Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy

School of Rehabilitation and Communication Sciences

The School of Rehabilitation and Communication Sciences (SRCS) is composed of 2 departments with 5 programs. The department of Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) consists of programs in Audiology, Sign Language Interpreting, and Speech-Language Pathology. The department of Physical and Occupational Therapy (DPOT) includes programs in Occupational Therapy and in Physical Therapy. The programs within the School reflect the organization found in many rehabilitation facilities, acknowledging the strong relationships found among these disciplines.

Baccalaureate Programs

The School of Rehabilitation and Communication Sciences is home to 2 baccalaureate degrees (BS in Communication Sciences & Disorders; BS in Sign Language Interpreting), one baccalaureate degree track (pre-professional Occupational Therapy track through the Bachelor of University Studies degree program), and one Associate’s degree (AS in Sign Language Studies).

Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy

The Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy offers the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) and the Master of Occupational Therapy graduate degrees for those students wanting to enter the professions of occupational or physical therapy. The programs are three years in length and degrees are granted after successful completion of all academic and clinical requirements. Both graduate degree programs are accredited.

The Physical Therapy Graduate Program is accredited by the Commission on ­Accreditation of Physical Therapy ­Education. The Occupational Therapy ­Graduate Program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education.

A 3.0 overall GPA for all prerequisite course work and a 3.0 GPA in each science area is required for consideration for admission into either program. Applicants must additionally meet all requirements for admission to the Graduate School. In addition to specific course prerequisites, applicants will have to provide evidence of having worked in a physical therapy or an occupational therapy setting as an aide or volunteer.

Undergraduate students preparing for physical or occupational therapy should choose a major which is of interest to them and which will assist in completion of prerequisite course work. Baccalaureate students will have advisors in their major department, but should also seek additional health professions' advising through the Department of Biological Sciences. Students who have completed a baccalaureate degree and who are completing prerequisites for physical or occupational therapy should call the Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy for appropriate advising. For further information on physical therapy or occupational therapy entrance requirements and program description, refer to the Graduate Catalog or department website at http://www.isu.edu/dpot/.

Admission into the Occupational Therapy Program

Students may be admitted for fall semester entry into the Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT) program through the normal graduate school admissions procedure by satisfactorily completing the prescribed prerequisite courses and satisfying the other admission requirements as listed on the MOT program application form.

Students may also have the option of early pre-professional entry into the program through the established guidelines of the Bachelor of University Studies (BUS) degree program. The BUS is an interdisciplinary degree designed for students whose career and educational goals are not met by traditional degrees offered at Idaho State University.

During the first three years, the BUS students develop a course of study that will meet their interests, university degree requirements, and Occupational Therapy Program admission requirements. Students may apply to the BUS program after they have 24 earned credit hours. They complete the pre-professional year for occupational therapy during their senior year. With successful completion of the pre-professional year in the OT program, each student will receive a Bachelor of University Studies degree and continue (after acceptance by the Graduate School) directly into the second and third year curriculum for the MOT degree.

The combination of the BUS and Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT) Program creates a seamless entry into the occupational therapy profession, ensuring that all prerequisites in social, physical and biological sciences are completed in a timely manner. For further information on the BUS and the occupational therapy ­program, contact the Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy at (208) 282-4095.

Prerequisites

  • SOCIAL BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE (4 courses, 3 credits each)

Human Development - 1 semester
Sociology - 1 semester
Abnormal Psychology - 1 semester
Cultural Anthropology - 1 semester

  • BIOLOGY (2 courses, 4 credits each)

Anatomy and Physiology, each with laboratory (vertebrate or human); 2 semesters or 2-3 quarters. This course must have been completed within the last 7 years. Courses on human anatomy and physiology MUST be listed in Biology , Zoology, Anatomy or Physiology Departments for fulfillment of this requirement.

  • CHEMISTRY (1 course, 4 credits)

Introductory Chemistry with laboratory, 1 semester. A more advanced chemistry course at upper division or graduate level with laboratory may also meet this requirement. Must be a course for science majors.

  • MATHEMATICS (1 course)

Statistics - 3 or more units. Courses about research methods or tests and measurements will NOT meet this require­ment.

  • ENGLISH/COMMUNICATION (2 courses)

Composition - 3 credits

Speech Communication - 2 or 3 credits

Technical Writing (not required, but highly recommended) - 3 credits

  • OTHER REQUIRED COURSES

At least 5 courses from this category are required, 3 credits each, chosen from:

  • economics
  • history
  • education
  • humanities
  • ethics
  • literature
  • fine arts
  • philosophy
  • foreign language
  • HIGHLY RECOMMENDED:

Introductory Physics with Laboratory

Computer Competence

Applicants must be competent in working with computers and be able to use word processing and spreadsheet software prior to entry into the program.

Physical Therapy Preparation

Although any undergraduate major is acceptable for entry into the Doctor of Physical Therapy program, preparation must provide a strong background in natural and social sciences and include the following prerequisite courses. 

  • BIOLOGY (3 courses). Botany courses will NOT be accepted.

1 & 2. Anatomy and Physiology each with laboratory (vertebrate or human), 2 semesters or 2-3 quarters. This course must have been completed within the last 7 years. Courses on human anatomy and physiology MUST be listed in Biology, Zoology, Anatomy or Physiology Departments for fulfillment of this requirement.

3. Exercise Physiology, 2 or 3 credits. This course may be found in Physical Education departments.

  • CHEMISTRY (2 courses)

1 & 2. Introductory Chemistry with laboratory, 2 semesters or 2-3 quarters. A more recently completed chemistry course at upper division or graduate level with laboratory may also meet this requirement. Must be courses for science majors.

  • PHYSICS (2 courses)

1 & 2. Introductory Physics with laboratory, 2 semesters or 2-3 quarters. A more recently completed physics course at upper division or graduate level with laboratory may also meet this requirement. Must be courses for science majors.

  • MATHEMATICS (1 course)

1. Statistics - 3 or more units. Courses about research methods or tests and measurements will NOT meet this require­ment.

  • PSYCHOLOGY and SOCIOLOGY or ANTHROPOLOGY or HEALTH SCIENCE (5 courses)

1. Introductory Psychology. More recent upper division psychology courses may be accepted.

2. Sociology or Anthropology or Health Science or Psychology (1 course). This course must be relevant to health care, rural societies, cultural diversity, aging, health care administration, abnormal psychology or epidemiology. Marriage/Family, religion or history courses will NOT meet this requirement.

3. Course in Human Development or Motor Development Learning (2-3 ­credits).

  • MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY (1 semester)

1. One semester of medical terminology.

Computer Competence and Technical Writing

Applicants must be competent in working with computers and be able to use word processing and spreadsheet software prior to entry into the program. A course in technical writing is strongly recommended.

Occupational Therapy Preparation

Occupational Therapists are health practitioners with graduate-level degrees who help people across the lifespan participate in the things they want and need to do through the therapeutic use of everyday activities (occupations).  Common occupational therapy interventions include helping children with disabilities to participate fully in school and social situations, helping people recovering from injury to regain skills, and providing supports for older adults experiencing physical and cognitive changes. 

The curative nature of occupational therapy is extremely broad and requires practitioners with an interest in the complexity of humanity and the diversity of human occupation.  They also need the ability to think critically and creatively and to be able to address occupational performance problems resulting from disease, trauma, and mental illness.  To be prepared, a student must enter the profession with a foundation in the liberal arts in addition to biological, physical, and social ­sciences.  For this reason, graduate-level programs in occupational therapy require specific coursework as a prerequisite to applying for admission to their programs.  Graduate-level programs in occupational therapy do not require a specific undergraduate degree for admissions.

The Bachelor of Science in Health Science (BSHS) Pre-Occupational Therapy Concentration (4+3) is a degree program designed for students who are interested in a future career in the health profession.  It provides a concentration area for students wishing to eventually apply to a graduate program in occupational therapy.  One BSHS degree concentration area, Pre-Occupational Therapy, allows for the student to obtain a broad health science background by completing a BSHS degree.  Once completed, the student is positioned with the necessary academic prerequisites to apply to many graduate-level occupational therapy programs (but students must carefully check prerequisite requirements for all programs they are interested in to assure fulfillment of each program's individual requirements).  Admission and successful completion of this concentration area does not guarantee admission into the ISU Master of Occupational Therapy program.

The second BSHS professional concentration area, Pre-Occupational Therapy, Accelerated (3+3) (available to a limited number of students selected on a competitive basis), provides the opportunity for students to enter the graduate-level ISU Occupational Therapy program during their fourth undergraduate year and complete a pre-professional year in the program while undergraduates.  During the first three years, students wishing to pursue this concentration area complete a course of study that meets the ISU General Education requirements and the OT program prerequisite course requirements.  These students may apply during the fall semester of their junior academic year for accelerated entry status.  If accepted, they complete the pre-professional year within the OT program during their senior year.  Upon successful completion of the pre-professional year, each student will receive a Bachelor of Science in Health Science degree and continue (after acceptance by the Graduate School) as a graduate student directly into the third semester (summer) of the Master of Occupational Therapy program with expected completion and awarding of the Master's degree two years later.

Students not accepted into the accelerated concentration area may continue within the pre-OT curriculum, earn their bachelor degrees, and apply to graduate-level occupational therapy programs at ISU and elsewhere through the traditional graduate school processes.

Due to the competitive nature of admission to graduate-level occupational therapy programs, students are strongly encouraged to maintain a minimum grade point average of 3.0 throughout the BSHS curriculum.
 

Bachelor of Science in Health Science 

Concentration1: Pre-Occupational Therapy

Required Courses

General Education Objectives (min 36 cr)36
BS in Health Science Core20-24
ANTH 2238Peoples and Cult of New World3
BIOL 3302
  & 3302L
Anatomy and Physiology
   and Anatomy and Physiology Lab
4
CHEM 1111
  & 1111L
General Chemistry I
   and General Chemistry I Lab
5
ENGL 1101English Composition3
MATH 1153Introduction to Statistics3
PSYC 2225Child Development3
PSYC 3301Abnormal Psychology I3
SOC 1101Introduction to Sociology3
5 additional courses (3 credits each) from economics, education, ethics, fine arts, foreign language, history, humanities, literature, and philosophy15
Electives18-22

Highly Recommended Electives:

ENGL 3307Professional and Tech Writing3
PHYS 1111
  & PHYS 1113
General Physics
   and General Physics I Laboratory
4

 

See the Bachelor of Science in Health Science in the Division of Health Sciences section of the catalog for additional information. 

Concentration 2: Pre-Occupational Therapy, Accelerated

Required Courses

General Education Objectives (min 36 cr)36
BS in Health Science Core20-24

Accelerated Occupational Therapy Concentration (46 cr)1

ANTH 2238Peoples and Cult of New World3
(Satisfies General Education Objective 9)
BIOL 3302
  & 3302L
Anatomy and Physiology
   and Anatomy and Physiology Lab
4
CHEM 1111
  & 1111L
General Chemistry I
   and General Chemistry I Lab
5
(The two sets of courses above satisfy General Education Objective 5)
MATH 1153Introduction to Statistics3
(Satisfies General Education Objective 3)
ENGL 1101English Composition3
PSYC 3301Abnormal Psychology I3
PSYC 2225Child Development3
SOC 1101Introduction to Sociology3
(Partially satisfies General Education Objective 6)
5 additional courses (3 credits each) from economics, education, ethics, fine arts, foreign language, history, humanities, literature, philosophy 15

1

Some Pre-Occupational Therapy Accelerated Concentration courses can also meet General Education Objectives.

Apply to the Pre-Occupational Therapy Accelerated Program during fall semester of junior year.

Pre-Professional Year (if accepted into the program)  (31 cr)

BIOL 4474Human Anatomy OT and PT5
BIOL 4486Human Systemic Physiology5
PTOT 4412Professional Communication2
PTOT 4413Occup Therapy Profession3
PTOT 4401Clin Kinesiol & Biomechanics4
PTOT 4402Clinical Neuroscience5
PTOT 4421Self-Exploration in Occupation3
PTOT 4422Occupational Performance3
PTOT 4442Occupational Performance Lab1

 

See the Bachelor of Science in Health Science in the Division of Health Sciences section of the catalog for additional information.

How to Read Course Descriptions

Courses

PTOT 2209 Intro to Occupational Therapy: 1 semester hour.

Exploration of the diversity of occupational therapy and how occupation or "activity" can be used as an intervention for promoting health and independence in persons with physical, emotional, and developmental disabilities. S

PTOT 2299 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hour.

PTOT 4401 Clin Kinesiol & Biomechanics: 4 semester hours.

Analysis of normal and pathological human movement in joints, posture, gait, and the vertebral column. Application of movements to therapeutic interventions is emphasized. PREREQ: BIOL 4474. S

PTOT 4402 Clinical Neuroscience: 5 semester hours.

Study of structure and function of the human nervous system or the cellular and systemic levels. Specific application to clinical management of neurological problems and pathology. PREREQ: BIOL 4474 and BIOL 4486. S

PTOT 4412 Professional Communication: 2 semester hours.

Introduction to standard forms of professional communication in physical and occupational therapy and among other health care professions. Medical record-keeping and interdisciplinary communication are emphasized. F

PTOT 4413 Occup Therapy Profession: 3 semester hours.

Historical overview of occupational therapy in health care, education and psychosocial settings. Occupational therapy process, rural human service delivery system, professionalism, ethics, and legal issues will be examined. F

PTOT 4421 Self-Exploration in Occupation: 3 semester hours.

Focus on self-exploration in occupation and purposeful activity. Self-evaluation in occupational performance areas, components, and context. The student will complete a self-development plan in occupation. Su

PTOT 4422 Occupational Performance: 3 semester hours.

Person/occupation/environment interactions are examined from the perspective of multiple theories and models that analyze typical occupations and address performance dysfunctions. PREREQ: PTOT 4413 and PTOT 4421. COREQ: PTOT 4442. S

PTOT 4442 Occupational Performance Lab: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to and practice using occupation focused evaluation tools and methodologies used in analyzing, evaluating, and categorizing occupational performance. COREQ: PTOT 4422. S

Faculty

Chair and Associate Professor

Creelman

OT Program Director and Associate Professor

Gee

Assistant Professors

Dye

Kendall

Clinical Associate Professors

Seiger

Thompson

Clinical Assistant Professors

Alexander

Jackman

Lloyd

Peterson

Ralphs

Adjunct Faculty

Anderson

Meldrum

Owens

Rodnick

Urfer