 1 semester hour.

Technique, strategy, safety and equipment in the sport of Bowhunter Archery. Bowhunter Education Certification optional at course end. F, S

PEAC 1146C Hunters Education Certification: 1 semester hour.

Idaho Fish and Game-approved course to teach hunters to become: Safe, responsible, knowledgeable and involved in hunting and conservation organizations. Hunter Education Certification optional at course end. F, S, Su

PEAC 1147A Beginning Karate: 1 semester hour.

Principles and philosophies of a modified Shorin Ryu Karate Do directed towards beginning martial artists. F, S

PEAC 1148A Beginning Womens Judo: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to methods and techniques of judo for women. Includes a variety of holding and throwing techniques. Rules, safety considerations, and the philosophy of judo are emphasized. D

PEAC 1149A Tai Chi: 1 semester hour.

This course is designed to facilitate fitness through the practice in the Yang-style short form of Tai Chi Chuan. D

PEAC 1149B Intermediate Tai Chi: 1 semester hour.

This course is designed to further skill competency and fitness through practice in the Yang-style short form of Tai Chi Chuan. PREREQ: PEAC 1149A or equivalent skill and ability. D

PEAC 1150A Beginning Racquetball: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to fundamentals of technique, strategy, and safety in the game of racquetball. F, S

PEAC 1150B Intermediate Racquetball: 1 semester hour.

Continuation of basic skills and fundamental strategies for the intermediate level racquetball player. F, S

PEAC 1150C Advanced Racquetball: 1 semester hour.

Refinement of skills, techniques, and strategies for the advanced level racquetball player. D

PEAC 1151A Beginning Tennis: 1 semester hour.

Rudimentary principles and techniques of tennis, including basic shot selection, conditioning, drill works, and game play. F, S, Su

PEAC 1151B Intermediate Tennis: 1 semester hour.

A continuation of fundamental tennis skills and principles for intermediate-skilled students, including an introduction to some advanced skills. F, S

PEAC 1151C Advanced Tennis: 1 semester hour.

Refinement of skills, techniques, and strategies for the advanced level player. D

PEAC 1152A Beginning Badminton: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to basic skills, game play, and strategies in the game of badminton. D

PEAC 1152B Intermediate Badminton: 1 semester hour.

Continuation of skill refinement, more advanced game play, and strategies for the intermediate player. D

PEAC 1152C Advanced Badminton: 1 semester hour.

Refinement of fundamental skills, more advanced game play, and strategies for the advanced player. D

PEAC 1153 Racquet Sports: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to and instruction in fundamental skills for a variety of court sports, specifically tennis, racquetball and badminton. D

PEAC 1154 Table Tennis: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to the basic fundamentals of the game of table tennis. Includes fundamental individual and doubles techniques, strategies, and play. D

PEAC 1155A Beginning Soccer: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to basic individual and team soccer skills, including dribbling, shooting, and offensive and defensive techniques and strategies. S

PEAC 1155B Intermediate Soccer: 1 semester hour.

Continuation of fundamental team and individual skill acquisition, and introduction of more advanced techniques and strategies. D

PEAC 1156A Beginning Basketball: 1 semester hour.

Fundamental individual and team techniques, strategies, and play. F, S

PEAC 1156B Intermediate Basketball: 1 semester hour.

More advanced individual and team techniques, strategies and play for intermediate level players. F, S

PEAC 1157A Beginning Volleyball: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to fundamental individual and team skills, strategies, and play for beginning level volleyball players. S

PEAC 1157B Intermediate Volleyball: 1 semester hour.

More advanced individual and team skills, strategies, and play for intermediate level volley ball players. S

PEAC 1158 Softball: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to fundamental skills, and refinement of more advanced skills, for individual and team techniques, strategies, and play in softball. F, S

PEAC 1159 Ultimate Frisbee: 1 semester hour.

This course is designed to enhance student skills and abilities in ultimate frisbee. D

PEAC 1160A Beginning Skiing: 1 semester hour.

Fundamental techniques, etiquette, training, safety practices and skill practice in downhill skiing for beginners. S

PEAC 1160B Intermediate Skiing: 1 semester hour.

For intermediate level skiers, an emphasis on safety practices, etiquette, more advanced techniques, training, and skill practice. S

PEAC 1160C Advanced Skiing: 1 semester hour.

Intended for advanced skiers, this course emphasizes high-level skill acquisition, training, safety, ski etiquette, and skill practice. S

PEAC 1161A Beginning Night Skiing: 1 semester hour.

Skill acquisition and safety practices for beginners who wish to ski at night. S

PEAC 1162A Beginning Snowboarding: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to snowboarding, including selection of equipment, safety practices, etiquette, and techniques. S

PEAC 1162B Intermediate Snowboarding: 1 semester hour.

Designed for the experienced snowboarder. A continuation of the basic skills and techniques included in the beginning course. S

PEAC 1162C Advanced Snowboarding: 1 semester hour.

Designed for the advanced snowboarder. A continuation of the intermediate skills and techniques included in the intermediate course. F, S

PEAC 1163 Backpacking: 1 semester hour.

Designed for the beginning to advanced backpacker, this course prepares the students for and includes a week long backpacking trip. Includes discussions on navigation, equipment, low impact techniques and food preparation. F, S

PEAC 1164A Beginning Ice Skating: 1 semester hour.

The ice skating course is designed for full participation on ice. Proper techniques are taught for various levels of figure and hockey skaters. S

PEAC 1165 Backcountry GPS Navigation: 1 semester hour.

The practical use of portable GPS devices for outdoor applications. Topics covered include angular and rectangular coordinates, cross-country land navigation, use of waypoint coordinates, determining distance, and limitations of GPS. F

PEAC 1166 Canoeing: 1 semester hour.

A basic level course, teaching both American Red Cross and Native American canoeing styles, and covering paddling techniques, canoe design, equipment, clothing, camping, safety and rescue. Su

PEAC 1167 Kayak Touring: 1 semester hour.

Basic skills for lake, ocean and flat-water kayaking including equipment, technique, navigation, safety and rescue. F

PEAC 1168 Day Hiking: 1 semester hour.

Skills necessary to be successful in outdoor hiking situations. Learn to plan, prepare and execute a day hiking adventure by focusing on equipment, skills and physical preparation. D

PEAC 1169 Touch Rugby: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to the participation in the fundamental techniques, strategies, training systems and safety of touch rugby. D

PEAC 1170A Beginning Swimming: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to propulsive movement skills in the water; includes safety, front crawl, and elementary backstroke. F, S

PEAC 1170B Intermediate Swimming: 1 semester hour.

Refinement of beginning skills; includes an introduction to breaststroke, intermediate level safety, basic diving technique, back crawl, and sidestroke. F, S

PEAC 1170C Advanced Swimming: 1 semester hour.

Refinement of previous strokes; includes introduction to butterfly, inverted breaststroke, the trudgen, and overarm sidestroke. D

PEAC 1171 Synchronized Swimming: 1 semester hour.

An orientation to the fundamentals of the Olympic sport of individual and team synchronized swimming, including tricks, presentation, and basic to advanced skills. D

PEAC 1172 SCUBA Diving: 1 semester hour.

Basic skills in SCUBA diving: mask, fins, snorkel use; safety techniques; mechanical equipment use; aquatic environments. Students must: swim 400 yards; tread water 15 minutes; carry ten pound brick 25 yards. No certification. F, S

PEAC 1173 Skin and SCUBA Diving Certification: 2 semester hours.

Skills in SCUBA: mask, fins, and snorkel use; safety techniques; mechanical equipment use; aquatic environments. Candidates must: swim 400 yards; tread water 15 minutes; carry ten pound brick 25 yards. Certification possible. F, S, Su

PEAC 1174 Advanced Open Water SCUBA Diving: 2 semester hours.

Course builds upon basic skills learned in beginning scuba diving. Student must have open water certification. Teaches the four specialties of photography, equipment, navigation and search/recovery. Requires eight dives during two open water diving days. Candidate will receive certification after completion of course requirements. PREREQ: Open water certification. D

PEAC 1175A Beginning Kayaking: 1 semester hour.

Uses controlled environment of ISU pool and includes basic skills including draw and sculling strokes, high and low bracing, eddy turns, deep water rescue techniques, river safety, and Eskimo roll. F, S

PEAC 1176A Beginning Rock Climbing: 1 semester hour.

Designed for students with little or no climbing experience, this outdoor class covers basic climbing including knot tying, belaying, movement techniques, top rope anchor systems, and safety procedures. F, S

PEAC 1176B Intermediate Rock Climbing: 1 semester hour.

Designed for the intermediate level student, this course explores more advanced techniques, etiquette, and minimal impact techniques. F, S

PEAC 1177A Beginning Cross-Country Skiing: 1 semester hour.

Designed for beginning skiers, this course introduces students to flat surface techniques and progresses to uphill and downhill techniques. Indoor lectures are combined with tours to local cross-country ski areas. S

PEAC 1177B Intermediate Cross-Country Skiing: 1 semester hour.

Designed for intermediate skill x-country skiers, this course builds on the fundamental techniques of the beginning course. Includes safety in the backcountry, more advanced uphill and downhill techniques, and overnight trip planning. S

PEAC 1178A Beginning Telemark Cross-Country Skiing: 1 semester hour.

Fundamental skills of executing downhill turns on cross-country skis. Telemark is primary emphasis, but wedge, stem christie, and parallel turns are also covered in relation to free heel skis. S

PEAC 1178B Intermediate Telemark Cross-Country Skiing: 1 semester hour.

Course builds upon the basic skills first introduced in the beginning course. Introduces additional techniques. S

PEAC 1179 Diver Stress and Rescue: 2 semester hours.

Introduction to fundamentals and techniques to understand diver stress, reasons for occurrence, methods of detection, methods of prevention, methods of treatment at occurrence. Candidate will receive certification after completion of course requirements. D

PEAC 1180A Beginning Windsurfing: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to the basic skills of sailboarding including sail rigging, sailing maneuvers, wind reading and windsurfing safety. F, S

PEAC 1180B Intermediate Windsurfing: 1 semester hour.

Continuation of basic skills of sailboarding, with additional emphasis on more advanced technique and weather reading for the intermediate level windsurfer. F, S

PEAC 1181 Mountain Biking: 1 semester hour.

Includes both mountain and road biking. Combines a series of indoor lectures with practical outdoor riding experience. Topics include riding techniques, clothing, equipment, safety and bike maintenance. F

PEAC 1182A Beginning Dutch Oven Cooking: 1 semester hour.

Includes basic food preparation, meal planning and the care and use of cast iron dutch ovens. Nightly demonstrations by guest chefs. Candidates will select recipes, buy food, and prepare their own meals. F, S

PEAC 1182C Advanced Dutch Oven Cooking: 1 semester hour.

Expands upon the basics taught in the beginning course. Includes large group meal planning, dutch oven catering, garnishing and presentation of meals, gourmet meal preparation, and competitive cooking. F

PEAC 1185 Basic Mountaineering: 1 semester hour.

Designed for candidates wishing to climb mountains on a non-technical basis. Includes ice axe use, rope team travel, clothing, equipment, hazards, hypothermia, and acute mountain sickness. S

PEAC 1186A Beginning Fly Fishing: 1 semester hour.

Equipment selection, basic techniques of flycasting, basic knots and types of flies are included. Dry fly fishing, nymphing, and streamer fishing included. D

PEAC 1186B Intermediate Fly Fishing: 1 semester hour.

Specialized casting techniques for different conditions included. Selecting and using the proper fly as well as how to read a stream and locate fish will be addressed. Emphasis will be on fishing still waters, small streams and big rivers. PREREQ: PEAC 1186A or permission of instructor. D

PEAC 1186C Advanced Flyfishing Skills: 1 semester hour.

Advanced level specialized techniques including casting, fly selection and use, fish behavior, stream, still water and big water fishing, advanced equipment use, and advanced equipment construction. PREREQ: PEAC 1186B or permission of instructor. F, S

PEAC 1186D Advanced Flyfishing River and Still Water: 1 semester hour.

Equipment selection, advanced techniques of fly-casting, knots and types of flies. River and still water techniques, including dry fly-fishing, nymphing and streamer fishing. F, S

PEAC 1186E Advanced Flyfishing Fly Rod Building: 1 semester hour.

Equipment selection, basic techniques of rod building, basic wrapping and types of blanks. Students will wrap their own rods and apply resin. F, S

PEAC 1187A Beginning Fly Tying: 1 semester hour.

Basic fly tying skills for the beginner. Introduction and explanation of basic tools and materials. Course will include simple nymph, wet and dry fly patterns. D

PEAC 1187B Intermediate Fly Tying: 1 semester hour.

Intermediate level course for the experienced fly-tyer. Advanced patterns included with additional emphasis on innovative materials and techniques. Basic entomology will also be addressed. PREREQ: PEAC 1187A or permission of instructor. D

PEAC 1189 Beginning Gym Climbing: 1 semester hour.

Taught entirely indoors on the Idaho State University Climbing Wall, this course covers climbing knots, belaying procedures, basic equipment, movement techniques, and safety. S

PEAC 1190 Varsity Athletics Bengal Dance Team and Cheerleading: 1 semester hour.

Instruction and participation in ISU Department of Athletics approved sports. Coach's approval required. F, S

PEAC 1191A Basic Horsemanship: 1 semester hour.

Introduces the candidate to horsemanship, safety and riding skills. Includes horse behavior, safety, grooming, tack care, tacking horse, nutrition, fitness, basic skills for the horse and rider. Skills include guiding, posting at a trot, correct leads, flying lead changes, obtaining balanced stops, roll maneuvers and techniques to work the problem horse. F, S

PEAC 1191B Intermediate Horsemanship: 1 semester hour.

Build upon basic skills learned in beginning horsemanship. Intermediate skills include guiding, posting at a trot, correct leads, flying lead changes, stops, roll maneuvers and techniques to work the problem horse. PREREQ: PEAC 1191A or permission of instructor. D

PEAC 1193 Leave No Trace Workshop: 1 semester hour.

Participants will gain a better understanding of LNT practices and outdoor ethics, developing confidence in teaching others about LNT. Through activities, outdoor overnight experience, and discussions, students will look at their own outdoor ethics and be challenged to better develop their skills and practices to lessen their impact on the land. D

PEAC 1194 Caving Workshop: 1 semester hour.

Designed for candidates that want to develop the skills necessary to explore non technical caves. The course covers navigation, equipment, rappelling, light sources, emergency preparation, and the history of caving. S

PEAC 1195A Beginning Disc Golf: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to the sport of Disc Golf. The class covers basic throwing techniques, putting styles and mental preparation for competitive play. F

PEAC 1196 Skateboarding: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to the fundamentals, technique, and overall knowledge of skateboarding. F, S

PEAC 1197 Handball: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to the fundamentals of technique, strategy, and safety in the game of handball. D

PEAC 1198A Team Sports Inline Roller Hockey: 1 semester hour.

Fundamentals of inline hockey, including game rules, safe practices, skating, stick handling, passing, shooting, goaltending, offensive and defensive play, and officiating. D

PEAC 1198B Team Sports Lacrosse: 1 semester hour.

Fundamentals of Lacrosse including: game rules, equipment, safe practices, cradling, passing, catching, scooping, and scrimmaging. D

PEAC 1198C Team Sports Flag Football: 1 semester hour.

Fundamentals of flag football including game rules, equipment, safe practices, passing, catching, offensive and defensive play, and scrimmaging. F

PEAC 1199 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

PEAC 2299 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

This course is not described in the catalog. The course title and number of credits are announced in the class schedule by the scheduling department. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times.

Physical Educ Courses

PE 1160 Women's Rape Aggression Defense: 1 semester hour.

Realistic self-defense tactics and techniques designed for women. Awareness, prevention, risk reduction, risk avoidance, and basic hands-on defense training. R.A.D. is not a Martial Arts program. Equivalent to HE 1160. PREREQ: Permission of Public Safety Office or sponsoring program. F, S

PE 2200 Team Building Leadership: 2 semester hours.

Trains individuals to facilitate and lead on a challenge course. Setup and dismantling of an Alpine Tower course, facilitation of large and small team building groups, safety and rescue techniques. Designed to train participants in pursuit of employment within the challenge course industry. F

PE 2205 Methods and Techniques of Gymnastics: 2 semester hours.

Fundamental methods and techniques for teaching a variety of gymnastic activities, including tumbling and apparatus. D

PE 2222 First Aid CPR and Sport Safety: 3 semester hours.

Course includes training in first aid, CPR and sport safety. The course also covers strategies for reducing the risk of suffering a heart attack. The sport safety portion will cover sports-related injury prevention. F, S, Su

PE 2223 Foundations of Physical Education and Sport: 3 semester hours.

Study, survey, history, philsophy, and ethics of the allied fields and specialty areas of physical education and sport. F, S, Su

PE 2235 Activity Performance Techniques I: 3 semester hours.

Laboratory enhanced skills in field based activities and games. Emphasis on participant skill development and -performance. F, Su

PE 2236 Activity Performance Techniques II: 3 semester hours.

Laboratory enhanced skills in racquet and court sports. Emphasis on participant skill development and performance. S, Su

PE 2237 Activity Performance Techniques III: 3 semester hours.

Laboratory-enhanced skills in fitness and conditioning-based recreation, nontraditional games and activities. Emphasis on skill development and performance. F, Su

PE 2241 Sports Officiating: 1 semester hour.

Proper instruction for game officials and coaches including knowledge of rules, mechanisms of officiating, and game administration. May be repeated for up to 4 credits. D

PE 2243 Anatomical Foundations of Human Activity: 3 semester hours.

Study of human body structure including the neuromuscular, skeletal, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, endocrine, reproductive, and organ systems. Course is designed for health and physical education candidates. F, S, Su

PE 2259 Lifeguarding: 2 semester hours.

Provides a fundamental knowledge and practical application of principles involving lifesaving techniques in an aquatic environment. Academic course work and pool activity are required of all candidates. Can result in American Red Cross certification. Su

PE 2271 Winter Survival Skills: 1 semester hour.

Designed to equip candidates with knowledge necessary for a 72 hour winter survival situation. Content includes winter shelter building, recognizing and treating frostbite, signaling, fire building, survival psychology, nutrition needs, clothing and equipment. S

PE 2272 Wilderness Survival Skills: 1 semester hour.

Designed to provide candidates with knowledge and skills necessary to survive a 72 hour emergency (summer and fall seasons). Includes signaling, shelter building, hypothermia, survival kits, fire building, direction finding and desert hazards. F

PE 2280 Winter Camping and Backcountry Travel: 1 semester hour.

Techniques, equipment and safety of overnight winter wilderness travel, backcountry skiing and snowshoeing. PREREQ: Permission of instructor. S

PE 2281 Practical Outdoor Skills: 1 semester hour.

Study and application of knowledge and skills common to most outdoor activities, and ways in which such skills can be integrated in school, youth and adult activity programs. Practical outdoor knots, map and compass, sheltering strategies, outdoor emergencies, safety procedures, minimal impact techniques, and outdoor team building. F, S

PE 2282 Map Compass and Backcountry Navigation: 1 semester hour.

Practical application of map and compass and wilderness navigation concepts including map and field bearings, declination, resection, contour line interpretation, GPS receiver use, map types, scales, and coordinate systems. F

PE 2283 Leave No Trace Trainer: 1 semester hour.

Principles and practices of minimum impact outdoor techniques including traveling approaches, waste disposal, campsite placement, outdoor ethics, state/federal land management requirements, and sport-specific procedures. Students receive "Leave No Trace" national certification. F

PE 2284 Intermediate Kayaking and Whitewater Safety: 1 semester hour.

Combines practical field experience in moving water with a study of river safety and accident prevention. Topics include hazard evaluation, self and team rescue, case history review, and whitewater safety procedures. PREREQ: PEAC 1175A or permission of instructor. F, S

PE 2285 Wilderness First Aid: 1 semester hour.

Provides an introduction to First Aid and patient care in remote settings. Includes wound and infection management, realigning fractures and dislocations, improvised splinting techniques, patient monitoring and long-term management problems, and up-to-date information on environmental emergencies. F, S

PE 2286 Avalanche and Winter Sports Safety: 1 semester hour.

A study of snow, winter hazards, avalanche safety and rescue. Topics include basic snow physics, crystal identification, metamorphic processes, factors influencing avalanches, use of transceivers, snow pack evaluation, and avalanche rescue techniques. S

PE 2287 Snowboard Instructor Training: 1 semester hour.

Indoors: mechanics of snowboarding, teaching progressions, effective teaching styles and snowboarding techniques. Ourdoors: teaching progressions, snowboarding demos and snowboarding tips. F

PE 2288 Ski Instructor Training: 1 semester hour.

Indoors: skiing mechanics, teaching progressions, effective teaching styles and skiing techniques. Outdoors: teaching progressions, skiing demos and techniques for improved skiing. F

PE 3300 Movement Theory and Motor Development: 3 semester hours.

Introduces the candidate to the science of developmental human movement including fundamental concepts of movement behavior presented in a bio-social context and the concepts of learning in the psychomotor domain. F, S

PE 3301 Physiology of Exercise: 3 semester hours.

Theoretical and applied study of the effects of physical work and exercise on physiological processes of the human body. Lecture and laboratory. PREREQ: PE 2243, or BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3302. COREQ: PE 3301L. F, S, D

PE 3301L Physiology of Exercise Laboratory: 1 semester hour.

Physiological experiments and testing. COREQ: PE 3301. F, S, D

PE 3302 Biomechanics: 3 semester hours.

The study of anatomical and mechanical principles that apply to human movement. Study will include exercise and sport applications. Lecture and laboratory. PREREQ: PE 2243, or BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3302; and PHYS 1100 or PHYS 1111. COREQ: PE 3302L. F, S, D

PE 3302L Biomechanics Laboratory: 1 semester hour.

Biomechanical experiments and testing. COREQ: PE 3302. F, S, D

PE 3303 Kinesiology for Teachers and Coaches: 3 semester hours.

The study of the scientific foundations of human activity including exercise physiology and biomechanics. Some laboratory activities included. Course is designed for non-exercise science emphasis health and physical education candidates. PREREQ: PE 2243. S

PE 3312 Practical Applications of Coaching Baseball and Softball: 2 semester hours.

Essential elements of coaching baseball and softball. Emphasis on application and practice in the educational setting. D

PE 3313 Practical Applications of Coaching Basketball: 2 semester hours.

Essential elements of coaching basketball. Emphasis on application and practice in the educational setting. F

PE 3314 Practical Applications of Coaching Football: 2 semester hours.

Essential elements of coaching football. Emphasis on application and practice in the educational setting. S

PE 3315 Practical Applications of Coaching Soccer: 2 semester hours.

Essential elements of coaching soccer. Emphasis on application and practice in the educational setting. D

PE 3316 Practical Applications of Coaching Tennis: 2 semester hours.

Essential elements of coaching tennis. Emphasis on application and practice in the educational setting. D

PE 3317 Practical Applications of Coaching Track and Field: 2 semester hours.

Essential elements of coaching track and field. Emphasis on application and practice in the educational setting. S

PE 3318 Practical Applications of Coaching Volleyball: 2 semester hours.

Essential elements of coaching volleyball. Emphasis on application and practice in the educational setting. S

PE 3319 Practical Applications of Coaching Wrestling: 2 semester hours.

Essential elements of coaching wrestling. Emphasis on application and practice in the educational setting. D

PE 3322 Introduction to Sport Psychology: 3 semester hours.

Study of theoretical and applied psychological parameters in sport settings. Specific topics include the coach-athlete relationship and issues in sport performance. Also includes motivation, leadership, communication, ethics, and intervention strategies. F, S

PE 3357 Methods of Teaching Elementary Physical Education: 3 semester hours.

Prepares candidates to teach elementary physical education activities. Emphasis on a variety of teaching methods and their application to all skill levels at the elementary level. PREREQ: Admission to College of Education Teacher Education Program or permission of instructor. F, S, Su

PE 3358 Water Safety Instructors Course: 3 semester hours.

Techniques of teaching swimming, diving, and community water safety skills including small craft safety. Emphasis on skill progressions and planning/organizing courses. American Red Cross certificate awarded if examination is passed. Su

PE 3362 Tests and Measurements in Physical Education: 3 semester hours.

Study of constructive practical and written tests applicable to physical education. Study of the theory of practice of test administration, brief study of statistical methods and measurements in physical education. F

PE 3364 Introduction to Sport Law: 3 semester hours.

Study of the law as it relates to physical education and sport. Includes fields of tort law, criminal law, contract law, and constitutional law as they relate to physical education and sport settings. F

PE 3366 Sport Marketing: 3 semester hours.

Study of sport marketing theory, basic economics, accounting, and budgeting principles. Additional topics will also include sport marketing strategies and tactics, sponsorships, and sport licensing. S

PE 3370 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries: 3 semester hours.

Basic care, prevention, evaluation, and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. Includes instruction in athletic taping and wrapping. PREREQ: PE 2243, or BIOL 3301 and BIOL 3302. F, S

PE 3380 Field Experience: 1 semester hour.

Orientation, observation, planning and supervised experience exposes the candidate to activity instruction under the direction of a major advisor. D

PE 3381 River Safety and Swiftwater Rescue: 1 semester hour.

A comprehensive safety and rescue course for river users and rescue service personnel. Topics include safety equipment, river hazards, river crossings, tag line procedures, zip line and Z-pulley use, moving water extrications, and first aid considerations. Su

PE 3383 Advanced Rock Climbing and Climbing Safety: 2 semester hours.

A comprehensive examination of climbing safety - anchor placement, self-rescue, belaying, route protection, case history review, equipment limitations - along with field experience including lead and aid climbing, advanced knots, movement techniques, and minimal impact procedures. PREREQ: PEAC 1176A or permission of instructor. S

PE 3384 Outdoor Risk Management and Liability: 3 semester hours.

Legal implications of outdoor recreation programming including a study of tort liability, risk evaluation, relevant case law, legal management strategies, and the use of waivers and releases. F

PE 3386 Outdoor Leadership: 3 semester hours.

Designed to provide candidates with the knowledge to organize and lead outdoor activities. Includes leadership styles, liability, program promotion, planning, safety, and environmental impact. Practical experiences are included. S

PE 3397 Professional Education Development: 1-3 semester hours.

A course for the practicing educator aimed at the development and improvement of educational skills. Various sections will have different subtitles. A maximum of 10 credits may be applied to fifth year program. Graded S/U. D

PE 4413 Sport in Cinema: 3 semester hours.

Investigate sport, and the treatment of sport, through the medium of modern cinema. Sport will be analyzed from the sociological, psychological, moral and ethical perspective of the filmmakers. D

PE 4427 Personal Trainer Certification: 3 semester hours.

Theoretical knowledge and practical skills in preparation for national certification exam in personal training. Guidelines for instructing safe, effective and purposeful exercise; essentials for the client-trainer relationship, conducting health and fitness assessments, and designing and implementing appropriate exercise programming. S

PE 4437 Methods of Teaching Secondary Physical Education: 3 semester hours.

Designed to prepare the candidate for teaching secondary physical education activities. Emphasis on a variety of teaching methods and their application to all skill levels at the secondary level. PREREQ: Admission to College of Education Teacher Education Program or permission of instructor. S

PE 4440 Survey of Outdoor Education Literature: 3 semester hours.

An examination of recent research, literature and contemporary writing in outdoor education. Course work consists of a series of reading assignments followed by oral reports and class discussions. F

PE 4441 Wilderness First Responder Certification: 3 semester hours.

80-hour certification program, including cardiac and respiratory emergencies, allergies and anaphylaxis, wound management and infection, neurological and spinal injuries, realignment of fractures and dislocations, rescue and extraction, patient monitoring and long term management problems. S

PE 4445 Methods of Teaching Outdoor Activities and Practicum: 3-4 semester hours.

This culminating course for outdoor education minors consists of two parts: a study of the objectives, programs and methods of teaching outdoor recreation activities followed by a practicum experience in which candidates assist in teaching and leading outdoor activities. PREREQ: PE 3386, PE 4440, and permission of instructor. S

PE 4454 Senior Capstone: 3 semester hours.

Professional development strategies for all undergraduate majors in Sport Science and Physical Education. Explore job strategies, career development opportunities, and field and research experience in the professional areas of Sport Management, Exercise Science, Physical Education Teaching, and Outdoor Education. PREREQ: Permission of instructor. F, S

PE 4465 Organization and Administration of Intramural Sports: 3 semester hours.

Study of various methods of organizing and administering intramural sports programs on the junior high school, high school, and college levels. D

PE 4473 Facilities Planning and Design: 3 semester hours.

An investigation of the various components, principles, and fundamental practices involved in facility planning and design for physical education, athletics, and recreation. S

PE 4475 Organization and Administration of Physical Education: 3 semester hours.

Study of the management theory and practices utilized in conducting physical education and sport programs. Emphasis will be placed on interscholastic as well as intercollegiate physical education and athletic programs. F

PE 4480 Coaching Problems: 1-3 semester hours.

Athletic control, eligibility, new coaching techniques, finances, safety measures, public relations, duties of coaches, managers, and officials. May be repeated for up to 4 credits. F, S, Su

PE 4481 Coaching Clinic: 1 semester hour.

Idaho State University is a sponsor of the annual Idaho Coaches Association Clinic held during the first week of August. Instruction offered in football, basketball, and other sports by coaches of national reputation. Total cost of registration at the clinic, board, room, and privileges for the full period of the clinic will be about $50. An extra fee will be charged for those who register at the clinic for credit. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. Graded S/U. Credits will not be acceptable for degree completion requirements/electives. D

PE 4482 Mechanical Analysis of Human Movement: 3 semester hours.

Advanced study of assessing human motion patterns. Course will include computer analysis and videography techniques along with various field analysis techniques utilized in physical skill analyses. PREREQ: PE 3302. F, S

PE 4484 Exercise Assessment and Prescription: 3 semester hours.

Design and principles of exercise assessment procedures in physical education and sport setting. Physical Fitness testing concepts and procedures will be covered along with the principles involved when prescribing exercise programs for physical education and sport participants. PREREQ: PE 3301. F, S

PE 4485 Independent Problems in Physical Education: 1-3 semester hours.

Individual work under staff guidance. Field and/or library study on specific physical education problems of interest to majors and minors. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. PREREQ: Permission of instructor. F, S, Su

PE 4490 Practicum in Physical Education: 1-16 semester hours.

Practical experience in a field based setting, congruent with candidate's employment goals. May require multiple experiences in a variety of settings outside K-12 school settings. F, S, Su

PE 4491 Physical Education Workshop: 1-3 semester hours.

Critical analysis of one or more areas of physical education. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. PREREQ: Permission of instructor. D

PE 4493 Introduction to Sport Sociology: 3 semester hours.

Using the topics of youth, violence, gender, race/ethnicity, social class, media, and politics as a springboard, students will explore issues of social justice and diversity in sport and physical education settings. PREREQ: General Education Goal 1. F, ASu

PE 4494 Adapted Physical Activity: 3 semester hours.

History, philosophy, and the teaching/learning processes in providing adapted physical activity in schools and community-based settings. Includes clinical experiences. PREREQ: BIOL 3301 or equivalent, or PE 2243, PE 3300, and PE 3362. S

PE 4495 Physical Education Student Teaching Internship: 7-14 semester hours.

Observation and teaching under supervision in approved physical education programs with the opportunity to assume direct responsibility for the learning activities of secondary level students. Includes weekly professional development seminar. PREREQ: Admission to Teacher Education Program and approved application for student teaching. Graded S/U. F, S

Faculty

Chair and Associate Professor

Fitzpatrick

Professors

Appleby

Lester

Lyons

Associate Professors

Faure

Gauthier

Meyers

Assistant Professors

Braun

Moffit

Associate Lecturers

Cordingley

Foster

Emeriti

Noakes

Watters

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