Psychology

Psychology is defined as the science of behavior and conscious experience. Its domain ranges from the natural to the social sciences and includes such diverse topics as brain function, sensation and perception, learning and cognition, development, personality, and social behavior. At the undergraduate level, the major emphasizes the role of the liberal arts in higher education and personal development.

Goals for majors in the undergraduate program in psychology are listed below; each goal has associated objectives and competencies.

  1. Be informed of the departmental goals and degree requirements for psychology majors,
  2. Know about possible careers in and/or related to psychology,
  3. Integrate knowledge and theories across, and think critically about, topics within the domains of psychology,
  4. Be competent in library information technology and computer applications related to the study of psychology,
  5. Be competent in scientific methodology and analysis as they apply to the study of psychology,
  6. Communicate effectively, in both oral and written form, about issues within the field of psychology,
  7. Have an understanding of the breadth of the field of psychology and its ­applications,
  8. Have knowledge pertaining to individual and cultural differences and their importance in community and public policy decisions,
  9. Perceive their undergraduate education and the skills they developed as beneficial in their chosen fields, and
  10. Be prepared for post-graduate study.

Beyond the university's General Education Objectives, psychology students learn critical thinking and problem-solving skills by developing competence in the methods of scientific research, psychometric principles, and data analysis. They integrate and apply the theories and knowledge base from the various domains of psychology and develop a well-rounded view of psychology and its importance in understanding behavior. Psychology promotes an appreciation for individual and cultural differences, as well as ethical principles in decision-making. The study of psychology increases understanding of self and others and enables individuals to make informed judgments that strengthen community and public policy.

The major assists students in developing their skills in library research, scientific writing, public presentations, and computer applications. Psychology students are encouraged to participate in research projects and community practicums. They also become aware of the various career options related to the major. By providing a broad-based education and the aforementioned skills, the major prepares students for entry-level positions in business, government, and a wide range of human service positions. The major also prepares students for graduate education and careers in psychology as well as areas such as law and public service, medicine and health-related professions, business programs emphasizing organizational development and human resources, and seminary.

Admission

The requirements for admission to the Psychology major are as follows:

Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in Psychology

Required Courses

PSYC 1101Intro to General Psychology (partially satisfies General Education Objective 6)3
PSYC 2201Careers in Psychology1
PSYC 2227Basic Statistics3
PSYC 3303Experimental Psychology4
Total Hours11

Core Areas

Category 1: Select two of the following four courses:6
PSYC 2225Child Development3
PSYC 3301Abnormal Psychology I3
PSYC 3341Social Psychology3
PSYC 4401Theories of Personality3
Category 2: Select two of the following four courses: 6
PSYC 4431Physiological Psychology I3
PSYC 4445Psychology of Learning3
PSYC 4446Cognitive Processes3
PSYC 4472History of Psychology3

Elective Courses

  • Students may choose fifteen (15) elective credits, at least twelve (12) of which must be upper-division.
  • No more than nine (9) credits can come from PSYC 4483, Special Problems.
  • Students planning to apply to graduate school are encouraged to enroll in PSYC 4491, Senior Seminar, which offers opportunities for design and conduct of experiments, as well as additional training in writing. These students are also encouraged to take more classes from the core areas that will be counted as electives and will prepare them for graduate school.

Minor in Psychology

Required Courses

PSYC 1101Intro to General Psychology (partially satisfies General Education Objective 6)3
PSYC 2227Basic Statistics3
PSYC 3303Experimental Psychology4
Category 1: Select one of the following four courses: 3
PSYC 2225Child Development3
PSYC 3301Abnormal Psychology I3
PSYC 3341Social Psychology3
PSYC 4401Theories of Personality3
Category 2: Select one of the following four courses: 3
PSYC 4431Physiological Psychology I3
PSYC 4445Psychology of Learning3
PSYC 4446Cognitive Processes3
PSYC 4472History of Psychology3
Electives6
The student must take six additional elective credits in psychology

How to Read Course Descriptions

Courses

PSYC 1101 Intro to General Psychology: 3 semester hours.

Brief history of the science of psychology and study of human behavior and mental processes. Discusses biological, cognitive, and social bases of behavior. Partially satisfies Objective 6 of the General Education Requirements. F, S

PSYC 2200 Child Abuse: 3 semester hours.

Investigation into the psychological and social factors which contribute to child abuse and neglect, and to their identification, treatment, and prevention. D

PSYC 2201 Careers in Psychology: 1 semester hour.

Provides psychology majors with the information and skills necessary to be successful and to pursue a career in psychology or a related field. F, S

PSYC 2205 Human Sexuality: 3 semester hours.

The psychological, biological, and sociological aspects of human sexuality. Emphasis on gender identity, the human reproductive system, human sexual expressions, and sexual problems in males and females. D

PSYC 2211 Personality and Adjustment: 3 semester hours.

The lifelong development of personality and the search for self-realization will be emphasized. Opportunities and crises common at various periods will be discussed. PREREQ: PSYC 1101. D

PSYC 2225 Child Development: 3 semester hours.

Study of development from conception through adolescence. Considers typical changes within the biological, cognitive, and socioemotional domains and the influence of contexts (e.g., family, peers, school, culture) within each area. F, S

PSYC 2227 Basic Statistics: 3 semester hours.

Consideration of statistical techniques and methods used in psychological investigations in terms of derivation, application, and limitation. PREREQ: MATH 1153 or permission of instructor. F, S

PSYC 2228 Measurement and Test Construct: 3 semester hours.

Brief history and survey of the development of psychological test instruments and an introduction to the theory and mechanisms of test construction. PREREQ: PSYC 2227. D

PSYC 2250 Female and Male Roles: 3 semester hours.

Examines the biological and social factors involved in the present-day conceptions of male and female and the relations between the sexes. D

PSYC 2299 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hour.

This is an experimental course. The course title and number of credits are announced in the class schedule by the scheduling department. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content

PSYC 3301 Abnormal Psychology I: 3 semester hours.

The role of biological, psychological and sociological factors in the development of abnormal behavior of a functional nature. Neuroses, character disorders, functional psychosis, behavior disorders of childhood, and maladaptive groups. Explanatory and predictive value of several models of psychopathology. PREREQ: PSYC 1101. F, S

PSYC 3302 Abnormal Psychology II: 3 semester hours.

Alcoholism and drug dependence, psychosomatic disorders, organic brain syndromes, and mental retardation. Contemporary approaches to assessment and treatment of abnormal behavior, including a survey of psychotherapeutic methods. PREREQ: PSYC 1101 and PSYC 3301. D

PSYC 3303 Experimental Psychology: 4 semester hours.

Introduction to the methods of psychological research. Students will be required to perform experiments. PREREQ: PSYC 1101 and PSYC 2227. F, S

PSYC 3305 Psychology of Consciousness: 3 semester hours.

This course presents the principle concepts, theories, and research regarding the nature of consciousness and its various states. Topics may include the human sleep-wake cycle, dreaming, time phenomenology, psychotropic drug effects, hypnosis, meditation, biofeedback, and intuition. PREREQ: PSYC 1101 or permission of instructor. D

PSYC 3310 Applied Techniques: 2 semester hours.

Acquaints students with techniques in selected areas of applied psychology, such as stress management, animal training, human factors, behavior modification, etc. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. PREREQ: PSYC 1101. D

PSYC 3332 Psychology of Adolescence: 3 semester hours.

Critical review of work related to the physiological, cognitive, and emotional development of the adolescent personality. General concepts relating to specific characteristics of adolescent behavior will be developed. PREREQ: PSYC 1101 and PSYC 2225. D

PSYC 3341 Social Psychology: 3 semester hours.

Study of the impact of social and cultural forces upon the individual and of the interaction between individuals producing social phenomena. PREREQ: PSYC 1101 or permission of instructor. F

PSYC 3344 Adult Development and Aging: 3 semester hours.

Study of development across adulthood, emphasizing late adulthood to death. Considers biological, social, and cognitive domains of development and contexts of change. PREREQ: PSYC 1101 and PSYC 2225. D

PSYC 3369 AIDS: 1 semester hour.

This survey course provides an overview of AIDS from biomedical, psychological, and sociological perspectives. The intrusive nature of this epidemic into all aspects of our lives is emphasized. No science background is required. Graded S/U. PREREQ: PSYC 1101 or permission of instructor. D

PSYC 4401 Theories of Personality: 3 semester hours.

Detailed study of the leading theories of personality with emphasis on the Freudian, Neo-Freudian, humanistic and existential theories. PREREQ: PSYC 1101 or permission of instructor. S

PSYC 4404 Sensation and Perception: 4 semester hours.

The anatomical and physiological bases of sensation will be reviewed. Moreover, traditional and contemporary theories of perception will be critically considered. Students will be expected to do laboratory work illustrating basic concepts of sensory and perceptual functions. PREREQ: PSYC 1101 and PSYC 4431 or PSYC 4446. D

PSYC 4408 Science Pseudosci and Psych: 3 semester hours.

Critical evaluation of fringe-science, paranormal, and other unproven claims. Introduction to the psychological processes underlying pseudo-scientific thinking and beliefs. PREREQ: PSYC 1101 or permission of instructor. D

PSYC 4412 Ethical and Prof Issues Psych: 2 semester hours.

Topics include informed consent, confidentiality, deception, duty to protect, competency, malpractice, dual and collegial relationships, and impaired professionals in research and practice. PREREQ: PSYC 1101; 24 credits in psychology or permission of instructor. F

PSYC 4417 Interdisciplinary Eval Team: 1 semester hour.

Introduction to principles, techniques of interdisciplinary evaluation. Disciplines emphasized: Audiology, Nursing, Physical Therapy, Psychology, Social Work, Special Education, Speech-Language Pathology. PREREQ: PSYC 1101 or permission of instructor. Equivalent to NURS 4417, SOWK 4417, and CSED 4417. S

PSYC 4423 Community Practicum: 1-2 semester hour.

Students work in regional agencies by observing or participating in professional activities under appropriate supervision. Four hours per week per credit. May be repeated up to 6 credits. Graded S/U. PREREQ: PSYC 1101 and permission of instructor. F, S, Su

PSYC 4425 Psychology Clinic Practicum: 1-2 semester hour.

Undergraduates observe and assist graduate students and faculty in the delivery of psychological services. Four hours per week per credit. May be repeated up to 6 credits. Graded S/U. PREREQ: PSYC 1101 and permission of instructor. F, S, Su

PSYC 4431 Physiological Psychology I: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to neuropsychology with an emphasis on methods, basic neuroanatomy, and neurophysiology. PREREQ: Six hours of Psychology beyond PSYC 1101 or permission of instructor. F

PSYC 4432 Physiological Psychology II: 3 semester hours.

Survey of the physiological bases of psychological processes, including learning, emotion, motivation, sensation, and perception. Emphasizes current research and theory concerning brain mechanisms and behavior. PREREQ: PSYC 4431 or permission of instructor. AS

PSYC 4435 Animal Behavior: 3 semester hours.

Study of experiments in animal learning which relate to our understanding of human learning. Course is concerned with both observation and experimental studies of habit formation, conditioning, related endocrinology, and nerve structure as they are associated with behavior capabilities. PREREQ: Six hours in Psychology beyond PSYC 1101 or permission of instructor. D

PSYC 4443 Advanced Social Psychology: 3 semester hours.

In-depth study of current theory, issues and research in the field of social psychology. Emphasis is on newly emerging research areas such as nonverbal communication; human uses of space; development of moral and ethical values; helping behavior, and compliance obedience research. PREREQ: PSYC 3341 or permission of instructor. D

PSYC 4445 Psychology of Learning: 3 semester hours.

Survey of the major principles of learning. Including the processes underlying classical and instrumental conditioning and motor behavior. PREREQ: PSYC 1101 and permission of instructor. F

PSYC 4446 Cognitive Processes: 3 semester hours.

A survey of the major and current concepts, theories, and research in cognitive psychology. Areas of emphasis include attention, memory, information processing, mental imagery, decision-making, and problem solving. PREREQ: PSYC 1101. PREREQ or COREQ: PSYC 3303. S

PSYC 4451 Clinical Psychology: 3 semester hours.

Surveys the field of clinical psychology; with emphasis on past and present status, diagnosis, assessment, critical topics related to intervention, the clinical psychologist's professional role, and student training. PREREQ: PSYC 1101 or permission of instructor. D

PSYC 4453 Psychosocial Child Therapy: 3 semester hours.

Review of the psychopathology, diagnosis, and treatment of the major psychosocial disorders of childhood. PREREQ: PSYC 1101 and PSYC 2225. D

PSYC 4463 Clinical Psych and the Law: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the field of forensic psychology by exposing students to the primary areas in which clinical psychology relates to the legal system. Emphasis will be on expert testimony by clinicians in matters of criminal responsibility, mental competency, civil commitment, and child custody. PREREQ: PSYC 1101. D

PSYC 4464 Dilemmas of Youth: 3 semester hours.

This course surveys theory and research concerned with dilemmas of identity formation. Personal accounts, literature - classical and psychological - will serve to illustrate dilemmas and explain their resolutions. PREREQ: PSYCH 1101. D

PSYC 4465 Behavioral Medicine: 3 semester hours.

Psychological issues of health, disease states, and prevention. Critical evaluation of clinical research and practice, including nontraditional healing techniques and current models used to understand health and disease. PREREQ: PSYC 1101 or permission of instructor. D

PSYC 4467 Topics in Psychology: 1-3 semester hour.

Selected topics in psychology. Contents vary. May be repearted with different content and departmental approval up to 3 times for a total of 9 credits. PREREQ: PSYC 1101 or permission of the instructor. D

PSYC 4472 History of Psychology: 3 semester hours.

Modern psychology in historical perspective. Genesis and development of fundamental problems and methods, with emphasis on specific fields of research. PREREQ: Fifteen hours in Psychology beyond PSYC 1101 or permission of instructor. S

PSYC 4483 Special Problems: 1-3 semester hour.

Research or readings in a special area of interest to be arranged on an individual basis with individual faculty. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 credits. PREREQ: Permission of instructor. D

PSYC 4491 Senior Seminar: 3 semester hours.

Library, field, or experimental research in an area selected by the instructor, including oral and written presentation of results. PREREQ: 90 credits and PSYC 3303. Graded S/U. D

PSYC 4497 Workshop: 1-2 semester hour.

Workshops aimed at the development and improvement of skills. Does not satisfy requirements for a major or a minor. May be repeated. PREREQ: PSYC 1101 or permission of instructor. Graded S/U. D

PSYC 4499 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hour.

This is an experimental course. The course title and number of credits are announced in the class schedule by the scheduling department. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content

Faculty

Chair and Professor

Lynch

Professors

Hatzenbuehler

Roberts

Turley-Ames

Vik

Wong

Associate Professors

Lawyer

Letzring

Rasmussen

Assistant Professors

Brumley

Haight

Nylen

Stewart

Weller

Visiting Assistant Professor

Miyake

Adjunct Faculty

Gibson

Heyneman

Landers

Pongratz

Simonson

Sommer

Emeriti

Enloe

Joe