History

Historical Thinking Objectives

The Department of History has developed the following Historical Thinking Objectives as a guide to the design of the undergraduate curriculum. We use this list to review the department’s course offerings to make sure that the students have adequate opportunities to develop toward these goals.

  1. Explain historical developments and events in their global contexts.
  2. Identify regions as historical entities, how they are connected, and how they have changed over time.
  3. Interpret individual and collective actions in historical contexts.
  4. Analyze primary and secondary sources and develop interpretations.
  5. Develop and present historical interpretations in writing and in oral presentations.

Bachelor of Arts in History

Graduation Requirements

In addition to 8 of the 9 General Education Objectives (minimum 36 credits--see the General Education Requirements described in the Academic Information section of this catalog), all history majors must take a minimum of 36 credits from the following six categories:

Category I: World Regions
9 credits, at least 3 of which must be in HIST 1101 or HIST 11029
Foundations of Europe
Modern Europe
(each course above partially satisfies General Education Objective 6)
Ancient World
World Regional Geography
Latin America
East Asian History
Middle Eastern Civilization
African History and Culture
Category II: Research Skills6
The Historian's Craft
Seminar
Category III: Course for Teachers
The following course is designed expressly for education majors. It may be taken as elective credit under Category IV below:
US History for Teachers
Category IV: Upper Division United States History 6
Early North America
Industrialization Reform in US
Modern United States
Federal Indian Relations
Idaho History
Women in North American West
North American West
US Political History
Disease and U.S. Public Health
Category V: Upper division world, comparative, and non-U.S. history 6
History of Christianity
Relig Reform and Conflict
Old Regime and French Rev
Twentieth Century Europe
Russia
Foreign Relations since 1900
Global Environmental History
Colonial Frontiers Amer-Africa
Families in Former Times
Women in Pre-Industrial Europe
Feminism and Equality
The Viking Age
English History
Victorian England and After
Soc and Econ Hist Greece Rome
Medieval Soc and Econ Hist
Golden Age Castile
Renaissance Creativity
The Global Hispanic Monarchy
Islam and Natnlism Mod World
Imperialism and Progressivism
Cartography:Hist and Design
   and Cartography Lab
Category VI: Electives9
Students must take at least 9 additional credits from courses listed in Categories III, IV, V, or the following list of courses:9
Archaelgy and Hist of So Idaho
Public History Internship
Problems in History
Introduction to Museum Studies
Independent Study:US 1
Independent Study: Europe 1
Independent Study:World Rgns 1
Intro to Cultural Resource Mgt
Economic History
Principles of GIS
   and Principles of GIS Laboratory
Historical Geography of Idaho
GIS for Social Sciences
Statistical Methods
Intro to Political Philosophy
American Political Theory
Total Hours45

1

Using more than one independent study class (HIST 4461, HIST 4462, or HIST 4463) to fulfill the requirements requires the permission of the history chair. 


Foreign Language Requirement

All History majors must complete 1 year of a foreign language or its equivalent to complete the B.A. degree. These courses also partially satisfy Objective 4 of the General Education requirements. All students, particularly those planning graduate work, are strongly urged to pursue additional foreign language training beyond this requirement.

Minor in History

World Regions (9 credits, no more than 3 of which must be HIST 1101 or HIST 1102):9
Foundations of Europe
Modern Europe
(each course above partially satisfies General Education Objective 6)
Ancient World
World Regional Geography
Latin America
East Asian History
Middle Eastern Civilization
African History and Culture
Other Courses:
ONE additional 2000-4000 level course in History 3
TWO additional 3000-4000 level courses in History 6
Total Hours18


Teaching Majors and Minors

Students pursuing a major in Secondary Education History follow a nearly identical curriculum to the B.A. in History. The Department recommends that those students pursue a double major with History. All History majors and minors in Education should consult an advisor in the History Department as well as in the College of Education.

Pre-Law Majors

Dr. Ron Hatzenbuehler is the pre-law advisor for the History Department. Students interested in a postgraduate legal education should ­consult regularly with him.

How to Read Course Descriptions

Courses

HIST 1101 Foundations of Europe: 3 semester hours.

Historical development of Europe since ancient times as a world region and its expanding importance in the first global age, to 1700. Partially satisfies Objective 6 of the General Education Requirements. D

HIST 1102 Modern Europe: 3 semester hours.

Europe's rise and decline as the dominant world region during the second global age, from 1700 to the present. Partially satisfies Objective 6 of the General Education Requirements. D

HIST 1111 US History to 1865: 3 semester hours.

Colonial origins and achievement of independence, constitutional government, national boundaries, and the preservation of the union. Partially satisfies Objective 6 of the General Education Requirements. F, S

HIST 1112 US History 1865 to Present: 3 semester hours.

The domestic and international development of a plural, industrial society. Partially satisfies Objective 6 of the General Education Requirements. F, S

HIST 1118 US History and Culture: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to U.S. history and culture, including cultural change over time. Satisfies Objective 7 of the General Education Requirements. F, S, Su

HIST 1199 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hour.

This is an experimental course. The course title and number of credits are announced in the class schedule by the scheduling department. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content

HIST 2221 Ancient World: 3 semester hours.

History and archaeology of social, political, economic, and cultural developments in the ancient world. Rotating topics include Egypt, the Near East, Greece, Rome, and Central Asia. D

HIST 2249 World Regional Geography: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to world regions, using a geographic perspective as a vehicle, through the principal themes of human geography including, but not limited to, the spatial distributions and interactions of history, culture, economy, population, and environment. Satisfies Objective 9 of the General Education Requirements. F, S, Su

HIST 2251 Latin America: 3 semester hours.

Historical development in its global context of Latin America as a world region, defined by the religion, political institutions, and languages brought by Iberian conquerors and characterized by the contributions of Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans. Satisfies Objective 9 of the General Education Requirements. D

HIST 2252 East Asian History: 3 semester hours.

The origins and growth of the distinctive cultures of China and Japan; their encounters with the West and different responses to Westernization, and their roles in the modern world. Satisfies Objective 9 of the General Education Requirements. D

HIST 2254 Middle Eastern Civilization: 3 semester hours.

Middle Eastern Civilization from the emergence of Islam to the present. Emphasis on fundamentals of Islamic culture and modern political and social developments. Satisfies Objective 9 of the General Education Requirements. D

HIST 2255 African History and Culture: 3 semester hours.

An introductory survey of Africa covering traditional political systems and culture, the impact of Christianity and Islam, the economic and political intrusion of Europe, and the development of economic and political crises in contemporary Africa. Satisfies Objective 9 of the General Education Requirements. D

HIST 2258 Native American History: 3 semester hours.

Assesses diversity of North American natives, their life and thought; European impact; federal policy; and natives' response to continual cultural and physical assault. Equivalent to ANTH 2258. D

HIST 2291 The Historian's Craft: 3 semester hours.

Takes an interdisciplinary approach to historical research. Trains students in diverse methods of inquiry and analysis. To be taken as early as possible after a student has declared a major in History. Required prerequisite for HIST 4491. Satisfies Objective 8 of the General Education Requirements. F, S

HIST 2299 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hour.

This course is not described in the catalog. The course title and number of credits are announced in the class schedule by the scheduling department. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times

HIST 3307 Early North America: 3 semester hours.

A study of American cultures prior to the arrival of Europeans, of the variety of transplanted cultures in America and their changes over time. Special emphasis on the founding of the United States and the establishment of government under the Constitution. R2

HIST 3308 Industrialization Reform in US: 3 semester hours.

1820-1932. The emergence of industrialization in the early 19th century, the impact of the Civil War on industrialization, and industrialization's attendant political, social, cultural, and economic reforms and changes. Special attention paid to abolitionism, postwar reconstruction, and the Great Migration of African Americans to the industrialized North. R2

HIST 3309 Modern United States: 3 semester hours.

An historical examination of the United States from the 1930s to the present, focusing on the Great Depression, New Deal, World War II, the U.S. rise to global power, its maturation as a mass society, the rise and decline of liberalism and conservatism, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, the changing nature of citizenship and culture, and the end of the Cold War. R2

HIST 3318 History of Christianity: 3 semester hours.

This course will survey the history of Christianity from its origins to its various expressions in the modern world. Special attention will be given to the initial formation of Christian traditions, the encounter of Christianity with intellectual and social trends in western history, and the periodic movements of reform which sought to refashion Christian life and institutions. D

HIST 3322 Relig Reform and Conflict: 3 semester hours.

A comparative study of the development of new faith communities and the religious violence which shattered the unity of Western Christianity, 1300-1650. D

HIST 3323 Old Regime and French Rev: 3 semester hours.

A study of traditional European institutions, society, and culture from 1650 to 1789 and their transformation in the age of the French Revolution and Napoleon, 1789-1815. D

HIST 3326 Twentieth Century Europe: 3 semester hours.

Europe from World War I through the end of the century, including the world wars, the rise of communism, fascism, and totalitarianism, the Holocaust, the 1980s revolutions, and the uniting of Europe in the European Union. D

HIST 3337 Archaelgy and Hist of So Idaho: 2 semester hours.

A multicultural, ethnographic perspective on the history of the Snake River Plain. Course content focuses on the 1811 to 1890s time period and is rich in details based on information gathered from the earliest accounts and historical archaeological fieldwork. D

HIST 3364 Public History Internship: 1-6 semester hour.

Faculty-supervised placement in historical societies, museums, archives, government agencies, municipal departments, libraries or other institutions engaged in historical preservation, dissemination, and/or research. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. D

HIST 3382 Russia: 3 semester hours.

Russian history and civilization from the medieval Kievan state to modern times. D

HIST 3399 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hour.

This is an experimental course. The course title and number of credits are announced in the class schedule by the scheduling department. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times with the same title and content

HIST 4405 Problems in History: 3 semester hours.

A thorough consideration of historical problems, particularly from a comparative perspective. Designed to give deeper insight into problems, issues, and topics which are treated more generally in other courses. May be repeated with different content. D

HIST 4411 Introduction to Museum Studies: 2 semester hours.

History, philosophy, purposes, organization and administration of museums. Practical work in collections management and museum interpretation. Equivalent to MUSE 4411. F

HIST 4418 US History for Teachers: 3 semester hours.

U.S. history from indigenous cultures through modern America. Based on Idaho Department of Education Standards for high school students. F, S

HIST 4421 Federal Indian Relations: 3 semester hours.

Legal-historical examination of the relationship between North American tribal peoples and the U.S. federal government between 1750 and the present. Special emphasis will be placed on Indian removal, assimilation policy, treaty negotiation, the Dawes Severalty Act, education policy, Indian reorganization policy, and termination. R2

HIST 4423 Idaho History: 3 semester hours.

A survey of the social, cultural, environmental, and political history of Idaho from pre-contact indigenous cultures to the present, emphasizing Idaho's relation to other states and regions in the West. F, S, Su

HIST 4425 Women in North American West: 3 semester hours.

Comparative examination of the varied experiences of women in the North American West. Analyzes perceptions of women and women's views of themselves, women's activism, and women's cultural activities. Places special emphasis on the use of non-textual historical sources in uncovering the past lives of North American western women. R

HIST 4427 North American West: 3 semester hours.

History of the North American West from pre-contact indigenous cultures to the present, with an emphasis on exploration, settlement, ethnic groups, borderlands, environment, federal policy, and cultural depictions. R2

HIST 4429 Foreign Relations since 1900: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the history of international relations in the twentieth century. This course emphasizes the impact of wars on various peoples and cultures, anti-colonialism and the rise of the so-called 'Third World,' and the processes of political, cultural and economic 'globalization.' R2

HIST 4430 Global Environmental History: 3 semester hours.

Comparative examinations of historical interactions between humans and environmental factors in various time periods and regions throughout the world, and an assessment of their impacts on historical change. R2

HIST 4435 Colonial Frontiers Amer-Africa: 3 semester hours.

A comparative examination of exploration, conquest, and resistance, and the interaction of cultures in frontier settings. Examines both the realities of the frontier and their impact on Western thought and imagination. D

HIST 4437 Families in Former Times: 3 semester hours.

Reconstructs the marriage patterns and domestic lives of people in pre-industrial Europe (1000-1700 AD). R2

HIST 4438 Women in Pre-Industrial Europe: 3 semester hours.

Compares and contrasts the social, cultural and economic roles of women from 700-1700 AD, and analyzes the impacts of historical change on their lives. D

HIST 4439 Feminism and Equality: 3 semester hours.

Interdisciplinary study of the history of feminism and women's rights in different world regions, involving the social constructs of gender, race, and class. Equivalent to WS 4439. S

HIST 4441 The Viking Age: 3 semester hours.

Studies the cultures and societies of Scandinavia, England and continental Europe from 700 to 1100 AD. D

HIST 4443 English History: 3 semester hours.

Survey of the most important British political, constitutional, economic, and cultural developments from Anglo-Saxon times to the Victorian period. D

HIST 4444 Victorian England and After: 3 semester hours.

England, 1837 to the present. An examination of the cultural, social, political, and economic history of the most prosperous and productive period of English history including British national and imperial decline in the twentieth century. D

HIST 4446 Soc and Econ Hist Greece Rome: 3 semester hours.

Investigates ways in which geography, demography and politics affected the mentalities and behaviors of social groups--women, patrons, clients and slaves--and the functioning of households, villages and cities. D

HIST 4448 Medieval Soc and Econ Hist: 3 semester hours.

Analyzes the impact of political instability, migration and environment upon Europeans (AD 200-1400). D

HIST 4450 Golden Age Castile: 3 semester hours.

History of a major European country in an age of globalization, military revolution, religious conflict, and significant cultural development, 1450-1700. D

HIST 4453 Renaissance Creativity: 3 semester hours.

Examination of the conditions promoting individual creativity among Europeans in the first global age, 1400-1700. Special emphasis on geospatial research on the history of printing. AS

HIST 4460 The Global Hispanic Monarchy: 3 semester hours.

The African, American, Asian, European, and Oceanic domains of the Iberian Habsburg dynasty, especially those of Castile and Portugal, whose officials and subjects created and maintained many of the communications routes that defined the first global age. Students prepare geospatial datasets on these routes. AS

HIST 4461 Independent Study:US: 1-3 semester hour.

Selected readings in areas and periods not covered by the regular curriculum offerings. PREREQ: Previous upper-division course work in the subject area with a minimum grade of A-; GPA of 3.5 in all hisory courses; permission of the instructor; and approval by the department chair. D

HIST 4462 Independent Study: Europe: 1-3 semester hour.

Selected readings in areas and periods not covered by the regular curriculum offerings. PREREQ: Previous upper-division course work in the subject area with a minimum grade of A-; GPA of 3.5 in all history courses; permission of the instructor; and approval by the department chair. D

HIST 4463 Independent Study:World Rgns: 1-3 semester hour.

Selected readings in areas and periods not covered by the regular curriculum offerings. PREREQ: Previous upper-division course work in the subject area with a minimum grade of A-; GPA of 3.5 in all history courses; permission of the instructor; and approval by the department chair. D

HIST 4465 US Political History: 3 semester hours.

Study of the political history of the United States involving a discussion of theories of popular voting behavior, critical elections, and political party systems. Equivalent to POLS 4465. R2

HIST 4471 Historical Geography of Idaho: 3 semester hours.

Influences of geography and geology on Idaho's economic, political and cultural history. May be team taught and include field trips, discussion sections. Equivalent to GEOL 4471 and POLS 4471. D

HIST 4474 Islam and Natnlism Mod World: 3 semester hours.

A study of the interaction of Islam and national and ethnic identities in the Middle East including North Africa from 1800 up to the recent past. D

HIST 4478 Imperialism and Progressivism: 3 semester hours.

A study of the world 1880-1920. Movements of change within the West, Third World responses to the Western challenge, and global crisis. D

HIST 4479 Disease and U.S. Public Health: 3 semester hours.

A survey of health, disease, and public health developments in American history. The course takes a broad approach to health, but includes the development of public health offices, the role of disease in society, specific diseases and related eradication programs, and questions related to health, equity, and civil liberties. R2

HIST 4489 GIS for Social Sciences: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to geographic information systems theory and applications focusing on subjects related to human systems in historical context (census, health, urban communities, etc.). Students will work directly with GIS software and learn foundational data management and processing skills along with introductory spatial analysis. Requires competence in computer operating systems. S, Su

HIST 4490 Cartography:Hist and Design: 3 semester hours.

History of how map-makers represent geographic, spatial data. Special attention to the elements of successful cartographic design. PREREQ: Admission to the Historical Resources Management Program or permission of instructor. COREQ: HIST 4490L. F

HIST 4490L Cartography Lab: 1 semester hour.

Focuses on the application of Cartographic design concepts and techniques discussed in lecture. Provides students with hands-on practice designing map products of publication quality. COREQ: HIST 4490. F

HIST 4491 Seminar: 3 semester hours.

Reading, discussion, and preparation for research papers on selected topics. F, S

HIST 4497 Workshop: 1-2 semester hour.

Workshops aimed at the development and improvement of skills. Does not satisfy requirements for a major or a minor. May be repeated. Graded S/U. D

HIST 4499 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hour.

This course is not described in the catalog. The course title and number of credits are announced in the class schedule by the scheduling department. Experimental courses may be offered no more than three times

Faculty

Chair and Associate Professor

Marsh

Professors

S. Christelow

Hatzenbuehler

Woodworth-Ney

Associate Professors

Kuhlman

Njoku

Assistant Professor

Jones

Visiting Assistant Professor

Stamm

Lecturers

Maheras

Sivitz

Stover

Adjunct Faculty

Benedict

Callis

Emfield

Francis

Leibert

Reinke

Storms

Emeriti

Marley

Owens

Ruckman

Swanson