English and Philosophy

The Department of English and Philosophy offers broad curricula in two humanistic disciplines. English studies include courses that treat the nature of language, courses that explore human experience as represented in imaginative literature, and courses that develop general and specialized writing skills. The philosophy curriculum examines such topics as the nature of reality and being, the ways that knowledge is acquired, and the bases for ethical choices.

These curricula serve two broad purposes: 1) they contribute to the general education, the personal enrichment and fulfillment, of students in all disciplines, and 2) they lead to degrees with majors or minors. Specifically, the department offers the B.A. and M.A. in English, the Ph.D. in English and Teaching of English, and the B.A. in philosophy. (Full descriptions of the graduate degree programs in English may be found in the Graduate Catalog.)

Equipped with an undergraduate degree in either English or philosophy, students are prepared to enter graduate degree programs, to pursue training in such professions as medicine, law, or religion, or to embark upon a great variety of careers in government/business/industry that demand broad, liberal arts perspectives and strong observational, fact-finding, analytical, and communication skills. Additionally, English majors (with proper certification) are well prepared for careers in secondary ­education.

English Program

The Department of English and Philosophy offers broad curricula in English studies which include courses that treat the nature of language, courses that explore human experience as represented in imaginative literature, and courses that develop general and specialized writing skills. Beyond contributing to students’ general education and the personal enrichment and fulfillment of students in all disciplines, courses in the English programs lead to Bachelor’s degrees as well as a range of minors. After graduation English students are prepared to embark upon a variety of careers which demand broad, liberal arts perspectives, and strong observational, fact-finding, analytical, and communications skills.

As such, the Department has articulated the following goals and student learning outcomes for students at the undergraduate level.

Mission and Goals

Undergraduate English programs in the Department of English and Philosophy provide students wishing to pursue a liberal arts education training in the study of language, literature, writing, and culture. Such training will provide students with strong communication skills, an ability to gather information and use it critically, an understanding of the function of language within the culture, and a historical and critical understanding of the role literature plays within the human experience.

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Undergraduate English students will write in a variety of modes and genres suitable to the demands of the given rhetorical situation.
  2. Undergraduate English students will formulate research problems, do effective research, and incorporate the results of their research into their own writing.
  3. Undergraduate English students will read effectively and analyze critically literary texts and will understand the theoretical underpinnings of this ­process.
  4. Undergraduate English students will understand the significance of texts within their historical and cultural ­contexts.
  5. Undergraduate English students will understand language as a medium of common linguistic principles; they will understand the relationship of these linguistic principles to communication and expression.

Philosophy Program

The Philosophy Program offers courses on the history of philosophy, philosophical issues, and the cognitive skills required in philosophy. These offer students a deeper understanding of our past and our place in the world, as well as helping them to develop analytic and writing skills that are valuable in all disciplines. Students take either Introduction to Philosophy (PHIL 1101) or Introduction to Ethics (PHIL 1103) to partially meet Objective 4 of the General Education Requirements. The Philosophy Program offers a Bachelor’s degree and a minor to our undergraduate students. After graduation, philosophy students are well prepared to enter law school or graduate degree programs, or to pursue careers that require strong analytical and writing skills.

Mission and Goals

The Philosophy Program provides students pursuing a liberal arts education training in the history of philosophy, philosophical issues, and the analytic skills required in philosophy. This training will provide students with strong analytical and writing skills, the ability to read philosophical texts critically, the ability to formulate and defend philosophical positions, and a grasp of the historical context and broader implications of philosophical ­positions.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Undergraduate Philosophy students will be able to write clear, organized, and grammatically correct prose.
  2. Students will be able to read philosophical texts critically.
  3. Students will be able to formulate a clear and substantive position regarding a major philosophical problem.
  4. Students will be able to develop cogent arguments in support of that position, and to recognize and criticize the strongest arguments against it.
  5. Students will be aware of major philosophers’ arguments relevant to that ­position.
  6. Students will be aware of the larger historical and intellectual context of the problem addressed.
  7. Students will be aware of the broader implications of the position embraced.

Folklore Program

Folklore is the dynamic and variable expressive culture that we learn in informal interactions with people we meet regularly or that we learn through informal communications via the Internet or personal writing.The many traditional genres of folklore include the verbal arts, such as epic, ballad, folksong, folktale, legend, myth, joke, tall tale, riddle, and proverb.  Newer genres include YouTube postings, contemporary ("urban") legends, and digital "memes."  Folklore also includes customary and material forms, such as calendar customs, games, dances, foodways, modes of dress, folk architecture, and crafts such as chair making, blacksmithing, and the many forms of fabric art.  People learn and share folklore with interest groups that have a common ethnic, religious, occupational, hobby, or other experiential basis.

Folklore studies range widely.  Our program at Idaho State University has two focuses:  in English courses we study oral literature:  the way it is learned, transmitted, and performed, and its cultural and historical contexts.  We focus on textual questions, studying folk aesthetics and connotation and the relationships between oral and written literatures.  In Anthropology courses we study folklore as an expression of cultural diversity and examine the social functions of folklore within cultural groups.  Students minoring in folklore may take courses from both departments to obtain a well-rounded understanding of folklore.

Knowledge and skills in folklore enhance a broad range of majors.  Experience in folklore benefits students interested in continuing to graduate programs in folklore, history, anthropology, English, American studies, and sociology.  Knowledge of folklore is helpful, too, in public history, museum, and oral history programs.  Folklore courses enhance the knowledge of both elementary and secondary teachers and of those planning to do social work or to work in business or in the health-related professions.

Bachelor of Arts In English

A student may select only one of the Options below--Literary, Professional Writing, or Creative ­Writing--to fulfill the requirements for the English major. As there is only one English major, it is not possible to select more than one of these options to double major in English. Each option requires completion of 45 semester hours as specified (excluding lower division composition courses—ENGL 0090, ENGL 1101, and ENGL 1102).

Option 1 - Literary

Take these required courses:

ENGL 2211Intro to Literary Analysis3
ENGL 2280Grammar and Usage3
or ENGL 2281 Intro to Language Studies
ENGL 3311Writing and Research about Lit3
ENGL 4491Senior Seminar in Literature3
Select two of the following survey courses: 6
Survey of British Literature I
Survey of British Lit II
Survey of American Lit I
Survey of American Lit II
Select one of the following genre study courses: 3
Genre Studies in Drama
Genre Studies in Poetry
Genre Studies in Fiction
Genre Studies in Nonfiction
Special Topics in Genre
Select two of the following period courses: 6
Studies Classical Literature
Studies Medieval Literature
Studies Renaissance Literature
Studies Seventeenth-Cntury Lit
Studies Eighteenth-Cntury Lit
Stdies Erly Nnteenth-Cntry Lit
Stdies Late Nnteenth-Cntry Lit
Stdies Erly Twntieth-Cntry Lit
Studies in Contemporary Lit
Select one of the following major figure courses: 3
Proseminar in Major Lit Fig
Chaucer
Milton
Shakespeare
Select one of the following themes and identity courses: 3
Gender in Literature
Ethnicity in Literature
American Indian Literature
Post-Colonial Literature
Select one of the following language studies courses: 3
Varieties of American English
Studies In Grammar
Rotating Topics in Linguistics
Old English
History of the English Lang
Intro to Sociolinguistics
Electives
Select 9 additional elective credits from English courses listed in Literary Option, Professional Writing Option and Creative Writing Option, or the following courses, 6 credits of which must be upper-division courses:9
Introduction to Literature
Major Themes in Literature
(either of the 2 courses above partially satisfies General Education Objective 4)
Intro to Folklore/Oral Tradn (satisfies General Education Objective 9)
Survey of World Literature I
Survey of World Literature II
(either of the 2 courses above partially satisfies General Education Objective 4)
Art of the Film II
Bible as Literature
Language in the United States
Philosophy and Literature
Studies in National Literature
Comparative Literature
Shakespeare in Performance
Topics in Folklore
Folklore and Literature
Total Hours45

Option 2 - Professional Writing

Note: Students electing the writing option in the professional writing track are strongly encouraged to minor in a discipline relevant to their professional ­interests.

Take these required courses:

ENGL 2211Intro to Literary Analysis3
ENGL 2280Grammar and Usage3
or ENGL 2281 Intro to Language Studies
ENGL 3307Professional and Tech Writing3
ENGL 3308Business Communications3
ENGL 3311Writing and Research about Lit3
ENGL 4401Advanced Composition3
ENGL 4410Writing Internship3
PHIL 2201Introduction to Logic (satisfies General Education Objective 7)3
Select one of the following creative writing courses: 3
Creative Writing Workshop
Intermed Creative Writing
Adv Creative Writing Workshop
Select three of the following writing and media courses: 9-10
Writing Internship
Graphic Design
Advanced Graphic Design
Introduction to Photography
Advanced Photography
Editing for Print Media
Magazine Article Writing
Advertising Copywriting
Editorial Writing
Rhetorical Theory
Select two of the following survey courses: 6
Survey of British Literature I
Survey of British Lit II
Survey of American Lit I
Survey of American Lit II
Select one of the following genre study courses:3
Genre Studies in Drama
Genre Studies in Poetry
Genre Studies in Fiction
Genre Studies in Nonfiction
Total Hours45

 

Option 3 - Creative Writing

Note: Students electing the creative writing option are strongly encouraged to consider a minor to broaden career options.

Required courses:

ENGL 2206Creative Writing Workshop3
ENGL 2211Intro to Literary Analysis3
ENGL 2280Grammar and Usage3
or ENGL 2281 Intro to Language Studies
ENGL 3306Intermed Creative Writing3
ENGL 3311Writing and Research about Lit3
ENGL 4406Adv Creative Writing Workshop3
ENGL 4494Sr Seminar Creative Writing3
Select two of the following survey courses: 6
Survey of British Literature I
Survey of British Lit II
Survey of American Lit I
Survey of American Lit II
Select two of the following genre study courses: 6
Genre Studies in Drama
Genre Studies in Poetry
Genre Studies in Fiction
Genre Studies in Nonfiction
Select one of the following language studies courses:3
Varieties of American English
Studies In Grammar
History of the English Lang
Select one of the following period courses: 3
Studies Classical Literature
Studies Medieval Literature
Studies Renaissance Literature
Studies Seventeenth-Cntury Lit
Studies Eighteenth-Cntury Lit
Stdies Erly Nnteenth-Cntry Lit
Stdies Late Nnteenth-Cntry Lit
Stdies Erly Twntieth-Cntry Lit
Studies in Contemporary Lit
Select one of the following theme, identity, and performance studies courses: 3
Art of the Film II
Gender in Literature
Ethnicity in Literature
American Indian Literature
Post-Colonial Literature
Topics in Folklore
Folklore and Literature
Select one of the following advanced writing courses: 3
Advanced Composition
Adv Creative Writing Workshop (in a different genre)
Literary Magazine Production
Total Hours45

 

Minor in English

Many students take English courses as electives to enhance their studies in other areas or as preparation for professional work. The Department of English and Philosophy offers three minors in English—one general minor and two specialized minors in writing—for students who wish to receive recognition for substantial training in literature and writing. Lower division composition courses—ENGL 0090, ENGL 1101, and ENGL 1102—do not count toward completion of these minors.

Option 1 - General

Twenty-one hours of credit in English, 12 of which must be in upper division courses, including either ENGL 3307 or ENGL 3311.

Option 2 - Writing

Required Courses:

ENGL 2280Grammar and Usage3
or ENGL 2281 Intro to Language Studies
ENGL 3311Writing and Research about Lit3
ENGL 4487History of the English Lang3
Plus four other courses, of which at least two must be upper-division, from among the following courses: 12
Nature of Language
Creative Writing Workshop
Intermed Creative Writing
Professional and Tech Writing
Advanced Composition
Adv Creative Writing Workshop
Studies In Grammar
Rotating Topics in Linguistics
Introduction to Logic
Total Hours21

Option 3 - Creative Writing

Required Courses:

ENGL 2206Creative Writing Workshop3
ENGL 2211Intro to Literary Analysis3
ENGL 3306Intermed Creative Writing3
ENGL 4406Adv Creative Writing Workshop3
ENGL 4494Sr Seminar Creative Writing3
Select one of the following: 3
Survey of World Literature I
Survey of World Literature II
Survey of British Literature I
Survey of British Lit II
Survey of American Lit I
Survey of American Lit II
Upper-division elective3
Total Hours21


English Education Program

For the requirements of the Secondary Teaching Major in English, the Single Subject Teaching Major in English, and the Teaching Minor in English, see the descriptions in the Teacher Education Program.

Placement in English Composition Courses

Regulations and procedures governing student placement in the composition-course sequence are summarized under General Education Requirements, Objective 1. Students should consult with the Director of Composition concerning applicability toward Objective 1 requirements of writing courses taken at other institutions.

English Courses

Prerequisites and Standards

Students must complete Objective 1 or its equivalent before enrolling in 2000-level ENGL courses.

At least one semester of lower-division literature is prerequisite for 3000-level literature courses.

To enroll in a 4000-level course, students must both complete all 2000-level English requirements (ENGL 2211, ENGL 2280/ENGL 2281, and two Literature survey courses) and must have junior or senior standing.

To graduate as an English major or with an English minor, a student must maintain at least a 2.25 grade point average in courses within the English curriculum.

Some courses may have additional prerequisites.

Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy

Students who wish to major in philosophy should select either the traditional major or the major with a Pre-law Emphasis. In addition to University General Education requirements for a Bachelor of Arts degree, students wishing to major in Philosophy will follow the curriculum listed below. Students interested in coursework with an ethics or religion perspective should consult with departmental advisors.

Students wishing to earn a minor in this department may select among a minor in Ethics, a minor in Philosophy, and a minor in Philosophy and Religion.

Option 1 - Traditional Major

Required courses:

PHIL 2201Introduction to Logic (satisfies General Education Objective 7)3
PHIL 3305Greek Reason and Christianity3
PHIL 3315Early Modern Philosophy3
PHIL 4450Ethical Theory3
PHIL 4460Theory of Knowledge3
PHIL 4492Senior Tutorial3
Plus 12 additional hours of philosophy electives12
Total Hours30

Option 2 - Pre-Law Emphasis

Required courses:

PHIL 2201Introduction to Logic (satisfies General Education Objective 7)3
PHIL 3305Greek Reason and Christianity3
PHIL 3353Philosophy of Law3
PHIL 4450Ethical Theory3
PHIL 4460Theory of Knowledge3
PHIL 4492Senior Tutorial3
Plus one course from the following: 3
Political and Soc Philosophy
Intro to Political Philosophy
Topics in Political Theory
Contemporary Political Theory
Plus one course from the following: 3
Introduction to Criminal Law
Constitutional Law
Constitutional Law
Jurisprudence
Plus six additional hours of philosophy electives6
Total Hours30

 

Minor in Ethics

Required courses: eighteen semester-hours of philosophy including:

PHIL 4450Ethical Theory3
And at least two of the following: 6
Philosophic Issues in Religion
Medical Ethics
Philosophy of Law
Political and Soc Philosophy


Minor in Philosophy

A minor in philosophy is recommended for students seeking a liberal arts education. Required courses for the minor: any eighteen semester-hour credits elected from the philosophy curriculum.

 

Minor in Philosophy and Religion

Eighteen semester-hours of philosophy including:

Select two of the following: 6
Intro to Asian Philosophies (satisfies General Education Objective 9)
Philosophic Issues in Religion
Philosophy and Old Test
Existentialism
Plus one of the following: 3
East Asian History
Middle Eastern Civilization
The Sociology of Religion

Minor in Folklore

The program in folklore offers a minor designed to augment Anthropology, English, History, Sociology, or any other major.  The program's required course, ANTH 2212/ENGL 2212, introduces students to the study of folklore genres, folklore fieldwork, and types of folk groups.  Upper-division courses provide students with more focused study of folklore issues and genres, the history of folklore scholarship, particular folk cultures, and the interrelationship of genres within those cultures.  The program also provides opportunities for study of ethnographic and material culture fieldwork techniques.  Specialized courses include material culture, American Indian verbal and material arts, and courses in the relationships between folklore and literature, including fantasy literature.

The minor in folklore consists of 18 credits as follows:

Required Course:

ANTH 2212Intro to Folklore Oral Tradns (satisfies General Education Objective 9)3
or ENGL 2212 Intro to Folklore/Oral Tradn
Select 15 credits from:15
Intro to Shoshoni Folklore
Material Culture Analysis
Qualitative Research Methods
American Indian Verbal Arts
Native American Arts
Topics in Folklore
Topics in Folklore
Folklore and Literature
Total Hours18

How to Read Course Descriptions

English Courses

ENGL 0090 Basic Writing: 3 semester hours.

For students not meeting ENGL 1101 placement requirements. Prepares students for ENGL 1101 by addressing fundamentals at sentence, paragraph, and essay levels, with emphasis on student's own writing. Graded S/U. F, S, Su

ENGL 1100 Acad Writing and Speech ESOL: 3 semester hours.

Explores culture-based academic expectations and conventions in communication. Graded S/U. PREREQ: ISU Admission; 500+ TOEFL or permission. F, S

ENGL 1101 English Composition: 3 semester hours.

Course in which students read, analyze and write expository essays for a variety of purposes consistent with expectations for college-level writing in standard edited English. F, S, Su

ENGL 1102 Critical Reading and Writing: 3 semester hours.

Writing essays based on readings. Focus on critical reading; research methods; gathering, evaluating, analyzing, and synthesizing ideas and evidence; documentation. Satisfies Objective 1 of the General Education Requirements. PREREQ: ENGL 1101 or equivalent. F, S, Su

ENGL 1107 Nature of Language: 3 semester hours.

General survey of structure and use of language. Topics include language origins, descriptive and historical linguistics, language and culture, and history of the English language. Equivalent to ANTH 1107 and LANG 1107. Satisfies Objective 7 of the General Education Requirements. S

ENGL 1110 Introduction to Literature: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the critical reading of various literary genres, with attention to the interpretation and evaluation of representative texts. Partially satisfies Objective 4 of the General Education Requirements. F, S, Su

ENGL 1115 Major Themes in Literature: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to literature through the study of one or more major themes that cross historical and cultural boundaries. May be repeated for up to 6 credits with different content. Partially satisfies Objective 4 of the General Education Requirements. F, S, Su

ENGL 1126 Art of Film I: 3 semester hours.

Course examines the creative process, aesthetic principles and historical background of cinematic arts. Screening of representative films and examination of critical works and theories are included. Partially satisfies Objective 4 of the General Education Requirements. R2

ENGL 2206 Creative Writing Workshop: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to one or more forms of creative writing. R1

ENGL 2211 Intro to Literary Analysis: 3 semester hours.

Writing-intensive course. Teaches students how to perform close readings of poetry and prose. Introduces major theoretical approaches to literature. Includes orientation to finding and evaluating secondary criticism. PREREQ: ENGL 1102 or equivalent. F, S

ENGL 2212 Intro to Folklore/Oral Tradn: 3 semester hours.

Folklore genres and folk groups, including introductory experience in folklore fieldwork focused on study of a genre or group of genres within verbal, customary, or material culture. Equivalent to ANTH 2212. Satisfies Objective 9 of the General Education Requirements. R1

ENGL 2257 Survey of World Literature I: 3 semester hours.

Examination of major works and authors in historical perspective, with emphasis upon literary and cultural backgrounds. Partially satisfies Objective 4 of the General Education Requirements. R1

ENGL 2258 Survey of World Literature II: 3 semester hours.

Examination of major works and authors in historical perspective, with emphasis upon literary and cultural backgrounds. Partially satisfies Objective 4 of the General Education Requirements. R1

ENGL 2267 Survey of British Literature I: 3 semester hours.

Examination of major works and authors in historical perspective, with emphasis upon literary and cultural backgrounds. R1

ENGL 2268 Survey of British Lit II: 3 semester hours.

Examination of major works and authors in historical perspective, with emphasis upon literary and cultural backgrounds. R1

ENGL 2277 Survey of American Lit I: 3 semester hours.

Examination of major works and authors in historical perspective with emphasis upon literary and cultural backgrounds. R1

ENGL 2278 Survey of American Lit II: 3 semester hours.

Examination of major works and authors in historical perspective with emphasis upon literary and cultural backgrounds. R1

ENGL 2280 Grammar and Usage: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to the grammar of standard written English. The course is designed to give students an improved knowledge of grammar in order to improve usage and writing skills at both the sentence and paragraph level. S

ENGL 2281 Intro to Language Studies: 3 semester hours.

Introduction to basic concepts and models for the study of English phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexis. F, S

ENGL 3305 Art of the Film II: 3 semester hours.

In-depth investigation of cinematic art with focus on one or more of the following: genre, historical development, aesthetics, criticism, social impact, and artists. Screening of representative films. PREREQ: ENGL 1126 or permission. D

ENGL 3306 Intermed Creative Writing: 3 semester hours.

Advanced training in one or more of the forms of creative writing. PREREQ: ENGL 2206 or equivalent. R1

ENGL 3307 Professional and Tech Writing: 3 semester hours.

An intensive course covering skills and conventions pertinent to writing in the professions, including technical writing. Applications in disciplines or subjects of interest to the individual student. Especially appropriate for science, engineering, and pre-professional majors. PREREQ: 45 credits and ENGL 1102. F, S

ENGL 3308 Business Communications: 3 semester hours.

An advanced course in conventions of business communications, emphasizing purpose and audience. Focus on style, semantics, research skills, format, persuasion, and critical analysis and synthesis of data. PREREQ: 60 credits and ENGL 1102. F, S, Su

ENGL 3311 Writing and Research about Lit: 3 semester hours.

Writing-intensive course with continued emphasis on close reading. Fosters independent work with criticism. Students first learn to identify current scholarly conversations on issues relevant to the course. Then, in longer essays, they position their own arguments in the context of these discussions. PREREQ: 60 credits including ENGL 2211. F, S

ENGL 3321 Genre Studies in Drama: 3 semester hours.

Comparative study of selected plays through recognition of generic forms and conventions, their origins and continuing evolution, and their theoretical basis. R2

ENGL 3322 Genre Studies in Poetry: 3 semester hours.

Comparative study of selected poems through recognition of generic forms and conventions, their origins and continuing evolution, and their theoretical basis. Emphasis on lyric poetry. R2

ENGL 3323 Genre Studies in Fiction: 3 semester hours.

Comparative studies of varying forms and conventions in selected prose fiction, with attention to their origins, evolution, and theoretical basis. R2

ENGL 3324 Genre Studies in Nonfiction: 3 semester hours.

Comparative study of varying forms and conventions in selected prose nonfiction, with attention to their origins, evolution, and theoretical basis. R2

ENGL 3327 Special Topics in Genre: 3 semester hours.

Focused study of a generic tradition modified by thematic or historical contexts, with emphasis on topics not regularly treated in ENGL 3321-3324. D

ENGL 3328 Gender in Literature: 3 semester hours.

Considers the role of gender in literature, including issues of authorship, reader communities, and literary representations of women and men. R2

ENGL 3341 Bible as Literature: 3 semester hours.

Study of various types of literature found in the Bible, with a view of attaining greater knowledge of and appreciation for this aspect of the literacy heritage. R2

ENGL 3348 Independent Problems: 1-3 semester hour.

Consultation course for upperclassmen interested in problems in language and literature not adequately covered by regular offerings. D

ENGL 3353 West in American Literature: 3 semester hours.

Survey of the literature of Western America since 1800. D

ENGL 3356 Ethnicity in Literature: 3 semester hours.

Study of the construction of ethnicity in literature, with attention to specific concerns relevant to one or more ethnic groups. R2

ENGL 3367 Language in the United States: 3 semester hours.

A survey of the languages of the United States (American Indian languages, immigrant languages, and ethnic and regional varieties of English) along with the social and political aspects of American language use. Equivalent to ANTH 3367. PREREQ: ANTH/LANG/ENGL 1107. D

ENGL 4401 Advanced Composition: 3 semester hours.

An advanced course in which students develop an independent style in writing such types of essays as the personal, biographical, argumentative, and critical. May contain prose analysis. PREREQ: ENGL 3301, ENGL 3307, or ENGL 3308. R1

ENGL 4406 Adv Creative Writing Workshop: 3 semester hours.

Production and discussion of student writing. Study in a specific genre. May be repeated for up to 6 undergraduate credits. PREREQ: ENGL 3306 or permission of instructor. R1

ENGL 4407 Topics in Professional Writing: 3 semester hours.

Topics in professional writing, including standard genres, new media, and emerging trends in research and the workplace. Emphasis on developing practical skills, theoretical knowledge, and finished professional documents related to the topic. May be repeated once with a different topic for a maximum total of 6 credits. PREREQ: ENGL 3307 or ENGL 3308 or permission of instructor. R1

ENGL 4409 Literary Magazine Production: 3 semester hours.

Hands-on experience in literary magazine production; editing, proofreading, and design. Strategies for screening and selecting stories, poems, and reviews. Consideration of the role of the small press in national literary culture. PREREQ: ENGL 2206. S

ENGL 4410 Writing Internship: 1-6 semester hour.

On-the-job writing experience in business, industry, or government settings. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. Graded S/U. PREREQ: 90 credits and ENGL 3301, ENGL 3307, or ENGL 3308. F, S, Su

ENGL 4431 Teaching and Writing Projects: 3 semester hours.

Aids teachers of all grade levels and all academic subjects in developing skills in teaching writing. Combines composition theory and practical classroom exercises with daily writing and critiques. D

ENGL 4433 Methods Teaching English: 3 semester hours.

Study of the objectives and methods of teaching literature and composition in secondary schools. Ideally taken semester before student teaching. PREREQ: GOAL 1, ENGL 2211 and ENGL 2281, plus 3 additional hours of English. F

ENGL 4440 Philosophy and Literature: 3 semester hours.

Reflections on the relation between poetic and speculative discourse. Topics include forms of consciousness, temporality and narrative, metaphysics of genre. Equivalent to PHIL 4440. R2

ENGL 4441 History of Literary Criticism: 3 semester hours.

Teaches major theorists and debates that have influenced the interpretation of literature. Students read key theoretical texts. Course may use a thematic or chronological approach. D

ENGL 4453 American Indian Literature: 3 semester hours.

Considers literary works by and about North American native people, especially in relationship to history, genre, and culture, including oral traditions. Equivalent to ANTH 4453. PREREQ: Goal 1. R2

ENGL 4455 Studies in National Literature: 3 semester hours.

Studies in important literatures and cultures not otherwise covered in the curriculum. May include literatures in translation and literature written in English outside of America and the British Isles. Equivalent to CMLT 4415. May be repeated for up to 6 credits with different content. R3

ENGL 4456 Comparative Literature: 3 semester hours.

The analysis of ideas, problems, and techniques common to important writers of various national literatures. R3

ENGL 4461 Studies Classical Literature: 3 semester hours.

Study of the major literature of the classical Greek and Roman periods, especially in relationship to its cultural backgrounds. R3

ENGL 4462 Studies Medieval Literature: 3 semester hours.

Study of the major literature of the Middle Ages and its background, with emphasis upon the development of English literature. R2

ENGL 4463 Studies Renaissance Literature: 3 semester hours.

Study of the major literature of the Renaissance and its background, with emphasis upon the development of English literature. R2

ENGL 4464 Studies Seventeenth-Cntury Lit: 3 semester hours.

Study of the major literature of the seventeenth century and its background, with emphasis upon the development of English or American or other literature of the period. R2

ENGL 4465 Studies Eighteenth-Cntury Lit: 3 semester hours.

Study of the major literature of the eighteenth century and its background, with emphasis upon the development of English or American or other literature of the period. R2

ENGL 4466 Stdies Erly Nnteenth-Cntry Lit: 3 semester hours.

Study of the major literature of the early nineteenth century and its background, with emphasis upon the development of English, American or other literature of the period. R2

ENGL 4467 Stdies Late Nnteenth-Cntry Lit: 3 semester hours.

Study of the major literature of the late nineteenth century and its background, with emphasis upon the development of English, American or other literature of the period. R2

ENGL 4468 Stdies Erly Twntieth-Cntry Lit: 3 semester hours.

Study of the major literature of the early twentieth century and its background, with emphasis upon English, American or other literature of the period. R2

ENGL 4469 Studies in Contemporary Lit: 3 semester hours.

Study of recent major literature and its background, with emphasis upon English or American or other literature of the period. R2

ENGL 4470 Post-Colonial Literature: 3 semester hours.

Study of post-colonial literary texts, with attention to the role of literature in history, political resistance, and social movements of one or more colonized cultures. R2

ENGL 4472 Proseminar in Major Lit Fig: 3 semester hours.

Intensive study in a single major author other than Chaucer, Milton, and Shakespeare, demanding some independent study and small group participation. R1

ENGL 4473 Chaucer: 3 semester hours.

Intensive study of selected works of Chaucer. D

ENGL 4474 Milton: 3 semester hours.

Intensive study of selected works of Milton. D

ENGL 4476 Shakespeare: 3 semester hours.

Intensive study of selected works of Shakespeare. R1

ENGL 4477 Shakespeare in Performance: 3 semester hours.

Intensive study of selected works by Shakespeare, with special emphasis placed upon performance issues. Includes field trip to attend live dramatic productions of Shakespearian plays. D

ENGL 4480 Varieties of American English: 3 semester hours.

In-depth study of various dialects of American English, including historical evolution of different dialects, effects of migration on dialects, and influences of non-English immigrant languages on development of American English. Field-work studying the Snake River dialects of Idaho. Equivalent to ANTH 4480. PREREQ: ANTH/ENGL/LANG 1107 or ENGL 2280 or ENGL 2281. D

ENGL 4481 Studies In Grammar: 3 semester hours.

The advanced study of English grammar. Possible theoretical approaches might include generative grammar, functional grammar, relational grammar, and communicative grammar. PREREQ: ENGL 2280. R2

ENGL 4484 Rotating Topics in Linguistics: 3 semester hours.

Rotating topics in different areas of linguistics and linguistic analysis. Consult current schedule of classes for exact course being taught. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. Equivalent to ANTH 4484 and LANG 4484. PREREQ: ANTH/ENGL/LANG 1107 or ENGL 2280 or ENGL 2281. D

ENGL 4486 Old English: 3 semester hours.

Intensive study of the Old English language, with attention to its intrinsic structure and its relation to Middle and Modern English. R2

ENGL 4487 History of the English Lang: 3 semester hours.

Study of the linguistic and socio-political changes and developments in the English language. PREREQ: ENGL 2280 OR ENGL 2281. R2

ENGL 4488 Intro to Sociolinguistics: 3 semester hours.

Study of the patterned covariation of language and society, social dialects and social styles in language; problems of bilingualism, multilingualism, creoles and language uses. Equivalent to ANTH 4450. PREREQ: ANTH 1107, ENGL 2280 or ENGL 2281, or permission of instructor. F

ENGL 4490 Topics in Folklore: 3 semester hours.

Focused study of an issue in folkloristics or a particular genre of folklore, including history of the scholarship concerning that issue or genre. Rotating topics. May be repeated up to 9 credits with different topics. Equivalent to ANTH 4490. R1

ENGL 4491 Senior Seminar in Literature: 3 semester hours.

Students demonstrate their reading and research skills in this capstone course. Within instructor's chosen theme, students develop a cumulative research project including a substantial paper and oral presentation. PREREQ: ENGL 3311 and 6 additional hours of upper-division English. F, S

ENGL 4492 Folklore and Literature: 3 semester hours.

Study of cross-influences between oral and written literatures. Emphasis may be on a written genre that imitates and draws upon oral genres, a movement or period in which oral tradition strongly influences written forms, or a particular writer who incorporates motifs and storytelling patterns from folklore. Rotating topics. May be repeated for up to 9 credits. R2

ENGL 4493 Senior Seminar Prof Writing: 3 semester hours.

Capstone course for professional writing students. Each student will design and complete a substantial professional writing project. Projects will require a project proposal or outline, reading list, final document, and oral presentation. PREREQ: ENGL 4410 or permission of instructor. R1

ENGL 4494 Sr Seminar Creative Writing: 3 semester hours.

Capstone course suitable for students working in any creative writing genre. Each student will compile in advance a reading list and project outline in consultation with instructor. During course, the student will complete a substantial creative writing project and give a presentation. Instructor will also assign class-wide readings, some from each student's list. Workshop-based. PREREQ: ENGL 4406 and permission of instructor. R1 S

ENGL 4497 Workshop: 1-2 semester hour.

Workshop aimed at the development and improvement of skills. Does not satisfy requirements for a major or a minor. May be repeated. Graded S/U. D

Philosophy Courses

PHIL 1101 Introduction to Philosophy: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the major thinkers and major problems in Western philosophical and scientific traditions. Sections may emphasize either an historical or problems approach. Partially satisfies Objective 4 of the General Education Requirements. F, S, Su

PHIL 1103 Introduction to Ethics: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to philosophy through an analytical and historical study of major ethical theories. The course will focus on the basis of judgments and reasoning concerning questions of good and bad, right and wrong. Partially satisfies Objective 4 of the General Education Requirements. F, S, Su

PHIL 2201 Introduction to Logic: 3 semester hours.

An introduction to the concepts and methods of deductive and inductive logic, with special emphasis on the use of logical methods to identify, analyze, construct, and evaluate everyday arguments. Satisfies Objective 7 of the General Education Requirements. R1

PHIL 2210 Intro to Asian Philosophies: 3 semester hours.

A study of Hindu, Buddhist, and other Far Eastern approaches to topics such as immortality, time, reality, mystical experience, the divinity of the soul, the question of duty. Emphasis varies. Satisfies Objective 9 of the General Education Requirements. R2

PHIL 2220 Philosophic Issues in Religion: 3 semester hours.

An inquiry into the nature of religious belief, the concept of God, rational proofs of the existence of God, the religious experience, the concept of faith, the character of religious language, the meaning of myths and symbols, and the question of modern atheism. R2

PHIL 2225 Philosophy and Old Test: 3 semester hours.

Discussion of Hebrew Scripture, with emphasis on the narrative material in the Pentateuch. Commentaries drawn from classical and contemporary philosophy, theology, and literary theory. D

PHIL 2230 Medical Ethics: 3 semester hours.

An examination of ethical issues that arise in medical practice. Topics may include informed consent, withdrawing life-sustaining treatment, abortion, assisted suicide, and the allocation of scarce resources. F, S, Su

PHIL 2299 Experimental Course: 1-6 semester hour.

PHIL 3305 Greek Reason and Christianity: 3 semester hours.

Philosophical readings from the pre-Socratics to St. Thomas Aquinas. Topics include the theory of essence, human nature and happiness, the problem of evil, the relation of reason and faith. R2

PHIL 3315 Early Modern Philosophy: 3 semester hours.

Readings in philosophy from Descartes to Kant. Rationalist and empiricist answers to questions concerning the source and scope of human knowledge. R2

PHIL 3325 Modern Philosophical Movements: 3 semester hours.

Readings in philosophy of the 19th and 20th centuries. Organized to illuminate the development of particular schools of thought, including existentialism, pragmatism, phenomenology, analytic philosophy, and Marxism. Emphasis varies. D

PHIL 3353 Philosophy of Law: 3 semester hours.

An investigation of historical and contemporary theoretical approaches to law and a variety of philosophical problems that arise with respect to the law. Topics include natural law theory, legal positivism, legal realism, Constitutional interpretation, theory of punishment, and civil liberties. R2

PHIL 3355 Political and Soc Philosophy: 3 semester hours.

Questions concerning social justice as discussed by Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Hegel, Marx and others. D

PHIL 4400 Philosophy of Art: 3 semester hours.

Study of philosophic problems encountered in perceiving, interpreting, and evaluating works of art. Topics include the nature of a work of art, aesthetic response, expression, symbol; the nature and role of representation; the nature of interpretive and evaluative claims. R2

PHIL 4410 Philosophy of Language: 3 semester hours.

Study of theories of language, with emphasis on contemporary thinkers such as Frege, Heidegger, Russell, Wittgenstein, Piaget, and Chomsky. Topics include the nature and origin of meaning, the temporal dimension of discourse, the significance of syntax, animal languages, computer languages. D

PHIL 4420 Philosophy of Mind: 3 semester hours.

Inquiry into the mind-body problem and representative solutions, such as dualism, philosophical behaviorism, central-state materialism. Related topics include the self, personal identity, immortality, claims of parapsychology, mystical consciousness. R2

PHIL 4425 Existentialism: 3 semester hours.

A survey of major works of Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, and Camus. Topics may include the origins of values, the death of God, the varieties of despair, the inevitability of love's failure and the absurdity of life. R2

PHIL 4430 Philosophy of Science: 3 semester hours.

A survey of the philosophical issues related to science. Topics include the nature of scientific theories, science and non-science, scientific explanation and causation, realism and anti-realism in science, and scientific revolutions. R2

PHIL 4435 Metaphysics: 3 semester hours.

A study of some of the main questions of metaphysics, including such topics as being, substance, universals, space and time, appearance and reality, identity, freewill and determinism, causality and the nature and possibility of metaphysics itself. D

PHIL 4440 Philosophy and Literature: 3 semester hours.

Reflections on the relation between poetic and speculative discourse. Topics include forms of consciousness, temporality and narrative, metaphysics of genre. Equivalent to ENGL 4440. D

PHIL 4450 Ethical Theory: 3 semester hours.

Study of the nature of value claims, stressing ethical value claims; examination of the scope of reason in ethical decision-making. Applications to normative ethical theories. Related topics include human rights, justice, ethical and legal systems. R2

PHIL 4460 Theory of Knowledge: 3 semester hours.

A survey of topics in epistemology such as the nature of knowledge, the problem of skepticism, and the nature of justification. Various claims about the sources of knowledge, and accounts of a priori knowledge and truth will also be considered. Readings from classical and contemporary sources. R2

PHIL 4470 Symbolic Logic: 3 semester hours.

A comprehensive study of formal methods of determining validity and of systems of symbolic logic, with attention to the philosophy of logic and the relationship between logic and mathematics. D

PHIL 4480 Philosophy Tutorial: 2 semester hours.

Consultation course for seniors interested in a philosophical problem connected with their major field. Will consist of independent reading, conferences, and the preparation of a term paper. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. F, S

PHIL 4490 Philosophy Seminar: 1-3 semester hour.

Advanced reading and discussion on selected topics in philosophy. May be repeated with permission of the department. D

PHIL 4492 Senior Tutorial: 3 semester hours.

A culminating course for senior majors. Directed research resulting in a senior thesis, to be evaluated by the philosophy faculty. PREREQ: 90 credits and permission of the Director of Philosophy. S

Faculty

Chair and Professor

J. Attebery

Director of Philosophy and Professor

Wahl

Director of Graduate Studies and Professor

Winston

Director of Composition and Professor

Swetnam

Professors

B. Attebery

Baergen

A. Johnson

M. Johnson

Levenson

Schmidt

Worsham

Associate Professors

Engebretsen

Hellwig

Klein

Launspach

Montgomery

Skidmore

Whitaker

Wolter

Assistant Professors

Goslee

Petit

Schultz-Hurst

Van Winkle

Senior Lecturers

Norton

Pfister

Associate Lecturers

Dodd

C. Donovan

Hall

S. Johnson

Lattin

McCurdy

Assistant Lecturers

Cole

W. Donovan

Pelletti

Robinson

Shein

Stubbs

Adjunct Faculty

Bonman

Brooks

Charles

Christensen

Coates

Graham

Gray

Haeberle

Harker

Harrison

Lambson

Olsen

Plaster

Reedy

Treasure

VanBezooyen

Wall

Wood

Emeriti

Cantrill

Goldbeck

Huck

Jacob

Kijinski

K. King

W. King

Mullin

Myers

Schow

Smith

Tate

D. Walsh

M. E. Walsh