Department of Counseling

Department of Counseling

Department Mission Statement

The principle mission of the Department of Counseling is to prepare quality counselors for various settings in Idaho and the nation. More specifically, we seek to prepare quality School Counselors for public schools in K-12 settings; Marriage, Couple and Family Counselors and Clinical Mental Health Counselors for community agencies and other mental health settings; and Student Affairs Counselors for working in college settings such as advising and residence halls, and career centers.

We additionally prepare doctoral level counselor educators and supervisors to work primarily in institutions of higher learning as faculty members in counselor education programs.

We believe that it is also our mission to:

  • instill a strong sense of professional identity in students,
  • help students gain an appreciation of the rich knowledge base in counselor education,
  • develop student expertise in the skills of counseling,
  • aid students to become certified and/or licensed,
  • aid students/graduates in their initial job placement,
  • teach and perform research applicable to the practice of counseling, and counselor education and supervision,
  • aid students in understanding the diversity of views and cultures within our profession and the environment in which counselors practice.

The Department of Counseling also has a mission within the Kasiska Division of Health Sciences, School of Health Professions, which is to represent the mental health perspective within the Division and to consult with Division faculty and departments in encouraging a holistic perspective toward health care services.

Goals and Objectives

The general objective of the Master of Counseling (M.COUN.) degree is to prepare students to be professional counselors. The Department of Counseling faculty believe that the development of a strong professional identity, a rich knowledge base, and expertise in the skills of counseling are essential to functioning as a professional in each counseling setting.

The Master of Counseling degree is designed to be the strong foundation upon which graduates enter a lifetime career in the helping professions. This program prepares counselors to respond to the multitude of societal changes, and to the ever-expanding counseling profession. In addition to knowledge and experience in the following eight common-core areas, graduates have specialized knowledge and skills as identified in the objectives of the Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling, Clinical Mental Health Counseling, School Counseling, and Student Affairs Counseling majors. For more specific details, please reference http://www.cacrep.org.

The Department of Counseling has curricular and professional objectives for each Master of Counseling student. Each of these objectives has specific outcome measures:

Curricular Objectives:

  1. Students will have knowledge of human growth and development in order to understand the nature and needs of persons at all developmental levels and in multicultural contexts.
  2. Students will have knowledge of social and cultural foundations to be effective in a multicultural and diverse ­society.
  3. Students will be knowledgeable and skillful in counseling and consultation processes.
  4. Students will be knowledgeable about group development, dynamics, counseling theory, group counseling methods, and group work approaches.
  5. Students will be knowledgeable and understand career development and related factors.
  6. Students will understand and be ­knowledgeable about individual and group approaches to assessment and ­evaluation.
  7. Students will be knowledgeable about various research methods and statistical analysis needs assessment and program evaluation.
  8. Students will be knowledgeable about the profession of counseling including history, organizational structures, ethics, standards and credentialing.

Student Professional Objectives:

In addition to the above curricular objectives, the Department of Counseling has program specific objectives. These include:

  1. School counseling students will obtain certification as school counselors.
  2. Students in all majors (Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling, Clinical Mental Health Counseling, School Counseling, and Student Affairs Counseling) will obtain state licensure as professional counselors (i.e., LPC).

Counseling

Graduate-level preparation for (1) counselors who seek employment in schools, universities, community mental health and various other settings, and (2) college student affairs professionals.

Pre-Counseling and Pre-Student Affairs

Preparation should consist of a broad ­undergraduate course of study including some work in psychology (learning and ­personality theory), sociology, and the communication skills. For those seeking positions in public elementary and ­secondary schools, state ­certification ­requirements should be ­considered.

Undergraduates interested in continuing their education in the Master of Counseling program should consider enrolling in the Seminar course, COUN 4490 entitled Introduction to Counseling Services. This 1-credit course is offered each Fall semester.

Degree Programs

Degree programs offered by the department, all at the graduate level, include Doctor of Philosophy, Educational Specialist, and Master of Counseling. ­Majors are available in Counselor Education and Counseling (Ph.D.); Counseling (Ed.S.), Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling (M.COUN.); Clinical Mental Health Counseling (M.COUN.); School Counseling (M.COUN.); and Student Affairs Counseling (M.COUN.).

Accreditation

The program for school counselor preparation is credentialed by the State of Idaho.

The Counselor Education programs approved by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs are as follows: Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling (M.COUN.), Clinical Mental Health Counseling (M.COUN.), School Counseling (M.COUN.), Student Affairs Counseling (M.COUN.), and Counselor Education and Counseling (Ph.D.).

Admission

Admission to the Department of Counseling Master’s program is based on a variety of criteria outlined in the Graduate Catalog. Because of limited class sizes and the large number of applicants, admission into the De­partment of Counseling is highly ­competitive.

For more information about the graduate programs offered through ISU's Department of Counseling, please refer to the School of Health Professions within the Graduate Catalog, or visit the department's website at: www.isu.edu/hpcounsl/.

How to Read Course Descriptions

Courses

COUN 1150 Career and Life Planning: 1 semester hour.

Centers on theories and actual processes of effective decision-making with direct application to participants' short and long range life goals. Course will emphasize self-understanding and methods for gathering appropriate external information. Career decisions are emphasized. PREREQ: Permission of instructor. F, S

COUN 1198P Professional Development Workshop: 3 semester hours.

New methods and opportunities to enhance and supplement skills. Subject to the approval of the Dean of the student's college, a maximum of eight credits earned in workshops may be applied toward a degree; students taking the courses only for personal development may choose the 0-credit option; those seeking professional development must choose a for-credit option.

COUN 2200 Multicultural Development: 1 semester hour.

Acquaints students with information related to the appreciation of individual differences as it relates to race, gender, and national origin in a pluralistic society. D

COUN 2201 Introduction to Leadership: 1 semester hour.

Contemporary approaches to leadership with an emphasis on the practical application of theoretical models. Graded S/U. D

COUN 2210 Human Relations at Work: 3 semester hours.

The development of knowledge and skills to enhance cooperation between employers and employees in various work settings. Exploration of current thought on the nature, process, and diversity of human interaction as it applies to the world of work. D

COUN 2299 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

This course is not described in the catalog. The course title and number of credits are announced in the class schedule by the scheduling department. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times.

COUN 3300 Interpersonal Skills in Health Professions: 2 semester hours.

Theory and practice in the use of effective interpersonal communication skills and styles for health care providers. D

COUN 3350 Self Fulfilling Behavior: 1 semester hour.

Course objective is to assist the student in developing satisfying personal and interpersonal emotional skills and habits. Combines instruction in principles of mental health with practical methods for applying principles to problems of everyday life. PREREQ: Permission of instructor. Graded S/U. D

COUN 4423 Vocational Guidance and Counseling: 3 semester hours.

Study of occupational trends, job opportunities, factors involved in selecting an occupation and means of evaluating interests in terms of capabilities. D

COUN 4484 Guidance Principles and Practices: 3 semester hours.

Survey of the various guidance practices in secondary education. Each service is discussed from the point of view of its role in the total educational program. D

COUN 4485 Independent Problems: 1,2 semester hour.

Individual work under staff guidance. Field and/or library research on specific educational problems of interest to majors. Experience in research composition. PREREQ: Permission of instructor. D

COUN 4490 Introduction to Counseling Services: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to the counseling profession, including an overview of the curriculum, experience and skills needed to be a successful licensed counselor. F, S

COUN 4491 Seminar: 1-3 semester hours.

Critical analysis of the literature in one or more areas. Limited enrollment. May be repeated up to 8 credits. PREREQ: Permission of instructor. May be graded S/U or with letter grades in separate sections. F, S, Su

COUN 4494 Elementary School Guidance: 2 semester hours.

Study of (1) the function of guidance in relation to children's needs; (2) principles and techniques of elementary school guidance; (3) analysis of representative programs of guidance in the elementary schools; and (4) research related to elementary school guidance and resulting trends. D

COUN 4498P Professional Development Workshop: 3 semester hours.

New methods and opportunities to enhance and supplement skills. Subject to the approval of the Dean of the student's college, a maximum of eight credits earned in workshops may be applied toward a degree; students taking the courses only for personal development may choose the 0-credit option; those seeking professional development must choose a for-credit option.

COUN 4499 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

This is an experimental course. The course title and number of credits are announced in the class schedule by the scheduling department. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content.

Faculty

Chair and Professor

Kleist

Associate Professors

Crews

Erickson

Horn

Assistant Professors

Astramovich

Coe Smith

Moody

Stewart

Yates

Clinical assistant professor

Singarajah

Adjunct Faculty

Bohecker

Cook

Millican

Niece

Schmidt

Thompson

Tivis

Emeriti

Allen

Edgar

Feit

Lloyd

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