Social Work

Mission

The four programs in the Department are interconnected. The Department contributes to the mission of the College of Arts and Letters by encouraging collaboration with other departments and programs within the College. The Department concentrates on research, theory, and service in regard to the community. The community plays a pivotal role in the life of individuals and it serves as a platform from which to study health and illness, diversity and social hierarchies, and criminal justice. The focus on community issues enables us to showcase the usefulness of sociology at the graduate and undergraduate levels; to create a niche for social work, particularly in the areas of child welfare, gerontology, and sexual diversity; and to find a pivotal role for criminal justice by emphasizing rehabilitation and reintegration of offenders into the community. The agenda of the DHHS Healthy People 2020 serves as concrete guideline for conducting qualitative and quantitative research, theory building, and the generation of external funding.

The Department of Sociology, Social Work and Criminal Justice offers courses leading to the Associate of Arts degree in criminal justice, the Bachelor of Arts degree in sociology or social work, and the Master of Arts degrees in sociology. For a full description of the M.A. degrees, refer to the Graduate Catalog.

As a graduate of the program, the student is eligible to apply for licensure as a social worker to the State of Idaho. Many excellent career opportunities for social workers are available in the areas of family and children’s services, adult and juvenile corrections, health care, community mental health and services for senior citizens.

Outcome Objectives

The objectives of the Sociology program are:

  1. To gain a well-rounded knowledge of the fields of the discipline.
  2. To develop an understanding of how sociologists think, gather information, process data and reach tentative conclusions.
  3. To sort out trends in social data.
  4. To assist in conflict resolution between groups of people in society.
  5. To engage in problem solving based on varying patterns of behavior of diverse groups.
  6. To be exposed to a rich variety of perspectives and ideas.
  7. To prepare for a career after graduation that is related to the sociology major.

The goals of the Social Work ­program are:

  1. Preparation of students for beginning generalist social work practice with individuals, families, small groups, organizations and communities.
  2. Preparation of students to develop an identity which will incorporate the values, principles and ethics of the social work profession.
  3. Preparation of students as beginning social work generalists who link social research and social work practice.
  4. Preparation of students for lifelong learning and critical thinking through an educational process combining a liberal arts foundation and a professional foundation.
  5. Preparation of students to work with diverse, vulnerable, oppressed and ­disadvantaged populations.

Admission to the Social Work Program

Application for admission to the Social Work Program is required of all students desiring to progress toward a social work major. Admission to the Social Work Program is competitive. Students may apply to the major at the completion of the sophomore year and after completing or with current enrollment in required prerequisite Objectives and courses.

The following criteria must be met for an applicant to be eligible for consideration for admission to the social work major:

  1. Completion of a minimum of 61 credit hours with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 for the semester at the time of application.
  2. Completion of or with current enrollment in the following Objectives and departmental requirements: Objectives 1, 3, 4, and 5, and 6, and SOC 2248, SOWK 2271, SOWK 2272, and MATH 1153 with a minimum grade of “C” in each course.
  3. Completion of the Application for admission to the Social Work Major including a $30 application fee, a three to five-page typed statement explaining why you would like to be a social worker and why you might be a good fit for the Social Work Program at Idaho State University, and an unofficial copy of your transcript. See online application form for further details, at http://www.isu.edu/sociology/pdf/swapp.pdf.
  4. Students must have a background check performed by https://www.certifiedbackground.com/ The cost to the student is approximately $45. The criminal history check must be “in progress” or completed before application is submitted. A background check conducted by the Department of Health & Welfare within six months of application to the Social Work program is acceptable with documentation. Senior practicum agencies may require an additional background check. For further information, please refer to the Faculty/Staff Handbook at http://www.isu.edu/fs-handbook/part6/6_4/6_4o.html.
  5. Completion of a Declaration of Major form.

Application Deadline

The above admission materials must be completed and submitted to the Department of Social Work prior to February 15 for fall semester admission, and prior to October 1 for Spring semester admission.

The Social Work Program does not grant credit for previous life or work experience.

All social work majors are required to meet the above standards before they may enroll in upper division social work courses (those numbered 3000 and above). Pre-social work students enrolled in upper division courses without admission to the major will be withdrawn until major admission ­requirements have been met.

Admission to 4000 Level Courses

Admission to the senior field courses (SOWK 4476-SOWK 4477) is contingent upon completion of the following:

a. Completion of SOC 3308/SOWK 3308, SOWK 3371, SOWK 3372, SOWK 3373, and SOC 3309 with a minimum GPA of 2.5;
b. Maintenance of GPA to senior year at the 2.5 level;
c. Submission of form applying for senior field experience;
d. Interview by program senior field placement coordinator prior to notification of field agencies.

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology

Sociology deals with social institutions, activities, and patterns of behavior of diverse groups. The challenge for sociologists is to sort out trends and to find ways to resolve the conflicts between groups of people. The sociology major provides students with background in the basic theoretical, research, and substantive areas of the discipline. The field of sociology leads to an understanding of the social forces impinging upon one’s life and can lead to careers in many diverse settings.

Sociology majors must attain a grade of "C" or better in all required and elective courses.

Students completing the Bachelor of Arts must complete 8 of the 9 General Education Objectives (a minimum of 36 credits--see the General Education Requirements described in the Academic Information section of this catalog.)

Required Courses for Graduation

SOC 1101Introduction to Sociology3
SOC 3301Classical Social Theory3
SOC/SOWK 3308Sociological Methods and Social Work Research3
SOC 3309Social Statistics3
SOC 4403Contemporary Social Theory3
SOC 4462Power Class and Prestige3
Elective Courses 118
Total Hours36

1

In addition to the required courses, students are expected to complete 18 credit hours from any of the remaining courses in the Sociology curriculum excluding SOC 4482. Fifteen (15) of the elective credit hours must be upper division.

 

Minor in Sociology

Required Courses

SOC 1101Introduction to Sociology (partially satisfies General Education Objective 6)3
SOC 3301Classical Social Theory3
SOC/SOWK 3308Sociological Methods and Social Work Research3
SOC 4462Power Class and Prestige3
Elective Courses 19
Total Hours21

1

With the approval of a Department of Sociology faculty member, the student shall select nine credit hours from any of the electives listed for the sociology major.


Bachelor of Arts in Social Work

The Social Work Program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education at the Baccalaureate level. As such it provides students with a generalist framework for beginning professional social work practice. Social workers help individuals, families, groups, and ­communities meet basic human needs and enhance the quality of life.

General Education Requirements

Students completing the Bachelor of Arts must complete 8 of the 9 General Education Objectives (a minimum of 36 credits--see the General Education Requirements described in the Academic Information section of this catalog.) Certain Objectives may be met using Social Work Program requirements; for example:

Objective 3: MATH 1108 (Intermediate Algebra) and MATH 1153 (Introduction to Statistics);

Objective 5: BIOL 1100, BIOL 1100L (Concepts Biology: Human Concerns, and Lab);

Objective 6: ECON 1100 (Economic Issues) and PSYC 1101 (Introduction to General Psychology) or SOC 1101 (Introduction to Sociology).

Social Work Requirements

PSYC 3301Abnormal Psychology I3
SOC 1101Introduction to Sociology (partially satisfies General Education Objective 6)3
SOC 2248Critical Analysis of Social Diversity3
SOWK 2271Introduction to Social Work3
SOWK 2272Human Behavior and the Social Environment3
SOC/SOWK 3308Sociological Methods and Social Work Research3
SOC 3309Social Statistics3
SOWK 3371Social Welfare Policy3
SOWK 3372Practice with Individuals and Families3
SOWK 3373Group Work3
SOWK 3375Advanced Social Work Theory and Practice3
SOWK 4476Social Work Field Practicum I6
SOWK 4477Social Work Field Practicum II6
SOWK 4494Community Organization and Social Change3
SOWK 4498Integration of Social Work Methods3
Upper-Division SOC, SOWK, Criminal Justice, or PSYC courses 16

Note: Upper division courses are those numbered 3000-4999. Social Work students must attain a C or better in departmental and Social Work requirements.

1

Social Work Electives Include:

*May be repeated; with different content; up to 9 credits may be used toward graduation.

 

Associate of Arts in Criminal Justice

In their second semester, students need to choose an advisor in the Criminal Justice Program.

Students completing the Associate of Arts must complete 8 of the 9 General Education Objectives (a minimum of 36 credits - see the General Education Requirements in the Academic Information section of this catalog).

Required Courses (21 credits):

POLS 2249Introduction to Criminal Law3
SOC 1102Social Problems (partially satisfies General Education Objective 6)3
SOC 2231Juvenile Delinquency3
SOC 2248Critical Analysis of Social Diversity (satisfies General Education Objective 7)3
SOC 2250Women Crime and Corrections3
SOC 2295Criminal Justice Internship1-4
SOC 4431Criminology3

Electives from the following courses to reach a total of at least 64 credits:

PSYC 2200Child Abuse3
OR
PSYC 2225Child Development3
OR
PSYC 3301Abnormal Psychology I3
PSYC 2205Human Sexuality3
SOC 4436Elite Deviance and Crime3
SOC 4438Sexual Crimes3
SOC 4492Topics in Criminal Justice 13

1

This is a 1-credit course that may be repeated with different content to reach the required credits.

Credit Requirements for Graduation:

General Education Requirements(min) 38
Associate of Arts in Criminal Justice 127
Total Credits65

1

Six (6) of the credits in the 36 listed for General Education are also in the 27 required for the degree.



Social Work Courses

SOWK 2271 Introduction to Social Work: 3 semester hours.

Introductory overview and history of the social work profession within the social welfare system, and introduction to the generalist model of practice in social work. Attention is given to micro, mezzo, and macro levels of practice as social workers may work with individuals, families, groups or communities. Students will examine their own beliefs and values and their social, cultural, and historical positioning, and how these forces influence interactions with potential clients. Students will be introduced to ethics, values and standards of the social work profession. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to apply critical thinking skills to class material. F, S

SOWK 2272 Human Behavior and the Social Environment: 3 semester hours.

Conceptual frameworks and issues in human behavior and development across the lifespan, with attention given to the concept of person in the environment as a framework for understanding individual behavior as a function of bio-psycho-social-spiritual processes and interactions. Substantial information on human diversity and at-risk populations, including issues pertaining to racial and ethnic groups, and gender and sexual orientations. F, S

SOWK 2299 Experimental Course: 1-3 semester hour.

This course is not described in the catalog. The course title and number of credits are announced in the class schedule by the scheduling department. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times

SOWK 3308 Sociological Methods and Social Work Research: 3 semester hours.

Introduces the principles and procedures of scientific research and includes a variety of strategies and tools for studying social phenomena. Equivalent to SOC 3308. PREREQ: C in SOC 1101. F

SOWK 3371 Social Welfare Policy: 3 semester hours.

Examine social policies created as society's strategy for addressing social concerns such as unemployment, poverty, and mental illness. Students will critically evaluate programs and policies in order to develop skills to advance social and economic justice and to deliver effective social work services. PREREQ: Admission to Social Work Major. S

SOWK 3372 Practice with Individuals and Families: 3 semester hours.

Examine micro level systems within the generalist social work framework. Theoretical frameworks for use with individuals and families as well as interviewing and problem-resolution methods will be covered. Students will utilize a generalist skill base in learning to engage, assess, intervene and evaluate individuals and families. PREREQ: Admission to Social Work Major. F, S

SOWK 3373 Group Work: 3 semester hours.

Mezzo level systems within the generalist social work framework. Group theory, process, dynamics, and practice applications will be covered. Students will use a generalist skill base in learning to engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate small group systems. PREREQ: SOWK 3372. F, S

SOWK 3375 Advanced Social Work Theory and Practice: 3 semester hours.

Expansion of theory and practice concepts introduced in SOWK 2272 and used in social work practice courses. The relationship between social work theory and practice is explored for the purpose of increasing depth of understanding and generalization of knowledge. Focus will be on application of theory in building skills necessary for competency including written and oral communication skills, using research evidence to inform practice, and critiquing and utilizing major theoretical frameworks to guide the processes of engagement, assessment, intervention, and evaluation. S

SOWK 4417 Interdisciplinary Evaluation Team: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to principles, techniques of interdisciplinary evaluation. Disciplines emphasized: Audiology, Nursing, Physical Therapy, Psychology, Social Work, Special Education, Speech-Language Pathology. Equivalent to NURS 4417, PSYC 4417, and CSD 4417. PREREQ: Permission of instructor. S

SOWK 4436 Elite Deviance and Crime: 3 semester hours.

Explores the types of criminal behaviors engaged in by the American socioeconomic and corporate elite. The course first explores and identifies who this elite is and then examines their ideological and economic history in American society. Specific examples of elite and corporate crime are presented and discussed in class. Equivalent to SOC 4436 and POLS 4436. F

SOWK 4438 Sexual Crimes: 3 semester hours.

Complex relationships of human sexuality to law and crime. A range of sexual attitudes, practices and lifestyles will be discussed in the context of cultural norms, legal parameters and personal expression. Students will be introduced to cultural variations in defining and addressing sexuality and crime. Current theoretical explanations of sexual offending and U.S. social policies and clinical interventions for sexual offenders. Equivalent to SOC 4438. S

SOWK 4476 Social Work Field Practicum I: 6 semester hours.

Placement within a social service agency under direct supervision of a licensed social worker for a minimum of 200 hours and a weekly on-campus seminar. Functions as an entry level opportunity for the student to apply professional values, knowledge and skills. Seminar permits discussion and reflection upon this field experience and serves an integrative function for linking theory to applied practice. PREREQ: SOC/SOWK 3308, SOWK 3371, SOWK 3372, SOWK 3373, and SOC 3309. (For Spring Only: COREQ: SOWK 4477.) F, S

SOWK 4477 Social Work Field Practicum II: 6 semester hours.

Continuation of senior field practicum experience consisting of placement within a social service agency under direct supervision of a licensed social worker for a minimum of 200 hours and a weekly on-campus seminar. Students will refine and utilize professional values, knowledge and skills. Seminar permits discussion and reflection upon this field experience and serves an integrative function for linking theory to applied practice. PREREQ: SOC/SOWK 3308, SOWK 3371, SOWK 3372, SOWK 3373, and SOC 3309. PREREQ or COREQ: SOWK 4476. COREQ: SOWK 4498. F, S

SOWK 4482 Independent Problems: 1-6 semester hour.

Consultation course. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. PREREQ: 12 credits in Social Work and permission of instructor. D

SOWK 4484 Title IV-E Scholar Seminar: 1 semester hour.

Professional competencies required for social work practice in foster care and adoption assistance programs, to prepare students for career advancement in public child welfare, and to prepare students for child welfare practice addressed by Title IV-E of the Social Security Act. PREREQ: Permission of instructor. COREQ: SOWK 4476 or SOWK 4477. D

SOWK 4485 Grief and Loss for the Helping Professional: 3 semester hours.

Prepares students to work with clients experiencing grief and loss issues stemming from a variety of loss experiences including death, physical health changes, trauma, and life transitions. Includes the philosophical, cultural, medical, psychological, and spiritual aspects of grieving and loss; the grief process and factors to consider in working with children, adolescents, and adults; and assessment of complicated grief reactions. D

SOWK 4486 Family Issues for the Helping Professional: 3 semester hours.

Advanced course focusing on understanding families and family issues. Explore techniques for assessment and intervention drawn from various current theories. Special focus on at-risk youth and the effects on family dynamics. D

SOWK 4487 Child Welfare Issues: 3 semester hours.

An exploration of the many facets of child welfare, including factors impacting the well-being of children and their families on a local and global level, such as governmental policies and societal values regarding child welfare, social issues that affect children, available services for children, and social work intervention strategies

SOWK 4491 Seminar: 3 semester hours.

Topical reading, discussion, exploration, experience, and demonstration of learning on selected topics. May be repeated for up to 9 credits with different content. D

SOWK 4494 Community Organization and Social Change: 3 semester hours.

Advanced focus on community and organizational structure and function. Uses the generalist model of social work with macro level systems including building knowledge and skills focusing on social action and social change. Specific attention is given to helping students develop necessary skills to engage, assess, intervene and evaluate with organizations and communities (macro level) effectively. PREREQ: SOWK 3372. F

SOWK 4498 Integration of Social Work Methods: 3 semester hours.

Comprehensive review and synthesis of all social work content areas within the generalist framework including ethics, critical thinking, diversity, human rights, social and economic justice, research, HBSE, policy and practice. Preparation for Social Work licensure test as well as special topics depending on student need and interests are also covered. PREREQ: SOWK 3308, SOWK 3371, SOWK 3372, SOWK 3373, and SOC 3309. COREQ: SOWK 4477. F, S

SOWK 4499 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hour.

This course is not described in the catalog. The course title and number of credits are announced in the class schedule by the scheduling department. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times

Sociology Courses

SOC 1101 Introduction to Sociology: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the scientific point of view in the study of group life, social institutions, and processes. Partially satisfies Objective 6 of the General Education Requirements. F, S

SOC 1102 Social Problems: 3 semester hours.

Theoretical analyses and application of research to selected social issues and social institutions such as politics, economics, education, medicine, families, the military, crime and corrections, religion and related major social forces. Partially satisfies Objective 6 of the General Education Requirements. F, S

SOC 2231 Juvenile Delinquency: 3 semester hours.

Theories of delinquency, criminal behavior, and law enforcement in relation to the modern social institutions in American culture. PREREQ: SOC 1101 or SOC 1102. F, S

SOC 2248 Critical Analysis of Social Diversity: 3 semester hours.

Critical analysis of historical and contemporary issues and debates surrounding social categories such as race, class, gender, ethnicity, religion, and sexuality. Students will utilize and assess various sociological theories and will critically examine how social diversity affects and is affected by other social and cultural dynamics. Satisfies Objective 7 of the General Education Requirements. F, S

SOC 2250 Women Crime and Corrections: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of theories and research applicable to women's involvement in crime, correctional centers and in professional roles in the criminal justice system. PREREQ: SOC 1102. S

SOC 2295 Criminal Justice Internship: 1-4 semester hour.

Required reading assignments and daily journal to be completed. Maximum of four credits per semester. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. PREREQ: Permission of instructor. F, S, Su

SOC 2299 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hour.

This course is not described in the catalog. The course title and number of credits are announced in the class schedule by the scheduling department. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times

SOC 3301 Classical Social Theory: 3 semester hours.

A survey of the foundation of sociological thought from the Enlightenment to 1945. The focus is on the recurring themes in sociology and the importance of classical theory to understanding contemporary sociological theory and current social issues. PREREQ: SOC 1101. D

SOC 3308 Sociological Methods and Social Work Research: 3 semester hours.

Introduces the principles and procedures of scientific research and includes a variety of strategies and tools for studying social phenomena. Equivalent to SOWK 3308. PREREQ: C in SOC 1101. F

SOC 3309 Social Statistics: 3 semester hours.

A survey of statistical techniques focusing on descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing and correlations. Students work in computer labs and use software for statistical analysis commonly used in the social sciences to produce descriptive and summary statistics for large data sets. PREREQ: C in MATH 1153. S

SOC 3321 Families in American Society: 3 semester hours.

American families in social-historical contexts. Contemporary issues confronting families as social institutions and impact of family interaction dynamics. PREREQ: SOC 1101 or permission of instructor. D

SOC 3330 Sociology of Health and Illness: 3 semester hours.

Sociological examination of health and illness including historical and cultural variations, health care and physician-patient issues. S

SOC 3335 Population and Environment: 3 semester hours.

The scientific study of population and its environmental consequences. D

SOC 3366 The Community: 3 semester hours.

Examines selected theories of community origins, characteristics, structures, boundaries, and change. Analyze methods of studying various aspects of communities. PREREQ: SOC 1101. F

SOC 3368 The Sociology of Religion: 3 semester hours.

Contemporary issues as they relate to religion. The relationship of religion to other social institutions. Religious experience and mysticism. Prophecy and its routinization. Cults and religious dissent. PREREQ: SOC 1101. F

SOC 3399 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hour.

This course is not described in the catalog. The course title and number of credits are announced in the class schedule by the scheduling department. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times. May be repeated

SOC 4402 Proseminar in Sociology: 3 semester hours.

An overview of the field of sociology, with emphasis on the teaching of sociology, orientation to graduate education, major sociological theories, issues, research approaches, and ethical problems in the field. PREREQ: Permission of instructor. D

SOC 4403 Contemporary Social Theory: 3 semester hours.

Survey and appraisal of sociological theories since 1945: structural functionalism, rational choice, conflict, symbolic interactionism, and phenomenology. PREREQ: SOC 3301. S

SOC 4408 Advanced Sociological Methods: 3 semester hours.

Emphasizes advanced techniques in research design, data measurement, and multivariate analysis utilizing computer application. PREREQ: SOC/SOWK 3308 and SOC 3309. AS

SOC 4413 Mind Body and Society: 3 semester hours.

Symbolic interaction and its relation to selfhood, sympathy, illness, sexuality, and addiction; and to groupings like enemies, communities, and associations. PREREQ: SOC 1101. D

SOC 4431 Criminology: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of criminal law, law enforcement, judicial roles and processes, correctional approaches, the criminal offender and societal reactions. Theory and research as applicable to behavior and institutional relations. PREREQ: SOC 1101 or SOC 1102. S

SOC 4436 Elite Deviance and Crime: 3 semester hours.

Explores the types of criminal behaviors engaged in by the American socioeconomic and corporate elite. The course first explores and identifies who this elite is and then examines their ideological and economic history in American society. Specific examples of elite and corporate crime are presented and discussed in class. Equivalent to POLS 4436 and SOWK 4436. F

SOC 4438 Sexual Crimes: 3 semester hours.

Complex relationships of human sexuality to law and crime. A range of sexual attitudes, practices and lifestyles will be discussed in the context of cultural norms, legal parameters and personal expression. Students will be introduced to cultural variations in defining and addressing sexuality and crime. Current theoretical explanations of sexual offending and U.S. social policies and clinical interventions for sexual offenders. Equivalent to SOWK 4438. S

SOC 4462 Power Class and Prestige: 3 semester hours.

Theories and methodology of status systems; the relation of class to the social structure; analysis of class in different societies, with emphasis upon the class system and power. PREREQ: SOC 1101 or permission of instructor. S

SOC 4467 Community Networking Cultivating the Sociological Imagination: 3 semester hours.

Advanced study of the sociology of community through readings, class discussions, lectures, and a community networking internship. S

SOC 4482 Sociology Internship: 1-3 semester hour.

Apply sociological principles in such ways as assisting the supervising professor with a lower-level course, conducting study groups, or small group instruction. Credits not applicable toward the major. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. PREREQ: Permission of instructor; junior status; minimum of 12 hours and 3.0 GPA in Sociology. D

SOC 4483 Independent Problems in Sociology: 1-4 semester hour.

Readings, observations, applied work, or data analysis in content area not offered in our curriculum. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. PREREQ: Permission of the instructor; advanced junior status; minimum of 12 hours and 3.0 GPA in Sociology. D

SOC 4491 Topics in Sociology: 3 semester hours.

Readings, discussion, and preparation of reports on selected topics. May be repeated with different content. D

SOC 4492 Topics in Criminal Justice: 3 semester hours.

Readings, discussion, and preparation of reports on selected topics. May be repeated with different content. D

SOC 4499 Experimental Course: 1-3 semester hour.

This course is not described in the catalog. The course title and number of credits are announced in the class schedule by the scheduling department. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times

Chair and Associate Professor

Hearn

Professors

Hunter

Leavitt

Associate Professors

Jensen-Hart

Assistant Professors

Casey

Christensen

Kim

Thomas

Williams

Affiliate Faculty

Adamcik

Emeriti

Aho

Bryan

Pierson