Counseling

Counseling

Chair and Professor: Kleist

Associate Professors: Crews, Horn, Paulson

Assistant Professors: Astramovich, Coe-Smith, Moody, Stewart, Yates

Clinical Assistant Professor: Singarajah

Adjunct Associate Professor: Schmidt

Adjunct Assistant Professor: Tivis

Adjunct Instructor: Bohecker, Niece

Emeritus Faculty: Allen, Feit, Edgar, Lloyd

Department Mission Statement

The principle mission of the Department of Counseling is to prepare quality counselors for various settings in Idaho and the nation. More specifically, we seek to prepare quality School Counselors for public schools in K-12 settings, Clinical Mental Health Counselors and Marriage, Couple, and Family Counselors for community agencies and other mental health settings, and Student Affairs Counselors for working in college settings such as advising, residence halls, and career centers.

We additionally prepare doctoral level counselor educators and supervisors to work primarily in institutions of higher learning as faculty members in counselor education programs. We believe that it is also our mission to:

  • instill a strong sense of professional identity in students;
  • help students gain an appreciation of the rich knowledge base in counselor education;
  • develop student expertise in the skills of counseling;
  • aid students to become certified and/or licensed;
  • aid students/graduates in their initial job placement;
  • teach and perform research applicable to the practice of counseling; and counselor education and supervision;
  • aid students in understanding the diversity of views and cultures within our profession and the environment in which counselors practice.

The Department of Counseling also has a mission within the Division of Health Sciences, Kasiska School of Health Professions, which is to represent the mental health perspective within the Division and to consult with Division faculty and departments in encouraging a holistic perspective toward health care services.

Counselor Education

Graduate-level preparation for

  1. counselors who seek employment in schools, universities, community mental health, and various other settings, and
  2. college student affairs professionals.

Pre-Counseling and Pre-Student Affairs

Preparation should consist of a broad undergraduate course of study, including some work in psychology (learning and personality theory), sociology, and the communication skills. For those seeking positions in public elementary and secondary schools, state certification requirements should be considered.

Degree Programs

Degree programs offered by the department include Doctor of Philosophy, Educational Specialist, and Master of Counseling. Majors are available in Counselor Education and Counseling (Ph.D.); Counseling (Ed.S.); Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling (M.COUN.); Clinical Mental Health Counseling (M.COUN.); School Counseling (M.COUN.); and Student Affairs Counseling (M.COUN.).

Accreditation

The program for preparation of school counselors is credentialed by the State of Idaho.

The Counselor Education programs are approved by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) as follows: Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling (M.COUN.), Clinical Mental Health Counseling (M.COUN.), School Counseling (M.COUN.), Student Affairs Counseling (M.COUN.), and Counselor Education and Counseling (Ph.D.).

Progression in Clinical Track Classes - Master's

Students who obtain a final grade of 2.7 (B-), or lower, in any clinical track class will be dismissed from the Department of Counseling. Students who withdraw from any clinical track class, without the prior approval of the department, will be dismissed from the program. Students can appeal their dismissal from the program through Departmental policy. The Counseling Department utilizes ISU's Appeal Policy.

Departmental Dismissal Policies

Master's Degree Retention and Dismissal Policy

Department of Counseling faculty are confident that each student admitted has the potential to be successful in graduate study. Success in course work, clinical practice, case presentations, comprehensive exams, oral exam, and enactment of the core dispositions are examples of student's progress toward completing a degree in the Department of Counseling. However, admission into the counseling program does not guarantee success. Faculty expect students to fully engage in all aspects of the learning environment, showing openness to new experiences and risk taking necessary to develop as a person and professional counselor. The student’s major advisor plays an integral role in giving feedback to a student thus providing opportunities for continued growth and development. Engagement in all aspects of the educational experiences developed by faculty in the Department will increase the probability of successful completion of the program.

The Department of Counseling faculty members have a professional responsibility to serve as gatekeepers for the counseling profession. Counseling is a discipline that requires active and complex gatekeeping to protect the public welfare of our communities. In particular, gatekeeping refers to the responsibility of all counselors, including counselor educators and student counselors, to intervene with counselor trainees, supervisees, professional colleagues, and supervisors who engage in behavior that could threaten the welfare of those receiving counseling services. This responsibility is mandated in the ethical standards of both the American Counseling Association (ACA) and the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC) by specifying that counselors must act to rectify the problematic condition through appropriate organizational and professional channels (ACA, 2014, Section F.5.; NBCC, 2005, Section A; McAdams & Foster, 2009).

Faculty, site supervisors, and doctoral students systematically discuss and evaluate students’ progress in the program. When impediments are identified the student will be informed either verbally or in writing. Impediments may include, but are not limited to, those offered by Frame and Stevens-Smith (1995):

  1. inability to be open, flexible, positive, and cooperative
  2. unwilling to accept and use feedback
  3. unaware of impact on others
  4. inability to deal with conflict and accept personal responsibility
  5. inability to express feelings effectively and appropriately

The above examples are also found in the description of the Core Dispositions (see page 6 Student Handbook). If others (i.e., faculty, doctoral level supervisors, and site supervisors) have made similar observations, the Department Chairperson, major advisor, or other faculty will initiate a meeting with the student to discuss the apparent impediment to progress. Remedies and expected behavior changes will be discussed and outlined in verbal and/or written form.

Students will be given specific feedback on the nature of their impediment(s) as well as steps to remove this barrier(s) to progress when appropriate. In many instances a Professional Progression Plan (PPP) will be crafted to provide clear and specific ways the student can improve and continue to progress in the program. However, in more extreme cases (e.g., student poses a potential harm to self or others), faculty may choose to remove the student from the program without a PPP. 

The PPP represents a formal agreement between the Department and student who has been identified as having impediments to their progress as a counselor in training. Upon receipt of the PPP the student will review the plan and provide their signature indicating an understanding of the requirements expected and as agreement to meet the requirements described within. A student who chooses not to sign the PPP should understand this will cause immediate dismissal from the program and familiarize themselves with the appeals process.

Dismissal of a master’s student can be initiated in a variety of circumstances including, but not limited to, the following:

  • Dismissal will occur when students violate the criteria established by the Graduate School (See Appeals and Dismissals in the Graduate Catalog).

Dismissal for academic or clinical deficiency will occur when a student:

  1. Earns a B- or below in COUN 6696 Prepracticum Counseling Techniques,
  2. OR COUN 6621 Counseling Ethics,
  3. OR six credits at or below 2.7 (B- or below),
  4. OR below a 3.0 GPA (B),
  5. Or when students earn less than 3.0 (B) in Practicum COUN 6697 or Internship COUN 6698.

In addition, students earning a 2.7 (B-) or below in clinical coursework must petition and gain approval from the graduate faculty in the department in order to continue in the program. The Department of Counseling follows the Appeal Process detailed in the Appeals and Dismissals section of the ISU Graduate Catalog.

Due to the nature of the program, students can be dismissed for nonacademic concerns.  The American Counseling Association Code of Ethics (2014) requires counselor educators provide remediation and/or dismissal from counseling programs when “they become aware of limitations that might impede performance” or when students are unable to demonstrate “they can provide competent counseling services to a range of diverse clients (6.f.b.).” As stated above, gatekeeping is an ethical mandate for counselor educators and designed to protect counselors in training and their current and future clients. Nonacademic concerns that could lead to dismissal include, but are not limited to, academic dishonesty, ethical violations, lack of professional comportment, personal attitudes or value systems that conflict with effective counseling relationships, and personal concerns or psychopathology.

Academic Dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating and plagiarism. For the complete statement on academic dishonesty, please refer to the Academic Dishonesty section of the ISU Graduate Catalog. Examples of ethical violations include, but are not limited to, the improper use of technology, failure to secure informed consent, and breach of confidentiality. Lack of professional comportment, includes but is not limited to, a lack of engagement in course requirements, issues within interpersonal relationships with peers, doctoral students and faculty, and inappropriate use of power with clients and other students. The faculty believe the enactment of the core dispositions embodies the values of the counseling profession and deficiencies in these areas could lead to dismissal. All students are encouraged to seek counseling and attend to their mental health. A student’s unwillingness to attend to intra- or inter-personal impediments contributing to impairment may lead to dismissal.

Dismissal Process Flow Chart

Process is continuous from start to graduation.

Dismissal Process Flow Chart

In addition to the ACA Code of Ethics, the Department of Counseling adheres to Idaho State University policies with regard to student conduct and academic dishonesty. For more information about university expectations of student conduct, see the Idaho State University Handbook located on the Division of Student Affairs website: http://www2.isu.edu/studenta/.

Doctor of Philosophy in Counselor Education and Counseling

The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) is the highest university award given in recognition of completion of academic preparation for professional practice in counseling. Candidates are provided primarily with courses and practicum/internship experiences that will be instrumental in assisting them to function more effectively as professional counselor educators, as counseling practitioners, and as researchers.

Goals

The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Counselor Education and Counseling is designed to prepare counselor educators for work in counselor education programs and for work in supervisory roles in university counseling centers and other counseling sites. The major emphasis of this program is to prepare graduates for careers in university teaching in counseling programs.

Counselor education and counseling students at Idaho State University will be:

  1. Prepared to teach courses in counseling skills and counseling theories.
  2. Prepared to supervise counselors and counseling students who are providing individual, group, and/or marital, couple and family counseling.
  3. Prepared to teach selected courses in one or more of the CACREP major areas.
  4. Prepared to teach selected courses in the general CACREP common core.
  5. Prepared to evaluate counselor education programs and counseling sites.
  6. Knowledgeable of professional issues in the counselor education and counseling fields.
  7. Knowledgeable of ethical issues and practices of counselor education and counseling.
  8. Experienced in developing and conducting research.
  9. Experienced in writing for professional publication.
  10. Experienced in the advisement and mentoring of Master of Counseling students.
  11. Knowledgeable and skilled in providing advanced clinical counseling skills.
  12. Knowledgeable of the sociological manifestations of cultural diversity.

Admission Criteria

The student must apply to, and meet all criteria for, admission to the Graduate School. In addition, persons applying for admission to the doctoral program in Counselor Education and Counseling must meet the following criteria for selection. Applicants must have:

  1. a master's degree from a CACREP accredited program and be licensed as a counselor in Idaho or a state with comparable requirements OR a master's degree in counseling and be a Nationally Certified Counselor and apply for an Idaho Counseling License upon admission to the doctoral program OR a master's degree in counseling, one year of full time post-master's degree counseling experience, graduate coursework curriculum requirements in all of the CACREP common core areas, and be a Nationally Certified Counselor or Idaho Licensed Counselor. (Persons who do not meet these requirements may be considered for admission as Classified (w/PR) while removing deficiencies in coursework and/or credentials.);
  2. taken the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Miller Analogies Test (MAT). Preference will be given to scale scores of 40 percentile or more;
  3. a professional resume;
  4. a one-page statement of post-doctoral career objectives;
  5. submitted three (3) letters of recommendation;
  6. completed both Idaho State University Graduate School and Department of Counseling application forms; and
  7. completed an on-campus interview by the Department of Counseling Admissions Committee.

The Admissions Committee will make the final decision regarding admission. This decision will be based on grade point and test score ranking, as well as on the committee's impression of the applicant's interpersonal style and compatibility of personality with the program's training philosophy, and his or her writing sample.

Selection Schedule for Doctoral Study

Application forms will be available for download after August 15. The application can be found at http://www.isu.edu/hpcounsl/09phdapp.shtml. Applications must be postmarked by December 15. Selection of applicants for on-campus (ISU-Pocatello) interviews will be announced by early January. Notification of successful applicants for admission and alternates will be announced by approximately late January. A maximum of 5-6 students are admitted to the program each year (ISU-Pocatello, 4; ISU-Meridian, 2). Classes begin in the Fall semester of each year.

Master's Degree Curriculum Review

Doctoral students who have earned their master’s degree from a 60 credit hour CACREP accredited program will be assumed to have entry level knowledge in core and major course areas. Those not graduating from a 60 credit hour CACREP accredited program will have their transcripts evaluated by a faculty committee to determine knowledge base deficiencies. A remediation plan of study will be developed and approved by the faculty as necessary. This review will take place prior to the beginning of the first semester. The transcript review will verify content of the following course comparable to the CACREP Core Areas in one of the four (4) counseling specializations.

Specialization Areas

Each doctoral student must complete at least one of the CACREP specializations. In Meridian, it could be challenging to meet the requirements of other specializations except Clinical Mental Health Counseling due to the limited availability of co-teaching opportunities. However, it is possible and has been done. If interested in doing so, please consult with your major advisor. Upon completion of the CACREP specialization requirements, the Program Requirements Verification form must be signed by the student's major advisor.

Each specialization requires competence in the following:

  1. Skills and Practices
  2. Supervision
  3. Teaching
  4. Knowledge

The major advisor, in conjunction with the program coordinator for the specialization and/or other faculty members, direct the student’s study to achieve this competence. Students will develop a portfolio demonstrating competence in the specialization area. Aside from obtaining licensure, students may tailor all their teaching experiences to uniquely fit their interests and professional goals. Plans are primarily negotiated with the major advisor and in some cases may require approval from the coordinator for that specialization area with major advisor and program (i.e., specialization) coordinator approval. Application for licensure as a LPC in Idaho should be submitted by beginning of the second year.

Admission to Candidacy

Each student demonstrating an adequate foundation for doctoral study, based upon the selection criteria and the master’s degree curriculum review, may apply for degree candidacy. The application for candidacy will include:

  1. A course of study designed to remove entry level deficiencies as indicated by the master’s degree curriculum review;
  2. An approved plan for completion of specialization areas in both core and major areas; and
  3. An approved final program of study.

After receiving the written approval of the major professor and a second graduate faculty committee member from the department, the application may then be submitted to the department for approval and the appointment of a third departmental committee member. The fourth committee member is non-departmental graduate faculty selected from the Division of Health Sciences or the university at large. The fifth committee member is the Graduate Faculty Representative (GFR).

Comprehensive Examination

The comprehensive examination is five days in length and is scheduled the first week of February.

Rationale for our Comprehensive Exam structure: The majority of positions advertised in counselor education require applicants to have a record of scholarship and publication. It is in the best interest of our students to provide them with not only a meaningful and rigorous capstone experience of the comprehensive exam, but also an opportunity to submit their work for publication.

  1. 5 days, 2 Position Papers on the following topic areas:
    1. Day 1: CACREP Core areas
    2. Students will receive 4-6 prompts (i.e., topics, questions, or issue statements) from which to select one for development into a manuscript for submission. Students will have Monday and Tuesday to complete a draft manuscript.
    3. Day 3: Specialty Area and Professional Issues
    4. Students will receive 4-6 prompts (i.e., topics, questions, or issue statements) from which to select one for development into a manuscript for submission. Students will have Wednesday and Thursday to complete a draft manuscript.
    5. Friday can be used to polish your manuscripts for submission to the faculty editorial board. Manuscripts must be submitted by 5:00 p.m. on Friday.
  2. Format and protocol:
    1. All are open book and open note. Access to library resources, or similar, via the internet are allowed.
    2. This requires a great deal of familiarity with and understanding of the literature in the areas covered in order for the students to know what to research and where to find supportive literature for their manuscripts.
    3. The intent is for students to have two submissions for publication at the end of the comprehensive examination process.
    4. Scoring rubrics will follow an adapted CES editorial board form.
    5. At the end of Friday, students will turn in their manuscripts which will include a title, an abstract, correct APA formatting and reference citations, as well as a reference page. At the end of each day the developing manuscript will be kept on a thumb drive (or more current digital format) in a secured area in a faculty member's office.
    6. The Faculty Editorial Boards will review each submission and offer feedback and edits to be incorporated into the manuscripts.
      1. This process will take place over the course of one week.
    7. After Faculty Editorial Board review, the students must incorporate the feedback and resubmit their manuscripts to the faculty within one week of receipt of feedback in electronic form.
    8. The Faculty Editorial Board will then either approve the students' manuscripts for journal submission or return as not ready for submission. An "approve for submission" rating must be received in order to "pass" comprehensive exams.
      1. Should further editing be required by the Faculty Editorial Board, the student will be given a pre-determined amount of time in which to make these final changes and then re-submit to faculty for determination of pass or fail for submission.
    9. Each manuscript must then be submitted to a journal from the ACA family of journals or other counseling related journals acceptable to the student's doctoral committee. The students must provide their committee with acknowledgement of their submission from the journal in order to advance to doctoral candidate status.

Dissertation

After the student is admitted to degree candidacy, the dissertation proposal and preliminary research that the candidate and first two committee members have agreed upon will be presented to the complete five-member committee for recommendations and approval. Following the approval of the proposal and the completion of the comprehensive examination, the candidate is authorized to proceed with the dissertation in preparation for a final oral examination defense. The final defense is open to any member of the graduate faculty directing a request through the Dean of the Graduate School and the chair of the committee.

Residence

Following the bachelor's degree, each applicant must complete the equivalent of ten semesters of graduate study including the master's degree and three semesters of doctoral internship. At least six of the semesters must be at the doctoral level and four of these must be consecutive semesters (not including summer sessions) of full-time graduate study on campus. Students are strongly encouraged to attend all six of these semesters on a full-time basis.

Continuous Enrollment

Following admission to doctoral study, the student must register for course work, practicum, internship, independent study, or dissertation credit each semester until the completion of the degree.

Required Courses
COUN 7701Advanced Statistics2
COUN 7702Advanced Research and Experimental Design2
COUN 7703Qualitative Research2
COUN 7704Qualitative Methodology and Analysis2
COUN 7705Instructional Theory for Counselor Educators4
COUN 7710Practicum in College Teaching2
COUN 7712Advanced Psychological Testing and Assessment2
COUN 7724Advanced Diversity Issues3
COUN 7727Advanced Theories of Counseling3
COUN 7774Advanced Group Procedures3
COUN 7790Supervision in Counselor Education3
COUN 8800Research and Professional Issues2
COUN 8801Doctoral Career Development1
COUN 8802Scholarship in Counselor Education1
COUN 8848Doctoral Counseling Practicum2
COUN 8848LDoctoral Counseling Practicum Lab0
COUN 8849Doctoral Internship1-18
COUN 8849LDoctoral Internship Lab0
COUN 8850Dissertation1-12
Suggested Electives
COUN 7758Independent Problems1-4
 

Educational Specialist Degree

Education Specialist in Counseling

The Ed.S. program is designed for persons who have completed a master's degree in counseling and wish to increase their skill s for advanced certification requirements or other professional objectives.

Admission Requirements

The applicant must:

  1. Hold a master’s degree in counseling from a CACREP accredited school counseling program or equivalent CACREP course work.
  2. Submit Graduate School application forms and application fee.
  3. Submit departmental application form and application fee by specified application date.
  4. Submit three (3) letters of recommendation; two (2) letters must be from Department of Counseling faculty who agree to serve on the graduate committee.
  5. Have a minimum of two (2) years of work experience as a school counselor (post-master's), and be currently employed as a certified school counselor.
  6. Be recommended for admission by the Department of Counseling Admissions Committee.

Degree Requirements

The student must complete a minimum of 70 credit hours of course work (including the master's degree) and a case study. All post-master's degree course work must be approved in advance by Department of Counseling faculty. A minimum grade point average of 3.0 is required over all course work taken in the Ed.S. program. An oral examination is required that involves the presentation of a case study and demonstration of advanced counseling skills.

Major Requirements

At the post-master's degree Ed.S. level, all course work must be in Counseling-related areas and must include:

OLP 5501Foundations of Human Resource Development3
COUN 6693Supervision of Counselors1
COUN 6694Psychodiagnosis and Psychotropic Drugs3
COUN 7723Advanced Vocational Theory3
COUN 7759Ed.S Internship3
Total Hours13
 

Educational Specialist Case Study

The case study presented during the oral examination reflects (both in written and video form) advanced counseling skills and theoretical orientation. It reflects therapeutic goals, client themes and counseling techniques necessary to facilitate client growth.

Time Requirement

All requirements for the Ed.S. must be completed within a period of seven (7) years from the date of completion of the first post-master's degree course to be applied toward the degree.

Master of Counseling (M.COUN)

Majors:

Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling

Clinical Mental Health Counseling

School Counseling

Student Affairs Counseling

Goals

The general objective of the Master of Counseling (M.COUN.) degree is to prepare students to be professional counselors. The Department of Counseling faculty believe that the development of a strong professional identity, a rich knowledge base, and expertise in the skills of counseling are essential to functioning as a professional in each counseling setting.

The Master of Counseling degree is designed to be the strong foundation upon which graduates enter a lifetime career in the helping professions. This program prepares counselors to respond to the multitude of societal changes, and to the ever-expanding counseling profession. In addition to knowledge and experience in the following eight common-core areas, graduates also have specialized knowledge and skills as identified in the objectives of the Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling, Clinical Mental Health Counseling, School Counseling, and Student Affairs Counseling majors.

Curricular Objectives

  1. Students will have knowledge of Human Growth and Development in order to understand the nature and needs of persons at all developmental levels and in multicultural contexts.
  2. Students will have knowledge of Social and Cultural Foundations to be effective in a multicultural and diverse society.
  3. Students will be knowledgeable and skillful in Counseling and Consultation processes.
  4. Students will be knowledgeable about group development, dynamics, counseling theory, group counseling methods, and group work approaches.
  5. Students will be knowledgeable and understand career development and related factors.
  6. Students will understand and be knowledgeable about individual and group approaches to assessment and evaluation.
  7. Students will be knowledgeable about various research methods and statistical analysis needs assessment and program evaluation.
  8. Students will be knowledgeable about the profession of counseling including history, organizational structures, ethics, standards, and credentialing.

Student Professional Objectives:

In addition to the above curricular objectives, the Department of Counseling has program-wide objectives. These include:

  1. School counseling students will obtain certification as school counselors.
  2. Students in all majors (Clinical Mental Health Counseling, Marriage Couple and Family Counseling, School Counseling, and Student Affairs Counseling) will obtain the appropriate state licensure as professional counselors.

Admission Requirements

Admission into the counseling program is competitive. A preset number of students will be admitted, according to faculty resources. The Admissions Committee will make the final recommendation regarding admission based on grade point and test score rankings, as well as on the committee's impression of the applicant's interpersonal style and compatibility of personality with the program's training philosophy, and on the student's written statement.

The applicant must:

  1. Have a bachelor’s degree from a college or university accredited in the United States, or its equivalent from a school in another country. (Must complete degree before onset of classes in the Fall semester in year of acceptance.)
  2. Meet the guidelines for admission set forth by the Graduate School and the Department of Counseling. Those individuals meeting both criteria will be invited for an interview. The minimum master's level standards are:
    1. GPA                      Standardized Test

                                          (last 60 credits)

      3.0 to 4.0              40th Percentile on at least one area of the GRE or 40th Percentile on the MAT

      2.5 to 2.999           Combined Verbal and Quantitative (V + Q) score of 300 on GRE or 45th Percentile on the MAT

      Below 2.499            No Admission

      The method for calculating an admission GPA is based on the last 60± semester undergraduate credits

      (90 ± quarter credits).

  3. Prospective students are expected to come to campus (Pocatello or Meridian) for an interview. Selected applicants will be interviewed by the Department of Counseling Admissions Committee as part of the admissions procedure. Ultimately, one's GPA and test scores qualify one to take part in the interview process.
  4. Submit three (3) letters of recommendation from individuals who have knowledge of the applicant’s academic capabilities, work performance, professional potential, and character.
  5. Submit Graduate School forms and application fee.
  6. Submit departmental application forms and application fee.
  7. Read and sign the Department of Counseling Conditions for Admission/Retention/Dismissal form.

Only applicants who have submitted all application materials on or before the application deadline will have their material reviewed by the Admissions Committee to determine status as a competitive, qualified applicant (incomplete, late, or inaccurate files/forms will not be reviewed). Due to the competition for limited seats in the Master of Counseling program, satisfactory completion of the entry level requirements does not guarantee acceptance.

Selected applicants will be interviewed by the Department of Counseling Admissions Committee as part of the admissions procedure. The Admissions Committee will make the final decision regarding admission. This decision will be based on grade point and test score rankings as well as the Committee’s impression of the applicant’s interpersonal style and compatibility of personality with the program’s training philosophy.

Selection Schedule

After August 15, application forms are available for download at http://www.isu.edu/hpcounsl.

ISU-Pocatello

Application review begins January 15, and continues until all seats are filled. Interviews are tentatively scheduled for early February. Notification of admission decisions will be announced approximately mid-February. A maximum of 20-25 students are admitted to the Master of Counseling program each year at ISU-Pocatello. Classes begin the fall semester of each year.

ISU-Meridian

Application review begins January 15 and continues until all seats are filled. Interviews are tentatively scheduled for mid-February. Notification of admission decisions will be announced approximately April 1. A maximum of 10-12 students are admitted to the Master of Counseling program each year at ISU-Meridian. Classes begin the fall semester of each year.

If the January 15 deadline has passed, please contact the Department of Counseling. A secondary admission process may be conducted.

Classified w/Performance Requirements Status

Students who meet the undergraduate grade point average of 3.0 or higher for all upper division undergraduate classes but have not received their scores for the GRE or MAT or are registered to take one of these examinations at the next possible testing may be admitted Classified (w/PR) status, and may be considered for openings not filled by Classified applicants in the Department of Counseling program.

Students must request a change of status from Classified (w/PR) status to Classified status upon completion of their first semester of graduate study. The change from Classified (w/PR) to Classified status must be approved by the Department of Counseling and the Dean of the Graduate School.

Unclassified Status

Our Department's Professional Development Workshops do, periodically, offer workshops lengthy enough to count as 1 or 2 class credits.

Approval of Master's Degree

Final Program of Study

A student who has been admitted to the Master of Counseling (M.COUN.). Program may submit a final program of study following the completion of COUN 6621 Professional Orientation and Ethics, COUN 6627 Conceptualizing Counseling Theory, COUN 6696 Practicum Counseling Techniques and during the semester in which COUN 6697 Practicum in Counseling is being completed. The final program of study must include all course work required to complete the selected M.COUN. major and must be approved by two counseling faculty members who have graduate faculty status (one of whom will serve as committee chair). Prior to the semester of the proposed graduation, the final program of study must receive the approval of a majority of the Counseling graduate faculty.

General Requirements

For the Master of Counseling (M.COUN.) degree the student is required to complete the equivalent of at least four full semesters of resident graduate study beyond the bachelor's degree. For the Clinical Mental Health Counseling, Marriage, Couple, & Family Counseling, School Counseling, and Student Affairs Counseling majors, a minimum of 60 semester hours must be completed in the Core and Major Course Requirements.

Core Course Requirements
COUN 6611Applied Statistics and Research3
COUN 6612Psychological Testing for Counselors2
COUN 6621Professional Orientation and Ethics2
COUN 6623Lifestyle and Career Development2
COUN 6624Cultural Counseling2
COUN 6625Crisis Interventions and Trauma Counseling2
COUN 6627Conceptualizing Counseling Theory2
COUN 6628Applications of Counseling Theory2
COUN 6630Addictions Counseling2
COUN 6660Theories of Family and Couple Counseling3
COUN 6676Small Group Activity1
COUN 6677Group Counseling Techniques3
COUN 6694Psychodiagnosis and Psychotropic Drugs3
COUN 6696Practicum Counseling Techniques3
Major Course Requirements
Major in Marriage, Couple and Family Counseling
COUN 6661Issues in Family Counseling3
COUN 6664Family Assessment2
COUN 6665Advanced Family Systems Theory2
COUN 6697Practicum in Counseling2
COUN 6697LPracticum in Counseling Lab0
COUN 6698Internship in Counseling18
COUN 6698LInternship in Counseling Lab0
Major in Clinical Mental Health Counseling
COUN 6690Foundations of Clinical Mental Health Counseling2
COUN 6691Professional Issues in Clinical Mental Health Counseling2
COUN 6692Continuum of Care in Clinical Mental Health Counseling2
COUN 6697Practicum in Counseling2
COUN 6697LPracticum in Counseling Lab0
COUN 6698Internship in Counseling18
COUN 6698LInternship in Counseling Lab0
Major in School Counseling
COUN 6638Foundations of School Counseling3
COUN 6639Application of School Counseling Foundations3
COUN 6697Practicum in Counseling (school setting preferred)2
COUN 6697LPracticum in Counseling Lab0
COUN 6698Internship in Counseling18
COUN 6698LInternship in Counseling Lab0
Major in Student Affairs Counseling
COUN 6680Foundations of Student Affairs3
COUN 6683Administration of Student Affairs Practice3
COUN 6697Practicum in Counseling (student affairs setting preferred)2
COUN 6697LPracticum in Counseling Lab0
COUN 6698Internship in Counseling (student affairs setting preferred)18
COUN 6698LInternship in Counseling Lab0
 

Requirements for the Idaho Counseling License

The Idaho Counseling License requirements include:

  1. Master's degree in a counseling major (any one of the four M.COUN. majors meets this requirement),
  2. 60 graduate credits in a planned counseling program (including the courses in one of the M.COUN. majors),
  3. 1000 hours of counseling experience supervised by an approved supervisor listed on the Idaho Board of Occupational Licenses-Counselor and Therapist website (including the hours received as part of a M.COUN. program), and
  4. A passing score on the Idaho Counseling License Examination (or the National Board for Certified Counselors Examination).

How to Read Course Descriptions

Courses

COUN 5550 Peer Counseling Seminar: 1-2 semester hours.

Supervised experience in assisting another student. Students meet out of class on a weekly contact basis. Course provides ongoing training for the peer counselors. May be repeated up to 6 credits. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.

COUN 5584 Guidance Principles and Practices: 3 semester hours.

Survey of the various guidance practices in secondary education. Each service is discussed from the point of view of its role in the total educational program.

COUN 5585 Independent Problems: 1-2 semester hours.

Individual work under staff guidance. Field and/or library research on specific educational problems of interest to majors in education. Experience in research composition. May be repeated. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.

COUN 5590 Introduction to Counseling Services: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to the counseling profession, including an overview of the curriculum, experience and skills needed to be a successful licensed counselor. Specific, evaluated graduate-level activities and/or performances are identified in the course syllabus.

COUN 5591 Seminar: 1-3 semester hours.

Critical analysis of the literature in one or more areas. Limited enrollment. May be graded S/U or on a letter-grade basis in separate sections. May be repeated up to 8 credits. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.

COUN 5594 Elementary School Guidance: 2 semester hours.

Study of (1) the function of guidance in relation to children's needs; (2) principles and techniques of elementary school guidance; (3) analysis of representative programs of guidance in the elementary schools; and (4) research related to elementary school guidance and resulting trends.

COUN 5597 Prof Ed Development Topics: 1-3 semester hours.

A course for practicing professionals aimed at the development and improvement of skills. May not be applied to graduate degrees. May be repeated. Must be graded S/U.

COUN 5598P Prof Development Workshop: 3 semester hours.

New methods and opportunities to enhance and supplement skills. Subject to the approval of the Dean of the student's college, a maximum of eight credits earned in workshops may be applied toward a degree; students taking the courses only for personal development may choose the 0-credit option; those seeking professional development must choose a for-credit option.

COUN 5599 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

This is an experimental course. The course title and number of credits are noted by course section and announced in the class schedule by the scheduling department. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times. May be repeated.

COUN 6606 Family Violence: 2 semester hours.

Delineates the implications for assessment and treatment of the family with violence. Topics of physical abuse, sexual abuse and psychological/emotional abuse of adults and children within a family structure will be addressed. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program or permission of instructor.

COUN 6607 The Family and Mental Illness: 2 semester hours.

Addresses therapeutic and community support that enhances the family unit as the primary care system. Mental illness as it relates to the family system is presented. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program or permission of instructor.

COUN 6608 The Family and Chemical Dependency: 2 semester hours.

Addresses family systems under the influence of addictions with primary emphasis on alcohol dependency. Models and patterns of addictions will be examined. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program or permission of instructor.

COUN 6609 The Family and the Aged: 2 semester hours.

Emphasizes the impact of aging on family systems from an economic, emotional, social, spiritual, and physiological perspective. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program or permission of instructor.

COUN 6611 Applied Statistics and Research: 3 semester hours.

Basic understanding of applied statistics. Procedures for designing, interpreting, critiquing, and presenting professional research. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program or permission of instructor.

COUN 6612 Psychological Testing for Counselors: 2 semester hours.

An overview of the standardized tests most commonly used by counselors. In addition to learning the underlying concepts of standardized testing, students will also be taught how to select and use tests appropriate to their proposed work settings. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program or permission of instructor.

COUN 6613 Basic Projective Techniques: 2 semester hours.

Projective theory and its relationship to psychoanalysis, dynamic theory, and learning theory. Techniques including problems of clinical practicality, prediction of behavior, and personality assessment. Practical experiences available in laboratory courses. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program or permission of instructor.

COUN 6619 Individual Intelligence Testing: 3 semester hours.

Supervised practice in administering, scoring, and interpreting the results of individual intelligence tests. Each section limited to 6 students. PREREQ: Admission to Master of Counseling Program, COUN 6612 or permission of instructor.

COUN 6621 Professional Orientation and Ethics: 2 semester hours.

Introduction to profession of counseling: history, accreditation, licensure, organizational structure, advocacy, and use of technology. Ethical problems in counseling with specific attention given to the American Counseling Association Code of Ethics. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program or permission of instructor.

COUN 6623 Lifestyle and Career Development: 2 semester hours.

Career development theories and decision-making models for counselors including career resources and materials. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program.

COUN 6624 Cultural Counseling: 2 semester hours.

Students will explore issues of diversity, social justice, and multiculturalism including race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation and other cultural factors relevant to multiculturally competent counseling. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program. COREQ: COUN 6621 and COUN 6696 or permission of instructor.

COUN 6625 Crisis Interventions and Trauma Counseling: 2 semester hours.

Current information, skills, and strategies for counseling interventions specific to crises, disasters, and other trauma-causing events. Topics include: triage, assessment and diagnosis, individual and community resiliency, emergency preparedness, multicultural considerations, interagency cooperation, and "psychological first aid." PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program or permission of instructor.

COUN 6627 Conceptualizing Counseling Theory: 2 semester hours.

The conceptual study of selected counseling theories related to historical development, personality development, client maturation, and learning theory. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling program or permission of instructor.

COUN 6628 Applications of Counseling Theory: 2 semester hours.

The applied study of selected counseling theories with emphasis on the evolution of maladjustment, process of change, and appropriate interventions for generating change. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling program.

COUN 6630 Addictions Counseling: 2 semester hours.

Acquaint students with current theories of addiction, recovery, and relapse prevention as well as effective strategies and techniques in working with clients with addictions. The course will explore public policies on local, state, and national levels with regard to addiction services. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling program or permission of instructor.

COUN 6638 Foundations of School Counseling: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the school counseling profession, developmental program models and the roles of the professional school counselor. Special focus will be placed on current literature, cultural considerations, philosophical assumptions, key concepts, techniques, practical applications, recent legislation, and consultation. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program or permission of instructor.

COUN 6639 Application of School Counseling Foundations: 3 semester hours.

This school counseling class prepares students to identify and work with specific populations of youth-at-risk and their communities. Special focus will be placed on current literature, cultural considerations, philosophical assumptions, key concepts, techniques, and practical applications for the K-12 school counselor. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program or permission of instructor.

COUN 6650 Thesis: 1-9 semester hours.

Thesis Credit. 1-9 credits. May be repeated. Graded S/U. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program or permission of instructor.

COUN 6651 Masters Paper: 3 semester hours.

A paper involving extensive familiarity with research findings written under the supervision of a faculty member in the department. May be repeated. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program or permission of instructor.

COUN 6652 Specialist Paper: 3 semester hours.

A paper involving extensive familiarity with research findings under the supervision of a faculty member of the department. May be repeated. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program or permission of instructor.

COUN 6658 Independent Problems: 1-3 semester hours.

Individual work under staff guidance. Field and/or library research on specific educational problems. Experience in research composition. May be repeated up to 6 credits. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program or the Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Counseling Program or the ED.S. in Counseling Program or permission of instructor.

COUN 6659 Seminar: 1-3 semester hours.

Critical analysis of the literature in one or more areas of education. Enrollment limited. May be repeated up to 8 credits. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.

COUN 6660 Theories of Family and Couple Counseling: 3 semester hours.

The study of the development of the family counseling field and the issues and theories related to its practice. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program or permission of instructor.

COUN 6661 Issues in Family Counseling: 3 semester hours.

Examination of contemporary family issues and challenges, parenting issues, and the effects these challenges place on family dynamics and family counseling. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program or permission of instructor.

COUN 6664 Family Assessment: 2 semester hours.

Introduction to family assessment models and instruments as well as evaluation of programs/agencies providing family counseling. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program.

COUN 6665 Advanced Family Systems Theory: 2 semester hours.

Advanced theoretical study with emphasis on researched applications of family counseling. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program.

COUN 6669 Family and Couple Counseling Practicum: 3 semester hours.

Practicum experience counseling families and couples. Graded S/U. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program, COUN 6660, COUN 6697, or permission of instructor.

COUN 6676 Small Group Activity: 1 semester hour.

Designed to give direct experiences as a group participant and provide preparation for COUN 6677. Graded S/U. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program or permission of instructor.

COUN 6677 Group Counseling Techniques: 3 semester hours.

Essential research, selected group development and therapy theories, leadership orientations and strategies, structural group dynamics, and applications. Skills development in a laboratory setting. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program.

COUN 6680 Foundations of Student Affairs: 3 semester hours.

History, philosophy, purpose, and function of student affairs practice including review of "The Student Personnel Point of View," theories of student development, and current trends. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program or permission of instructor.

COUN 6683 Administration of Student Affairs Practice: 3 semester hours.

Leadership and management theories and practice in higher education and student services. Essential research, consultation, good practices, and assessment techniques for all student populations and services. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program.

COUN 6687 Field Work in Personnel Services: 1-2 semester hours.

Observation and learning the duties performed by the persons in the field work setting. A combination of fifty hours of experience and supervision equals one hour of academic credit. May be repeated. Graded S/U. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program or permission of instructor.

COUN 6689 Internship in Student Personnel: 3-12 semester hours.

A combination of fifty hours of experience and supervision equals one hour of academic credit. May be repeated. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program or permission of instructor.

COUN 6690 Foundations of Clinical Mental Health Counseling: 2 semester hours.

Orientation to the professional foundation of clinical mental health counseling for individuals, couples, and families across the lifespan. Topics include history and philosophy, ethics, professional roles and functions, professionalism, community systems and mental health, identity, and diversity within clinical mental health counseling. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program or permission of instructor.

COUN 6691 Professional Issues in Clinical Mental Health Counseling: 2 semester hours.

This course will provide current information and strategies for counseling issues specific to clinical mental health counseling. Topics include advocacy, public policy, administration and finance, and practice privileges. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program.

COUN 6692 Continuum of Care in Clinical Mental Health Counseling: 2 semester hours.

The course will address philosophical and contextual elements of clinical mental health counseling. Topics include the wellness model, prevention, diagnosis in context, treatment modalities, delivery systems, and best practices for clinical mental health counselors. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program or permission of instructor.

COUN 6693 Supervision of Counselors: 1 semester hour.

The study of current practices used in the clinical supervision of counselors. Current literature will be reviewed as well as standards for supervision which have been established by accrediting bodies and professional associations. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program or the ED.S. in Counseling Program or permission of the instructor.

COUN 6694 Psychodiagnosis and Psychotropic Drugs: 3 semester hours.

Psychological classification systems, mental status evaluations, and the use of psychotropic drugs in treatment programs. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program.

COUN 6696 Practicum Counseling Techniques: 3 semester hours.

The study and practice of counseling techniques including micro-counseling and role-playing. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program.

COUN 6697 Practicum in Counseling: 2 semester hours.

Supervised counseling experience. A combination of fifty hours of experience and supervision equals one hour of academic credit. Each section limited to 5 students. May be repeated to four credits. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program. COREQ: COUN 6697L.

COUN 6697L Practicum in Counseling Lab: 0 semester hours.

Group supervision of students working in the field during their internship experience. Supervision is provided on a weekly basis and thus the units of instruction are devised as tutorial experience based on the student's developmental needs. Graded S/U. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program. COREQ: COUN 6697.

COUN 6698 Internship in Counseling: 1-18 semester hours.

A combination of fifty hours of experience and supervision equals one hour of academic credit. May be repeated for a maximum of 18 credits. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program.

COUN 6698L Internship in Counseling Lab: 0 semester hours.

Group supervision of students working in the field during their internship experience. Supervision is provided on a weekly basis and thus the units of instruction are devised as a tutorial experience based on the student's developmental needs. Graded S/U. PREREQ and COREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program, COUN 6698.

COUN 6699 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hours.

This is an experimental course. The course title and number of credits are noted by course section and announced in the class schedule by the scheduling department. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times. May be repeated. PREREQ: Admission to the Master of Counseling Program, the ED.S. in Counseling Program, or the Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Counseling Program or permission of instructor.

COUN 7701 Advanced Statistics: 2 semester hours.

Statistical application appropriate for doctoral research and writing. PREREQ: Admission to Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Counseling Program.

COUN 7702 Advanced Research and Experimental Design: 2 semester hours.

Quantitative methods of conducting research in doctoral study. PREREQ: Admission to Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Counseling Program.

COUN 7703 Qualitative Research: 2 semester hours.

Explores and contrasts philosophical assumptions of qualitative and quantitative research. Various methodologies and approaches to qualitative research are reviewed and applications discussed. PREREQ: Admission to Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Counseling Program.

COUN 7704 Qualitative Methodology and Analysis: 2 semester hours.

Design, data collection, analysis and writing qualitative research. Practice using data collection procedures, traditional analytic methods and qualitative data processing programs for coding and matrix construction. Emphasizes grounded theory approach. PREREQ: Admission to Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Counseling Program.

COUN 7705 Instructional Theory for Counselor Educators: 4 semester hours.

Instructional theory and methods relevant to counselor education including models and methods of appraisal. PREREQ: Admission to Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Counseling Program.

COUN 7710 Practicum in College Teaching: 2 semester hours.

Observation of and assisting in the teaching and evaluation of a college course under the supervision of the course instructor. The student will prepare and deliver at least five lectures which will be observed by the instructor and will, in addition to observing the balance of the course, meet individually with the instructor for periodic discussions of procedure and methodology. PREREQ: Admission to Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Counseling Program.

COUN 7712 Advanced Psychological Testing and Assessment: 2 semester hours.

Advanced psychological testing concepts, test administration, test construction and interpretation. Advanced information of standardized tests commonly used in the counselor education field.

COUN 7723 Advanced Vocational Theory: 3 semester hours.

Theory of vocational development, sociological aspects of vocational choice and entry, development of interests and aspiration levels, and research relating to entry into work, satisfaction in work, dissatisfaction in topics. Course is structured around the major theories of vocational development as they relate to individual development. Various approaches to vocational testing are included.

COUN 7724 Advanced Diversity Issues: 3 semester hours.

Pedagogy relevant to current social and cultural issues. Role of diversity issues in counselor education, supervision, and counseling.

COUN 7727 Advanced Theories of Counseling: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of various counseling theories and their relationships to specific philosophies concerning humanity.

COUN 7758 Independent Problems: 1-4 semester hours.

Individual work under staff guidance. Field and/or library research on specific educational problems. Experience in research composition. May be repeated up to 8 credits. PREREQ: Admission to Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Counseling Program.

COUN 7759 Ed.S Internship: 1-9 semester hours.

Placement in a post-master's degree counseling setting. A combination of fifty hours of experience and supervision equals one hour of academic credit. May be repeated. 1-9 credits. PREREQ: Admission as an ED.S. student and permission of instructor.

COUN 7774 Advanced Group Procedures: 3 semester hours.

Pedagogy relevant to current social and cultural issues. Role of diversity issues in counselor education, supervision, and counseling. PREREQ: Admission to Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Counseling Program.

COUN 7775 Advanced Practicum in Group Counseling: 2 semester hours.

Fifty hours of group counseling as the group facilitator, plus a coordinating seminar. Includes the theoretical basis for group leaders and development of group leadership skills.

COUN 7790 Supervision in Counselor Education: 3 semester hours.

Analysis of systems for conducting supervision of counseling students including various models of supervision and their implementation in Practicum and Internship. PREREQ: Admission to Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Counseling Program.

COUN 8800 Research and Professional Issues: 2 semester hours.

Critical analysis of the literature in counselor education including topics such as program models, current research, and professional associations. May be repeated up to 3 credits. PREREQ: Admission to Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Counseling Program.

COUN 8801 Doctoral Career Development: 1 semester hour.

Implementation of Career Theory into Professional Development plans for advancement in Counselor Education. PREREQ: Admission to the Ph.D. Program in Counselor Education and Counseling Program.

COUN 8802 Scholarship in Counselor Education: 1 semester hour.

Developing a scholarly identity and research agenda within counselor education and supervision. Course will focus on creating and submitting publishable manuscripts; developing grant writing skills; navigating the academic public process; and, enhancing writing quality and productivity. PREREQ: Admission to Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Counseling Program.

COUN 8848 Doctoral Counseling Practicum: 2 semester hours.

Counseling under supervision and an intensive examination of the students' own counseling philosophy and its relationship to client behavioral and attitudinal change. A combination of fifty hours of experience and supervision equals one hour of academic credit. Each section limited to six students.

COUN 8848L Doctoral Counseling Practicum Lab: 0 semester hours.

Group supervision of student working in the field during their doctoral practicum experience. Supervision is provided on a weekly basis and thus the units of instruction are devised as a tutorial experience based on the student's developmental needs. Graded S/U. PREREQ: Admission to Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Counseling Program.

COUN 8849 Doctoral Internship: 1-18 semester hours.

Placement in a doctoral level counseling or counselor education setting. A combination of fifty hours of experience and supervision equals one hour of academic credit. 1-18 credits. May be repeated. PREREQ: Admisison to Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Counseling Program.

COUN 8849L Doctoral Internship Lab: 0 semester hours.

Group supervision of student working in the field during their doctoral internship experience. Supervision is provided on a weekly basis and thus the units of instruction are devised as tutorial experience based on the student's developmental needs. Graded S/U. PREREQ: Admission to Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Counseling Program.

COUN 8850 Dissertation: 1-12 semester hours.

Variable credits. May be repeated. Graded S/U. PREREQ: Admission to PH.D. in Counselor Education and Counseling Program.

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